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Full text of "Proceedings of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Canada at the annual convocation, 1919"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Grand Chapter Royal Arch Masons of Canada in the Province of Ontario 



http://archive.org/details/royalarchmasons1919cana 






JWteomc Calendar 



Ancient Craft Masons commence their era w tj ie WO rld, 

calling it Anno Li year bf'ligfa 

Royal Arch Masons date from the year the second temple was commenced 
by Zerubbabel, Anno Inventions (A. 1\ of the 

discover 1 

Royal and Select Masters date from the year in whi 
Solomon was completed, Anno Depositionis (A. Dei 
of the deposil 

Scottish Rite, same as Ancient Craft, except that Jewish chroi o] 
used, Anno Mundi (A.M.), "in the year of the 

Knights Templars commence their era from the organization of their 
Order, Anno Ordinis (A.O.), "in the year of the Order." 



Eules; for Jfeontc Bate* 



Ancient Craft Mason- 

Add 4000 years to the vul 

Royal Arch — 

Add 530 years to the vul- 



il 4000—5919 



Royal and Select Masters— 

Add 1000 years to the vulgal 

Scottish Ritj: 

Add 3760 years to the vulgar era. 



1919 and 1000— 2919 



Thus : 1919 



Knights Templar — 

From the vulgar era take 1119. 



Thus : 111 




William N. Ponton, K.C., Belleville, Ont. 
M. Ex. Grand Z. 



PROCEEDINGS 



Of the 



Grand Chapter of Royal 
Arch Masons of Canada 



At the 



Sixty-first Annual Convocation 



A. D. 1919 




Held in 

The New Masonic Temple, Yonge Street 
City of Toronto, Ontario 
Tuesday, June 17th, A. D. 1919, A. L. 5919, A. I. 2449 • 



Ordered to be read in all Chapters and preserved 



W. N. Ponton. K.C., Belleville, Ont. Henry T. Smith, Toronto, Ont. 

Grand Z. Grand Scribe E. 



i ,-■: * J * 






Grand Chapter of Canada 



PROCEEDINGS 



The Sixty-first Annual Convocation of the 
Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of 
Canada was held in the Masonic Temple, in 
the City of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Wednesday, 
February 26th, A.D. 1919, A.I. 2449. 

Present : • 

R. Ex. Comp. Robert Hawkins as Grand Z. 

" W. G. Scott . as Grand H. 

M W.G.Bell .as Grand J. 

A. L. Crossin as Grand Treasurer. 

W. Bentley as Grand Scribe E. 

" W. Ducker '. . as Grand Scribe N. 

" Geo. G. Teeter as Grand Principal Sojourner. 

W. F. Taylor as Grand Registrar. 

F. W. Brownell . . . ... .as Grand Senior Sojourner. 

Thos. H. Hooper as Grand Junior Sojourner. 

S. Baird as Grand Lecturer. 

H. E. Nichols as Grand Sword Bearer. 

J. M. Suttie as Grand Master 1st Veil. 

J. T. Black . .as Grand Master 2nd Veil. 

A. H. McLeod as Grand Master 3rd Veil. 

W. N. Brown as Grand Master 4th Veil. 

11 John Parton , .as Grand Standard Bearer. 

"A. Armstrong as Grand Dir. Ceremonies. 

" ]' ]' Jackson as Grand Organist. 

" W. D. Lawrence as Grand Pursuivant. 



4 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

GRAND CHAPTER OPENED 
The Sixty-first Annual Convocation of the Grand 
Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Canada was opened 
in Form, at 10 o'clock a.m., R. Ex. Comp. Robert 
Hawkins, acting Grand Z. stated, M. Ex. Comp. 
A. S. Gorrell, Grand Z., had instructed that arrange- 
ments were made to adjourn this meeting of Grand 
Chapter to a later date on account of the severity of 
the climate at the present time of the year in the City 
of Winnipeg. 

It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. W. G. Scott, acting 
Grand H., and seconded by R. Ex. Comp. W. G. Belh 
Acting Grand J., and adopted : 

"That this Convocation of the Grand Chapter of 
Canada adjourn until Wednesday, 21st day of May, 
19 19, at 10 o'clock in the forenoon. 

Robert Hawkins, 

Acting Grand Z. 

W. Bentley, 

Acting Grand Scribe E. 

Winnipeg, Man., February 26th, 19 19. 



GRAND CHAPTER CONVOCATION POSTPONED 
Owing to labor conditions of unrest in the City of 
Winnipeg, at the date Grand Chapter was to have 
resumed business in that City, it was found necessary 
to postpone the Annual Convocation, and subsequently 
the Grand Z] directed that Grand Chapter should 
resume business in the City of Toronto, Tuesday, 
June 17th, at the hour of 10 o'clock a.m. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 5 

PROCEEDINGS 

The Sixty-first Annual Convocation of the Grand 
Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Canada 

RESUMED BUSINESS IN THE NEW MASONIC TeM- 

ple, City of Toronto, Tuesday, June 17TH, 
A.D. 1919, A.I. 2449. 



Present : 

M. Ex. Comp. A. S. Gorrell Grand 

R. " " W. N. Ponton Grand 

M. "« " W. S. R. Murch as Grand 

M. M " George Moore Grand 

R. " " Henry T. Smith Grand 

R. " " R. J. Gibson as Grand 

R. " " W.G.Price Grand 

R. " " Alex. G. Horwood. . . .as Grand 

R. " " James B. Nixon Grand 

R. " " E. J. Repath as Grand 

R. " " B. Cairns as Grand 

" A. L. Tinker .as Grand 

" W. H. Woodstock. . . .as Grand 

R. " " J. J. Hoidge as Grand 

" J. Cleeland .as Grand 

" H. H. Laing as Grand 

W. H. Roberts as Grand 

R. " " W.S.Milne as Grand 

V. W. A. Lyon as Grand 

R. " " John Boyd as Grand 

V. " F.S.Lewis ...Grand 

V. " Wm. Porteous. ...:... .Grand 

J. Herriot as Grand 

J. C. Bennett . .as Grand 

S. Ward ■ . . as Grand 

I " F.D.Hunt as Grand 

C. F. Brooks. ....... /as Grand 



Grand Council. 



Z. ) 
H. 

J. 

Treasurer. 
Scribe E. 
Scribe N. 

Principal Sojourner. 
Registrar. 
Lecturer . 
Senior Sojourner. 
Junior Sojourner. 
Sword Bearer. 
Master 1st Veil. 
Master 2nd Veil. 
Master 3rd Veil. 
Master 4th Veil. 
Standard Bearer. 
Dir. of Ceremonies 
Organist. 
Pursuivant. 
Steward. 
Steward. 
Steward. 
Steward. 
Steward . 
Steward. 
Steward. 



GRAND SUPERINTENDENTS 

R. Ex. Comp. John Nunn Strathroy Dist. No. 2 

Thomas C. Rundle. . , Guelph " " ,. -.4 

Walter H. Davis Hamilton " " 5 

Ross C. Douglas .. Welland " " 7 

R. J. Reade Toronto << " 8 

Wm.M. Van Valkenburgh. Whitby : " " 10 

James Broatch Little Trenton 1 1 

William Young Mills:. . . . -'Kingston " " 12 

Herbert Willson Lundy. ... Almonte " " 13 

Robert LeHeup . . .Haileybury : " " 23 



i> it 



6 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

GRAND CHAPTER RESUMED BUSINESS 

A Constitutional number of Chapters being repre- 
sented by their qualified officers, the Sixty-first Annual 
Convocation of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch 
Masons of Canada resumed business in Ample Form 
at 10 o'clock a.m. 

COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS 

R. Ex. Comp. James McC. Potts, Chairman of the 
Committee on Credentials of Representatives and 
Proxies from Chapters, reported that there were 165 
Warranted Chapters and 1 under Dispensation on the 
roll of Grand Chapter, of which number 71 were re- 
presented by the following Companions : 

No. 1. Ancient Frantenac and Cataraqui, Kingston. , 

. Ex. Comp. H. J. Milne, Z.; R. Ex. Comp. W. Y. Mills, 
M. Ex. Comps. W. S. R. Murch, A. Shaw, P.Z.'s. 

No. 2. The Hiram, Hamilton. 

Ex. Comps. Robert Buchanan, Z.; D. R. Gibson, D. W. 
Evans, James Dixon; V. Ex. Comp. G. H. Lanigan ; 
M. Ex. Comp. George Moore, P.Z.'s. 

No. 3. St. John's, London. 

Ex. Comp. J. W. Wallace, Z.; R. Ex. Comp. O. Ellwood, 
P.Z. 
No. 4. St. Andrew and St. John, Toronto. 

Ex. Comp. E. Lankin, H.; V. Ex. Comp. J. G. Boyce ; 
R. Ex. Comps. R. W. Clewlo, W. G. Price (Proxy) ; 
Henry t. Smith, Past Z.'s. 

No. 5. St. George's, London. 

Ex. Comp. F. S. Campbell, Z. 

No. 6. St. John's, Hamilton. 

Ex. Comps. H. R. Clark, Z.; C. H. Wray, S. S. Forbes ; 
R. Ex. Comp. George Britton ; M. Ex. Comp. W. G. 
Reid, P.Z.'s. 

No. 7. The Moira, Belleville. 

Ex. Comps. J. O. R. McCurdy (Proxy), Wm. Thompson, 
R. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton, P.Z.'s. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 7 

No. S. King Solomon's, Toronto. 

Ex. Comps. F. D. Hunt, Z.; C. Wahlroth, J.; W. H. 
Woodstock, C. H. B. Johnson, J. W. Johnson, W. H. 
Roberts, A. L. Tinker, L. E. Bowerman ; V. Ex. Comps. 
Wm. Anderson, N. T. Lyon, Wm. Porteous, Joseph Doust; 
R. Ex. Comps. E. T. Malone, J. B. Nixon, E. M. Carleton, 
Geo. McLeish, P.Z.'s. 

No. i$. Wawanosh, Sarnia. 

Ex. Comp. E. J. Everett ; R. Ex. Comp. J. Boyd, P.Z.'s. 

No. 16. Carleton, Ottawa. 

Ex. Comp. A. H. McKee, Z.; R. Ex. Comp. Wm. Rea, 
P.Z.'s. 

No. 18. Oxford, Woodstock. 

Ex. Comps. M. E. Sherwood (Proxy), R. D. Montgomery, 
P.Z.'s. 

No. iq. Mount Moriah, St. Catharines. 

Ex. Comp. George H. Smith (Proxy), P.Z. 

No. 22. Grenville, Prescott. 

Ex. Comp. A. G. Ball (Proxy), P.Z. 

No. 23. Ezra, Simcoe. 

R. Ex. Comp. J. H. Shaw (Proxy), P.Z. 

No. 26. St. Mark's, Trenton. 

Ex. Comp. A. D. Maclntyre ; R. Ex. Comps. R. H. 
Spencer (Proxy), J. B. Little, P.Z.'s. 

No. 27. Manitou, Collingwood. 

Ex. Comp. J. A. Caslake, Z.; V. Ex. Comp. Robert 
Hughes, P.Z. 

No. 30. Huron, Goderich. 

R. Ex. Comp. Joseph Beck (Proxy), P.Z. 

No. 32. Waterloo, Gait. 

V. Ex. Comp. T. F. Campbell ; R. Ex. Comp. J. H. 
Cowan (Proxy), P.Z.'s. 

No. 34. Signet, Barrie. 

R. Ex. Comp. A. Cowan, Z. 

No. 35. Keystone, Whitby. 

R. Ex. Comp. W. M. VanValkenburgh, P.Z. 



8 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

No. j6. Corinthian^ Peterborough. 

Ex. Comp. J.'D. Cameron, Z. 

No. 40. Guelph, Guelph. 

Ex. Comp. J. Gould, Z.; R. Ex. Comps. T. C. Rundle, 
W. G. Stephenson, P.Z.'s. 

No. 41. Harris, Ingersoll. 

Ex. Comp. W. A. Sutherland (Proxy), P.Z. 

No. 44. Mount Sinai, Napanee. 

•. R. Ex. Comp. J. McC. Potts (Proxy). 

No. 46. St. James', St. Mary's. ' .-. 

Ex. Comp. C. E. Richardson, Z. 

No. 54, Palestine, St. Thomas. 

Ex. Comp. T. L. Cochrane (Proxy) ; R. Ex. Comp. N. W. 
Ford, P.Z.'s. 

No. 60. Doric, Newmarket. 

Ex. Comps. W. R. McQuade, H.; N. L. Rogers, P.Z. 

No. 61. Granite, Almonte. 

R. Ex. Comp. H. W. Lundy (Proxy), P.Z. 

No. 62. York, Toronto. 

Ex. Comps. John Cleeland, J. ; R. Lennox, W. C. Norman, 
W. E. Hoffland, E. C. Coath, J. T. Watson,. Charles F. 
Brooks, M. Engers, J. J. Madden ; V. Ex,. Comps. Wm. 
Duncan, T. J. Ivey, D. Robertson ; R. Ex. Comps. 
R. W. Hull, R. J. Gibson, A. J. Brown, P.Z.'s. 

No. 64. Willson, Welland. 

R. Ex. Comp. R. C. Douglas (Proxy), P.Z. 

No. 65. St. Paul's, Toronto. 

Ex. Comps. H! S. Park, Z.; E. J. B. Duncan, E. W. E. 
Saunders ; R. Ex. Comps. .E. B. Brown, W. S. Morden, 
D. Ponton, R. J. Reade, K. J\ Dunstan ; M. Ex. Comip. 
- ; T\ W. Harcourt, P.Z.'s. 

No. 70. Grand River, Bracebridge. 

Ex. Comp. J. W.'Reid, Z. ':': 

No. 72. Keystone, Stirling. 

Ex. Comps. T. E. B. Yeats, Z.\ T. W. Solmes ; K. Ex. 
Comps. H. H. Alger, James McC. Potts, P.Z.'s. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION; TORONTO, 1919 9 

No. 73. - Erie, Ridgetown. 

Ex. Comp. R. R. Fleury (Proxy). 

No. 74. Beaver, Strathroy. 

R. Ex. Comp. John Nunn (Proxy), P.Z. 

No. 75. St. Clair, Milton. 

Ex. Comp. F. A. Brown, P.Z. 

No. 77. Occident, Toronto. 

Ex. Comp. John Russell, Z.; R. Ex. Comps. E..J. Repath, 
A.^G. Horwood, D. J. Proctor, P.Z.'s. 

No. 79. Orient, Toronto. 

Ex. Comps. J. C. Bennett, Z.; D. S. L. MacDougall, H.; 
J. F. Scuse, J.; Geo. Spademan, J. Boulton, S. P. Ward, 
R. ExJComp. G. B. Foster, P.Z.'s. 

No. 80. Ark, Windsor. 

Ex. Comps. E. Sansburn, Z.; R. Fleury, P.Z. 

No. 82. Shuniaht Port Arthur. 

Ex. Comp. A. M. Frank, Z. 

No. 00. Golden, Kenvra. 

Ex. Comp. H. O. Holden, Z. 

No. 91 . A ntiquity, Toronto. 

Ex. Comps. W. J. Armstrong, Z.; F. C. Dann, J.; J. 
Herriott, H. S. McHenry, P. K. Perry ; R. Ex. Comps. 
W. S. Milne, J. J. Hoidge, P.Z.'s. ' 

No. 05. Tuscan, Sudbury. 

Ex. Comps. Wm. McDonald, Z.; A. D. Meldrum, P.Z. 

No. 102. Algonquin, Sault Ste. Marie. 

Ex. Comp. W. Johnson, Z. 

No. no. Warkworth, Warkworth. 

Ex. Comp. David Robertson (Proxy). 

No. 114. Bonnechere, Renfrew. 

Ex, Comp. W. M. H. Quartermaine, Z. 

No. 117. Kitchener, Kitchener. 

Ex. Comp. J. P. Weir (Proxy), P.Z. 



H) GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

No. 124. Westminster, '-'New Westminster. 

R. Ex. Comp. Heury T. .Smilft (Proxy).: .x3 

No. 133. St. Francis, Smith's polls. 

Ex. Comp, H. W. Aunger, Z. 

No. 134. King Darius, Cannington. 

Ex. Comp. Thomas H. Foster (Proxy), P.Z. 

No. 135. Succoth, Uxbridge. 

Ex. Comps. J. W. Rynard, Z.; J. F. Curl, H.; M. E, 
Rodman, J.; D. A. Turner, V. Ex. Comp. V. M. Hare ; 
R. Ex. Comp. W. S. Ormiston, P.Z.'s. 

No. 138. Shekinah, Toronto. 

V. Ex. Comp. W. J. Wadsworth (Proxy), P.Z. 

No. 139. St. Andrew's, Havelock. 

Ex. Comp. H. R. Butterill (Proxy), P.Z. 

No. 140. Fort William, Fort William. 

Ex. Comp. Jno. Cooper, jr., Z. 

No. 145. The St. Patrick, Toronto. 

Ex. Comps. T. C. G. Harrison', H. ; T. H. Graham, W. R. 
Ledger, J. J. Shelley ; R. Ex. Comp. B. Cairns, P.Z.'s. 

No. 150. London, London. 

R. Ex. Comp. O. Ellwood (Proxy). 

No. 152. Alberton, Fort Frances. 

Ex. Comp. P. K. Perry (Proxy). 

No. 155. Ancaster, Ancaster. 

Ex. Comps. W. Roelofston, Z.; D. Smith, H.; A. W. 
Richardson, T. McDermid, J. H. Bates, P.Z.'s. 

No.. J 60. . . Prince Albert, Prince Albert. 

M. Ex. Comp. W. S. R. Murch (Proxy). 

No. 1 63. • The Beaches, Toronto. 

Ex. Comp. W. E. Nugent, Z.; V. Ex. Comp; C. Clark ; 
R. Ex. Comp. G. L. Gardiner, P.Z.'s. 

No. 168. Ionic, Campbellford. 

Ex. Comp. D. F. Robertson ; R. Ex. Comp. E. J. Free, 
P.Z.'s. 

No. 169. Temiskaming, New Liskeard. 

Ex. Comp. W. J. Fuller, H. 

No. 175. The Hamilton, Hamilton. 

R. Ex. Comp. W. H. Davis (Proxy), P.Z. '* 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 11 

tfo. 185. Toronto, Toronto. 

Ex. Comp. J. M. Malcolm, Z. 

Xo. too. Pacific, Vancouver. 

R. Ex. Comp. A. J. Brown (Proxy). 

No. iq8. Couchiching, Orillia. 

V. Ex. Comp. F. S. Lewis (Proxy), P.Z. 

No. 20j. Cobalt, Cobalt. 

R. Ex. Comp. R. LeHeup, (Proxy) P.Z. 

No. 20$. Victoria, Thornhill. 

Ex. Comps. H. H. Lang, J.; E. A. James, P.Z. 

No. 20/. King George, Yorkton. 

R. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton (Proxy). 

No. 2ii. Shaunavon, Shaunavon. 

R. Ex. Comp. J. B. Little (Proxy). 

No. 212. Mount Sinai, Toronto. 

R. Ex. Comp. E. J. Repath, Z.; Ex. Comps. A. Brook- 
stone, H.; John Bland, J. 

• Thirty-eight Chapters were represented by regular 
officers, io were represented by proxy, 23 were re- 
presented by Past Z.'s, making the total Chapters 
represented 71. Ninety-four Chapters were unrepre- 
sented. There were 169 delegates registered; making 
a total of 323 votes. 

Fraternally submitted, 

James McC. Potts, 
W. Y. Mills, 

L. E. BOWERMAN, 

■■•:.- f ;■._..'::.;. 

■■■■■■ fjOMniittee. 

On motion of R. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton, Seconded 
by R. Ex. Comp. J. McC. Potts, the report of the 
Committee on Credentials of Representatives was re- 
ceived and adopted. 

The M. Ex. the Grand Z. announced that all Royal- 
Arch Masons in good standing, and properly vouched 



12 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

for, would now be admitted as visitors during the 
sessions of Grand Chapter. 

The Grand Scribe E. commenced reading the min- 
utes of the Proceedings of the Sixtieth Annual Con- 
vocation, held in the City of Toronto, Wednesday, 
February 27th, 1918, when it was moved by R. Ex. 
Comp. W. N. Ponton, and seconded by M. Ex. Comp. 
W. S. R. Murch, and 

Resolved, — That as the proceedings of the last Annual Convoca- 
tion, held February 27th, 1918, have been printed and copies thereof 
sent to all the Chapters in this Jurisdiction, the recorded minutes 
be considered as read, and the same is now confirmed. 

The Grand Scribe E. then read the minutes of the 
Proceedings of the Sixty-first Annual Convocation, 
held in the City of Winnipeg, Wednesday, February 
26th, 19 19, which Convocation, without transacting 
business, was postponed until Wednesday, May 21st, 
19 19, and owing to labor conditions of unrest had to 
be further postponed and held in the City of Toronto, 
Tuesday, June 17th, 1919, when it was moved by R. 
Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton and seconded by M, Ex. 
Comp. W. S. R. Murch, and 

Resolved, — That the minutes of the Annual Convocation held, 
in the City of Winnipeg, Wednesday, February 26th, 1919, be cori- 
firmed as read. 



GRAND REPRESENTATVIES 

The M, Ex. the Grand Z. directed the Grand 
Scribe E. to call the roll of Representatives of sister 
Grand Chapters, when he welcomed them, and invited 
those in attendance to seats on the dais. The following 
answered their names : 

R. Ex. Comp. William Rea Alabama. 

R. " " J. McC. Potts. . ,. . . Colorado. 

M. .". " fvi Abraham Shaw Connecticut. 

R. " " R. W. Clewlo District of Columbia. 

R. " " James H. Cowan Florida. 

R. " " W. N. Ponton Georgia. 

M, '« » W.G.Reid.... Illinois. 

R. " " John Stevenson ....... .Indiana. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 13 



R. Ex. Comp. Henry T. Smith Kentucky. 



R. 
R. 
R. 
R. 
M. 
M. 
M. 
R. 
R. 
M. 
R. 
R. 



W. Y. Mills Louisiana. 

Oliver Ellwood Minnesota. 

A. G. Horwood . Missouri. 

R. H. Spencer Nebraska. 

W. S. R. Murch New Hampshire. 

F. W. Harcourt New York. 

George Moore Nova Scotia. 

E. B. Brown Quebec. 

E. T. Malone Texas. 

A. S. Gorrell.. Utah. 

J. B. Nixon Vermont. 

Alexander Cowan West Virginia. 



Grand Honors were accorded the Representatives, 
and a suitable response was made by M. Ex. Comp. 
Abraham Shaw, representing Connecticut, on behalf of 
his colleagues. 

The Grand Z. briefly explained the difficulties that 
had arisen owing to the labor strikes in Winnipeg, thus 
preventing Grand Chapter holding its Annual Con- 
vocation in that City, as intended, in May last, when 
it was moved by R. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton, and 
seconded by M. Ex. Comp. W. S. R. Murch, and 

Fesolved, — That the action of the Grand Z. in postponing and 
changing the place of holding the Convocation of Grand Chapter 
from the City of Winnipeg to the City of Toronto, as described by 
him, be approved by this Grand Chapter. 

The Grand Z. then presented the following : 



.14 GRAND GHAPTER OF CANADA 

THE GRAND Z'S ADDRESS 

To the Officers and Companions of the Grand Chapter 
of Canada, Royal Arch Masons : 

Companions : 

I have much pleasure in extending to you a hearty 
welcome to this, the Sixty-first Annual Convocation of 
the Grand Chapter of Canada. When this address 
was first written, it was prepared as though for a Con- 
vocation in the City of Winnipeg, and it was with ex- 
ceeding regret that, owing to the labor conditions in 
that city, I found it necessary to call Grand Chapter 
in the City of Toronto. My sympathy is freely given 
to the Companions of Winnipeg, who had made 
elaborate preparations for the reception of Grand 
Chapter, and their programme of entertainment was 
one worthy of the "Gate- Way City of the West," 
but it was found to be absolutely impossible to pro- 
vide accommodation for Grand Chapter during the 
present conditions, hence the Convocation of Grand 
Chapter in the; City of Toronto. 

;-.^;' : uL ■ ' : ; The War. 

Although the heading of this paragraph is "The 
War," it is not my intention to mention the World's 
Great Struggle, but father to refer briefly, to the return 
of the Sons of Canada, who, so gallantly and gloriously 
participated in that great conflict. I wish particularly 
to interest your thoughts and sympathy for those who 
have returned, other than in a condition of physical 
fitness, and to strongly impress upon your minds, 
that the glib phrases so readily dropping from the lips 
of many people, to the effect, that the Returned Soldier 
has become unfitted by his martial life to easily resume 
his civilian duties, or that he is suffering from a general 
condition of neurasthenia, which renders him unfit 
for office work, are absolutely untrue. There is nothing 
more desired by the Returned Soldier than the privilege 
of being permitted to resume his civilian standing, with 
such assistance as may be necessary, owing to the 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 15 

particular circumstances applicable to each individual 
case. Many of these men cannot-resume their previous 
occupations, owing to disabilities- contracted while 
serving their Country's need, and provision must be 
made to- see that these boys are placed -in proper 
positions according to their abilities. The Government 
has generously provided different forms of instruction 
to enable those suffering from disabilities to embark 
upon new forms of living and methods of maintenance, 
and it is most pleasing to notice with what eagerness 
these returned boys embrace these opportunities for 
fitting themselves to become useful citizens. Never- 
theless, many of these men will never be physically 
able to take up the full duties of life, and will have to 
be content to perform such work, as may fall within 
the limit of their capacity ; for this class the Govern- 
ment has provided a pension so that they may: be, able 
to obtain the necessaries of life, and possibly some >of 
the luxuries. The question of pension is not one to 
be dealt with in this address, but it must be mentioned 
as it leads to the next step.. 

Masonic Benevolence and Charity, 

The word Charity has practically lost its meaning 
in these later days, and now seems to convey the in- 
tention of the giving of money to more or less deserving 
applicants. I totally disagree with this conception 
of the word, when applied to Masonry. To rhy^rtiihd 
it is to extend to a Brother, who is in distress >. or who 
may have done wrong, or who may have committed 
a grave crime against the laws of the country, kindly 
sympathy and assistance as may be justified in a case 
under consideration. Do not mistake my meaning, 
I am unalterably opposed to the mantle of Masonic 
Charity covering the wrong doing of any kind, either 
Masonic or civil, but, I.. think, true Masonic. Charity 
consists in a friendly interest and kindly sympathy 
to a Brother, whose pathway of life has not been of the 
rosiest, and in overlooking small personal faults 'and 
characteristic, sins of omission and commission, and 
all the frailties to which the human fleshes heir. No 



16 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

man is perfect, we have all our faults, some good in ft 
greater or less degree, some bad in a greater or less 
degree, and our Masonic Charity should pardon and 
condone to the utmost, that strict justice will permit ; 
but Masonic Benevolence is of another character, and 
brings to our minds certain definite duties, which we 
as Masons, owe to each other, and to the dependents 
of each other. Many, in fact all, Masonic Grand 
Bodies have a Rest or Reserve Fund for Brethern 
suffering from the misfortunes of life. Its adminis- 
tration is expressed in many different forms such as 
Masonic Homes, Orphan Asylums, Schools and direct 
money grants. 

It is not my purpose to discuss the different forms 
in which the dispersal of Masonic Benevolence may be 
made, because each form has many good points, but 
rather to invite your attention to the fact, that owing 
to the great number of fraternal beneficent societies, 
now operating in our Country, there seems to be a sub- 
conscious feeling, in many cases, that grants from 
Masonic Benevolent Funds are a quid pro quo for 
money paid into the Craft. This sentiment cannot be 
too strongly condemned, as grants from Masonic 
Benevolence are in no wise similar to money paid for 
insurance to the . different Fraternal Insurance Or- 
ganizations, and must ever be regarded, as one of the 
sacred privileges of Masonry, whereby the Brethren, 
freely and voluntary, extend to a needy Brother such 
help as may be needful in the time of trouble. 

I trust that I have made myself clear, because, I 
again approach the subject of the Returned Soldier. 
In this connection, the soldier who has become disabled 
will receive his pension, according to the classification 
of his disabilities. He will also be enabled, in many 
cases, to make a fair compensation by following some 
special vocation, but there still remains a class which 
will require Masonic Benevolence, and it is in behalf 
of these cases that I now ask your attention. 



It is true that the Grand Chapter of Canada has a 
Reserve Fund, but it is questionable, to my mind, if 
this Fund will be sufficient to honor the necessary 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 17 

drafts which will be made upon it in the near future. 
It is not my intention to lay before you any particular 
scheme for raising money for the Benevolent Fund of 
Grand Chapter, but merely to direct your attention 
to the fact, that we may be called upon, in the near 
future, to make a fairly substantial addition to this 
Fund. I hope that it will not be necessary to do so, 
but if the necessity arises, I entertain no doubt, but 
that the emergency will be met with that promptitude 
which has characterized our actions as Royal Arch 
Masons in the past. 



The Departed. 

Among the Companions who have died during the 
past year are : 

M. Ex. Comp. John Ross Robertson, Grand Z., 
in 1893-4, died, May 31st, 1918, Up to the time 
of his death our late Companion took an active interest 
in the welfare of Royal Arch Masonry. As a Masonic 
authority, he was recognized the world over, and his 
presence at our Annual Convocations will be sadly 
missed. He has departed to his eternal reward, but 
his memory will be long cherished by those who knew 
him in life, . 

R. Ex, Comp. Isaac Huber, Grand Superintendent, 
Georgian District, No. 9, in 1896-7 ; died, July 20th, 
1918. Comp. Huber took a keen interest in all branches 
of Masonry up to the day of his death, and his loss 
will long be felt by the Companions of the District. 

R. Ex. Comp. John B. Brennan, Grand Registrar, 
in 1916-7, died, January 26th> 1919. He was a keen 
Ritualist and a devoted Mason, and those who knew 
him will long hold his memory in honor and esteem. 

V. Ex. Comp. Sydney A. Luke, Past Grand Director 
of Ceremonies, in 1896-7, died November 23rd, 1918. 
He was a Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of 
Canada, in the Province of Ontario. A strong worker 



18 9 : ? GRKNE* CHAPTER OF -CANADA ■ '. h 

in all branches of Masonry, and a delightful Companion 
to meet. 

Other Companions have died, and their names 
will appear in these Proceedings. 

Honor Roll. 

In this year's Proceedings will appear as last year, 
the names of the Companions who have been reported 
to the Grand Scribe E's office as having enlisted for 
Overseas Service. Among the names will be seen many 
brave Canadian soldiers who paid the "Price," while 
engaged in the noble cause of defeating the foe of the 
Central Powers of Europe. 

Canadian Jurisdiction. 

Nova Scotia — M. Ex. Comp. Luther Bracette 
Archibald, P.G.H.P. died, February 10th, 1918. 
He was born at Truro, N.S., April 12th, 1849, and 
spent nearly his whole life there. Comp. Archibald 
was prominently connected with all branches of 
Masonry. 

Fraternal Dead from American Jurisdictions. 

The Grand Jurisdictions of the United States, 
during the past year, have lost by death, so we have 
been informed, the following prominent. Companions : 

Alabama— George Alburtus Joiner, Past Grand 
Secretary. 

California—Charles Willis Norton, P.G.H.P.; 
Charles Fayette Lott, P.G.H.P. 

Colorado— George D. Kennedy, P.G.H.P. 

Georgia — Marshall Atkinson Weir, Grand Treasurer. 

Illinois— Marcus M. Lord, P.G.H.P. 
. Iowa— Isaac T. Forbes, P.G.H.P. 

Kansas— Matthew Murray Miller, P.G.H.P. 

Maine— Stephen Berry, Grand Secretary Emeritus. 

Maryland— -Charles Beatty Finley, P.G.H.P. • - 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 19 

Michigan— Reuben Charles Webb, P.G.H.P. 

Minnesota— Giles William Merrill, P.G.H.P. , 
Nathan Kingsley, P.G.H.P. 

Nebraska — rFrank Henrv Orcutt Young, P.G.H.P.; 
Julius J. Wilson, P.G.H.P. 

Nevada—Enoch Strother, P.G.H.P. 

New Jersey — Louis A. Menegaux, D.G.H.P. 

Ohio — Lewis Mackay Lea, P.G.H.P.; Ralph 
Reamer Rickly, Grand Treasurer. 

South Carolina — Robert Edward Turnipseed, Grand 
Chaplain. 

Texas— William Anderson Scott, P.G.H.P.; John 
P. Bell, P.G.H.P.; Samuel May Williams, P.G.H.P. 

Utah— Birt Griffin Blackman, P.G.H.P. 



The Proposed Grand Chapter of British Columbia; 

About the middle of February last, I received a 
Communication from M. Ex. Comp. Henry Watson 
of Vancouver, British Columbia, in which he stated, 
that a movement was on foot to form a Grand Chapter 
of Royal Arch Masons in the Province of British 
Columbia. A copy of the circular letter issued by 
M. ~Ex. Comp. Watson was enclosed with the Com- 
munication. Two extracts from the letter are as 
follows : 

" M, Ex. Comp. Watson asked the Principals 
and. Past Principals of Vancouver, New West- 
minister and North Vancouver, to meet him in- : 
formally and talk the matter over. This informal 
meeting took place on the 30th of January, at 
which tHere were an attendance of twenty-seven 

... Principals, and apologies for unavoidable absence, 
were sent by many others. It was the unanimous 
opinion of the meeting, that a Grand Chapter for the 
Province should be formed, and that M. Ex. Comp. v 
Watson should commence with the Chapters in 
British Columbia, asking them to participate 

• "in the movement. If this communication should. •- 



20 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

meet with a favorable response, that matter will 
be at once taken up with the Grand Chapter of 
Canada, and steps to form a Grand Chapter in 
British Columbia will be inaugurated." 

"We desire to do all with the full consent and 
approval of the Grand Chapter of Canada, and 
we have every reason to believe that no objection 
will be made by that Grand Chapter to a friendly 
separation, and that we shall be able to work with 
the Grand Chapter of Canada for the benefit of 
Capitular Masonry in Canada." 

As the Grand Chapter of Canada had already 
placed itself on record, regarding the formation of 
Grand Chapters in the different provinces, which 
declaration will be found on page 206, of the Grand 
Chapter Proceedings, 1917, it was with much pleasure 
that I replied, to M, Ex. Comp. Watson, wishing him 
and the Companions of British Columbia every success 
in their endeavors, and assuring them that they would 
meet with nothing, but the kindest of fraternal good 
will from the Grand Chapter of Canada. I also drew 
his attention to the fact, that he was to be particularly 
careful that every Chapter in British Columbia was 
represented by a duly accredited representative. 

Grand Chapter of Canada. 

I have no doubt you will be greatly pleased to knew 
that the affairs of our Grand Chapter are in an excellent 
condition. The interim reports of the Grand Superin- 
tendents are most optimistic in tone ; all report steady 
and substantial progress, and from a perusal of their 
annual statements which will be submitted to Grand 
Chapter you will find, that their predictions have been 
verified. In many respects this has been the most 
successful year in the History of Grand Chapter, 
and too much credit cannot be given to the excellent 
work of the Grand Scribe E. and the Grand Superin- 
tendents, for their unsparing efforts in the interests of 
Grand Chapter. As for myself., while endeavoring to 
maintain a general supervision over matters connected 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 21 

with the office of Grand Z., I was absolutely unable to 
leave the Military District with which I have been and 
am now so closely connected. Were the reasons which 
detained me other than National and Patriotic, I 
would do nothing but apologize most sincerely to 
Grand Chapter, but owing to peculiar conditions, and 
more especially to the sudden return of troops from 
overseas in large numbers, the service of a man in my 
peculiar capacity was absolutely indispensable, and it 
so happened that in Military District No. 12, I was 
the only officer of sufficient standing and experience 
available for the work which is still very pressing and 
needful. The Constituent Chapters have not lost 
much, but I feel that my personal loss, by being 
deprived of the privilege of making visits to the Prin- 
cipal centres, can never be made up to me. 

The Sash. 

At the last Convocation of Grand Chapter, at which 
the Constitution was revised, legislation was passed 
obliterating the Sash from the Regalia worn by Royal 
Arch Masons. This action has been strongly resented 
in many portions of the Grand Jurisdiction, and a 
Notice of Motion has already been placed upon the 
Agenda Paper, asking that the legislation of last year 
be reconsidered and the Sash restored. I trust that 
this will be given complete and full consideration, 
that the debate upon the question will be final, and that 
every member of Grand Chapter who .desires to do so 
will express his personal opinion upon the question. 

Appointments. 

Vacancies having occurred in the Representations 
of other Grand Bodies near the Grand Chapter of 
Canada, I recommended the Companions named, 
which were approved : 

Alberta — R. Ex. Comp. J. K. Brydon, Kenora, 
Ontario. 

California — R. Ex. Comp. J. W. Rogers, Toronto, 
Ontario. 



22 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Colorado — R. Ex. Comp. James McC. Potts, 
Stirling, Ontario. 

Louisiana — R. Ex. Comp. William Young Mills, 
Kingston, Ontario. 

New South Wales — R. Ex. Comp. Francis B. 
Reilly, Regina, Sask. 

New York— M. Ex. Comp. F. W. Harcourt, 
Toronto, Ontario. 

Oregon — R. Ex. Comp. D. A. Clark, Ottawa, 
Ontario. 

Vacancies having occurred in the representation of 
the Grand Chapter of Canada near the other Grand 
Bodies, I approved of the following recommendations : 

Florida — R, Ex. Comp. Chester De Rocher, Braden- 
town. 

Illinois — R. Ex. Comp. Frank Spencer, Cairo. 
Iowa — R. Ex. Comp. D. B. Aylesworth, Eldora. 
Nova Scotia— R. Ex. Comp. G. S. Wright, Halifax. 
Texas — R. Ex. Comp. B. K. Hawkins, Brown wood. 

I received the resignation of R. Ex. Comp. William 
Rea, Grand Representative of Alabama, near the 
Grand Chapter of Canada, owing to the R. Ex. Com- 
panion having to leave Toronto, Ontario, because of 
the illness of Mrs. Rea, for the purpose of residing 
with his daughter in Westfield, New York. After 
considering th^e matter carefully, I decided not to accept 
the resignation, because of the valued services which 
had been rendered in past years by R. Ex. Comp, 
Rea to both Symbolic and Capitular Masonry. I am 
pleased to say that , circumstances will again permit 
R. Ex. Comp. Rea to resume his residence in the City 
of Toronto, and to carry on his duties as the Grand 
Representative of the Grand Jurisdiction .of Alabama. 

Courtesies. 
There have been extended, during the past year, 
several courtesies between Chapters* belonging to 
American Jurisdictions and those of our own in con- 
ferring degrees upon brethren who have made the 
request. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION,- TORONTO; 1919 23 

Dispensations a^d By-laws. 
■ ■ ■ ' ■ . . . - - 

During the year Dispensations have been issued 
for the formation of two New Chapters, one at Tjmmins, 
Ontario, to be called "The Northern Lights," and the 
other at Inwood, Ontario, to be called "Vimy." A 
number of other Dispensations have been issued, 
as well as By-laws and amendments thereto which have 
been presented for approval, reference to which will be 
found in the report of the Grand Scribe E. 

Supreme Grand Chapter of Queensland, 
Australia. 

A Communication was received from the Supreme 
Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Queensland, asking for 
fraternal recognition. The Communication has been 
placed in the hands of the Chairman of Fraternal Cor- 
respondence and he will no doubt make special report 
to this Grand Body concerning the matter. 

Rulings. 

1. The question was asked, if a Companion who was 
suspended for non-payment of dues in December 1913, 
and at the time of his suspension owed dues to the 
amount of $4.75, was he liable for and should he pay 
the dues intervening, from 1913 to 1918, before he could 
be reinstated. 

If the Companion, I ruled, paid the amount due at 
the time of his suspension, he should be re-admitted 
to his Chapter without the payment of the dues for 
subsequent years. 

2. I was asked, if the examination of a Candidate 
in the Mark and Most Excellent degrees should take 
place in open Lodge, and if it was not the duty of the 
Master, Senior and Junior Wardens, besides one of 
the Past Z's, to examine the Candidates. 

1 decided that the examination was to be held in 
open Lodge by the officers ruling the Lodge. 

3. The question was also asked, if a newly installed 
Z. failed to appoint' the officers of the Chapter such as 
Veilsmen, Overseers, etc., on the night of. Installation 
would that not constitute an illegal Installation. * 



24 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

I ruled that the failure of the newly Installed Z., 
to announce the selection of his appointed officers, 
on the night of Installation, did not render the In- 
stallation illegal. 

4. Three questions were submitted, which are set 
forth with the answers given : 

(a) "No Chapter shall be opened unless there are 
present nine Royal Arch Masons, etc," — I am ua* 
decided as to what constitutes a quorum for the Mark 
Master and Most Excellent Master degrees. Does 
this clause of the Constitution mean, that nine Royal 
Arch Masons must be present to constitute a quorum 
for the Mark Master and Most Excellent Master 
degree ? 

Ans. — Three rule a Lodge ; five hold a Lodge ; 
seven or more make it perfect in Symbolic Ma- 
sonry, but in Capitular Masonry I rule that there 
must be, to make it legal, nine members present at a 
meeting of Mark Master Masons, and Most Excellent 
Master Masons as provided by the Constitution. 

(6) .Is it permissible to confer any, part, or all of 
the Work of the Mark Master and Most Excellent 
Master degrees, on more than one candidate, at one 
and the same time ? If so, at what point in each of 
these degrees is such action allowable ? 

Ans.- — It is not contemplated, that more than one 
Candidate should receive the degrees at the same time, 
n6r is any provision made for so doing. Custom, 
however, has countenanced the entrance of an unlimited 
number of Candidates for the Most Excellent Master's 
degree, and I think this may be continued. In the 
Mark Master degree tme Candidate only, should be 
admitted, until after the -obligation. 

(c) At what point in the order of conducting the 
Most Excellent Master Lodge and Royal Arch Chapter 
should a Candidate be examined as to his proficiency 
in the preceding degree ? 

Ans. — Candidates should be examined for pro- 
ficiency in the Mark Master Masons' degree in a Lodge 
opened in that degree. Likewise in the Most Excellent 
Master degree before advancement. The time of 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 25 

doing so would appropriately be immediately after 
the opening of the Chapter. 

5. The Grand Scribe E., of the Grand Chapter of 
Alberta wrote to our Grand Scribe E., saying : 

. " A short time ago an application for Exaltation 
was received by Capital City Chapter, No. 13. 
G.R.A., of Edmonton, from Bro. A. C. Minty of 
Union Lodge No. 9, G.R.B.C. of Fort George, B.C, 

"Unfortunately this Brother's application had 
been balloted on by the Companions of the Chapter 
before they realized that they were violating the 
Jurisdiction of the Grand Chapter of Canada, but 
have now requested me to obtain permission from- 
the Grand Chapter of Canada to confer the degree 
on Bro. Minty. 

"As there is no Royal Arch Chapter between 
Edmonton and Prince Rupert, and as Edmonton is 
much more convenient for Bro. Minty, it is respect- 
fully requested that the Grand Chapter of Canada 
waive jurisdiction in this case, and allow Capital 
City Chapter the privilege of conferring the degrees 
on this Brother. 

" In this connection I am issuing a circular letter 
to all Chapters in this Jurisdiction so that similar 
cases will not occur." 

I directed the following reply to be written, respect- 
ing the Petition for Exaltation of Bro. A. C. Minty, 
that if he was a resident of the Province of Alberta, 
he is the material of that Grand Chapter, but if he is a 
resident of British Columbia, he is the material of the 
Grand Chapter of Canada, and the Chapters nearest 
his. place of residence should be consulted and Juris- 
diction waived. :U 

6. The following questions were also submitted for 
my consideration, to which is set forth my answers : 

(a) Is it permissible to confer the Royal Arch degree 
on more than three Candidates at one and the same 
time ? ' 

Ans.— It is permissible to confer the Royal Arch 
"degree on more than three Candidates at one and the 



26 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

same time, provided the Candidates are conducted in 
lots of three, and in no other manner. 

(b) Is it permissible for the chief Presiding Officer, 
in any of the three degrees, to dispense with the opening 
and closing ceremonies by ruling that the body as- 
sembled will open or close "without ceremony," in 
order to avoid detaining the Brethren to a very late 
hour when the evening's work is particularly heavy ? 

Ans. — It is not permissible for any Presiding Officer, 
except the Grand Z. to close any Lodge or Chapter 
without the full ceremony. 

(c) How often during his term of office must a 
Second or Third Principal occupy his seat of office 
in the Royal Arch degree to entitle him to promotion at 
the Annual Elections ? 

Ans. — Every officer in a Chapter occupies his 
position until his successor has been elected and in- 
stalled or invested. No Companion is entitled to 
promotion, but givea such by the votes of his Com- 
panions 

7. The question was asked whether demits could be 
issued while a Chapter was closed for four or five 
months. 

A Chapter, I ruled, must meet every three months, 
and that no demits could be issued unless passed upon 
in open Chaptep*. That is, if a Chapter did not meet, 
then demits could not be issued, and if the Chapter 
became dormant only the Grand Scribe E. was qualified 
to issue demits. 

8. A Chapter in British Columbia having become 
dormant, the question was asked as to the standing of 
the members whose names appeared upon the books of 
that Chapter. 

After reading Section 248, page 64, of the Con- 
sitution (1918), I decided that the Companions of a 
dormant Chapter whose books had been returned to 
the office of the Grand Scribe E., and who are found 
clear on the books, or who subsequently made good all 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 27 

arrearages up to the time the Chapter became dormant , 
should be furnished with a Certificate of Standing by 
the Grand Scribe E. 

9. I was asked whether a Brother, a member of a 
Lodge in Toronto, who has served his King and Country 
in the Great War, and having lost one of his legs, was 
eligible to become a member of a Chapter. 

My answer was, that any Master Mason of good 
character and sound mind was not debarred from 
advancement in Royal Arch Masonry on account of 
physical disability acquired, after his admission to 
Symbolic Masonry. 

What of the Future ? 

The War is over, but the problems arising from that 
conflict are an ominous cloud, whose centre may contain 
death and distinction, and he would, indeed, be wanting 
in judgment, who would deny, that these problems 
bear the seed of future prosperity, or dismembrance of 
the Social Status of our whole country. The glib 
phrase of Reconstruction, so aptly coined by interested 
politicians, and the attempted divergence of the 
intelligence of the country, into by-ways of misdirected 
energy, are bewildering to the ordinary citizen. It 
cannot be denied that a great unrest is upon us. Nine- 
tenths of the population of this country are unsettled 
and disquieted. The great accumulation of riches by 
certain portions of the population, and the increasingly 
difficult endeavors of the ordinary citizen to make a 
living, for himself and family, are producing a spirit 
of discontent entirely foreign to the past. Never were 
Capital and Labor so widely separated and the agricul- 
turalist has now entered the field as a unit in antagonism 
to both. The great underlying principle which actuated 
those who went overseas to fight our country's battles 
was Service. They gave up their to-day for our to- 
morrow. It would indeed be a sad commentary, if 
their great sacrifices were to produce a discontented and 
disunited people. Our country still requires this 
Service, not on the battlefield, but in the ranks of the 
true patriots, who are honestly endeavoring to reconcile 
the discordant elements in our countrv, whose activities 



28 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

lie at the root of our present discontent. It is the duty 
of every good citizen to lend his intelligence to the 
uttermost for the solving of these problems, which are 
now facing us, and by an honest effort endeavor to 
bring form out of chaos. 

I am frankly afraid of the future. It would be 
rash to deny that all sorts of heterodoxy is being 
preached throughout the land, socialism, extreme 
radicalism and the doctrines of the Bolshevik find 
their expounders in every place where men are gathered 
together, on the street corners, in the corridors of our 
public buildings, in our railway carriages ; every day, 
may be heard, outspoken exponents of these ideas, 
and our country requires the service of the large brains, 
and level heads, of her foremost men to curb the dan- 
gerous propaganda. Masonry as Masonry, must not, 
and I trust will not, enter into this turmoil of unrest, 
but that her teachings will be made manifest in in- 
dividual Masons who, acting in their capacity as 
citizens, of this great country, must set themselves 
against the cry of the mob, which howls to down those 
who are responsible for direction of affairs and they 
must be equally resistant to the arrogant assumption 
of power in the hands of a few. Pure Democracy 
is the Government of the people, by the will of the 
people, and any departure from this law leads to 
Autocracy or mob rule. 

A country can become too prosperous and suffer 
from dry rot, because the people in their prosperity 
become slothfully, indolent and indifferent to the 
manner, in which they are governed, and it is proved 
to be true in the history of all nations, that designing 
men seize the reigns of power for their own personal 
aggrandizement, a,nd to the profit of a certain class 
or set, to Which they may belong. On the other hand, 
a country may become too poor, owing to the. indiffer- 
ence and ignorance of the population, which condition 
always leads to rebellion, murder and destruction. It 
is not my intention to say that our country, is, at the 
present time, at either i extremity, but great; countries 
havebeen destroyed by the indifference ^1- its people, 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 29 

and I would ask you to pause and think upon the 
future and where we are drifting. 

Conclusion. 

I now lay down the gavel of authority, which you so 
generously placed in my hand, with the hope, that you 
will look leniently upon the many instances, in which I 
have fallen short of my full Masonic duty. My heart 
and my inclination were always to be up and doing, 
but my restrictions proved to be dominant, and I have 
left undone some very important things which I should 
have done. Royal Arch Masonry has prospered and 
prospered greatly, during the six years which I have 
been a member of the Grand Council. Those true 
and enthusiastic Brethren, many of whom are now 
present, whose sustained efforts in the affairs of Grand 
Chapter, and the younger Companions, who have 
become imbued with the true spirit of the Royal Craft, 
are to be congratulated. I feel, that, in laying down 
this gavel, to be committed to the hands of such 
eminent Royal Arch Masons, as the Grand Second 
and Third Principals, the Grand Chapter of Canada 
will continue its honored advancement, shedding light 
in the pathway of Capitular Masonry, and contributing 
its disinterested benevolence to the welfare of those 
needy ones who are members of the Household of the 
Faithful. 

For what you have done I thank you. I trust 
human frailty may never cause me to be unworthy of 
the great honor, and assure you that the Companions 
of Western Canada have appreciated the fact that one 
of their number has been selected, by you, to preside 
over this August Assembly. One more word and I 
am done. 

You will note in this address, that I have made no 
mention of the increase in membership of Grand 
Chapter, our financial condition, approval of By-laws, 
and such other matters, because, I am convinced that 



30 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

these should be first announced in the reports of the 
officers whose dutv it is to deal with such. 



Fraternally submitted, 




iX Grand Z. 



It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton^ 
seconded by M. Ex. Comp. W. S. R. Murch, and 

Resolved, — That the address of the M. Ex., the Grand Z., be 
referred to the Executive Committee to report thereon during the 
present Convocation of Grand Chapter. 



Grand Superintendents' Reports 

The Reports of the Grand Superintendents of Dis- 
tricts were then presented. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 19N 31 



ST. CLAIR DISTRICT, No. 1. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have the honor to submit my report on the con- 
dition of Capitular Masonry in St. Clair District, No. 1. 

It was necessary for me to make my visits mostly 
continuous, for several reasons, first, in the early part 
of my year I waited for good roads so that I might go 
to the different Chapters by automobile. When this 
time arrived, sickness visited my family and the death 
of my mother, and afterwards business became so 
pressing, that I could not see my way clear to go, 
then in the early fall, as you know, the influenza plague 
caused all the Chapters to withdraw Convocations. 
Then to make matters still -worse, in December I was 
taken to bed with the "flu," for at this late date in the 
year I had intended visiting a number of the Chapters 
and was again disappointed. When however, I got 
able to again go out, I arranged it so that I met the 
several Chapters in the month of February, as you will 
learn from the dates of each visit. 

I visited every Chapter in the District, and was 
received in a most kindly way. I think Capitular 
Masonry is progressing favorably considering that the 
war was at its highest point during the year 1918, and 
added to this the "plague" that was everywhere 
abroad. 

The Scribes E. of all the Chapters, with the excep- 
tion of Prince of Wales (and this was later put into 
effect) responded to the request, that they send me 
notices of their respective Convocations, so that I could 
keep in touch with them and know when I could meet 
them. However, I have had a great deal of pleasure 
in corresponding with each Chapter, although I could 
not meet them earlier, as above stated. 



32 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

When on my official visits I arranged for a Chapter 
of Instruction, which was held under Wellington 
Chapter, on the 25th of March, this proved to be a grand 
success, and all the Chapters of the District werewell 
represented, with the exception of Lome and King 
Cyrus. I knew beforehand that Lome Chapter would 
not be represented, but I was disappointed when King 
Cyrus Chapter failed to be represented. 

The Mark Master Mason degree was exemplified 
by the officers of Prince of Wales Chapter, No. 71, in a 
manner that was appreciated by all present. 

The Most Excellent Master degree was exemplified 
by Erie Chapter, No. 73. At the last minute, a part 
of the officers of this Chapter were unable to be present,, 
the vacancies being taken by others, and as is. their 
usual way, the work was well done. 

The Royal Arch degree was exemplified by Ark 
Chapter No. 80, and needless to say, they did the work 
faultless. This Chapter, of course, has had lots of work 
to db which keeps it in good working order. 

The banquet furnished by Wellington Chapter, 
and the entertainment which followed, did credit to 
the committee, and I must add, that it is to be con- 
gratulated for making the Chapter of Instruction the 
success which it attained, for when I named the com- 
mittee I thought I had made no mistake, which I am 
glad to report. 

Wellington Chapter, No. 47, Chatham.—! 
visited Wellington Chapter, No. 47 on the 13th of 
February. The officers conferred the Mark Master 
Mason degree in a splendid way, showing that they 
knew the work well and in a manner pleasing to all. 
Ex. Comp. Burch, First Principal, on behalf of the 
Companions, welcomed me, and at the close of the work, 
a banquet was in waiting in their splendid quarters, 
adjoining the Chapter room. The toasts were responded 
to: by several Companions but, the climax was the 
toast responded by Ex. Comp. Pike; This address 
was splendid throughout, and no doubt will long be 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 33 

remembered by all present. Ex. Comps. Lindsay and 
Smith also made personal reference to Capitular 
Masonry. 

Prince of Wales Chapter, No. 71, Amherst- 
burg. — I visited Prince of Wales Chapter on February 
12th, and the Mark Master Mason degree was con- 
ferred in a pleasing manner. This Chapter had been 
closed for a while, on account of the "flu," but the 
officers were an active lot of Companions, and I anti- 
cipate better results for the present year. The officers 
assured me they were in better "fettle" than for some 
time. I was treated in a most pleasant way. 

Erie Chapter, No. 73, Ridgetown. — I visited 
Erie Chapter, No. 73, Ridgetown, on February 18th, 
on the occasion the officers conferred the Mark Master 
Mason degree, the attendance was fair, and the degree 
was conferred in good form, still there was the effects 
of the long lapse of Convocations not being held caused 
by the "flu," and death had taken off the Scribe E., 
Comp. Ellsworth. His death caused my correspondence 
to be answered by the First Principal Ex. Comp Wm. 
Bressey, whom I knew when a child, but had lost all 
trace of him up to this time, and I was glad to meet 
him again. At the close of the Convocation a nice lunch 
was served. 

Ark Chapter, No. 80, Windsor. — My visit to this 
Chapter was a most enjoyable one. First Principal 
Ex. Comp. Sansburn met me at the G.T.R. Station, 
and we proceeded to the hotel where I stayed while in 
Windsor. This is the largest Chapter in the District 
as you will see by the returns, and the officers of this 
Chapter are a really active lot, and do their work well. 
On this occasion they conferred the Mark Master 
Mason degree, and needless to say, they have had 
plenty of work and the degree was splendidly per- 
formed. You need not wonder from what I say, why I 
chose the officers of this Chapter to confer the Royal 
Arch degree at the Chapter of Instruction. The 
Companions of Ark Chapter are contemplating the 
building of a Temple to give them more room, and also 



34 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

more evenings in order to keep up with the growth of 
the Chapter, for in their present quarters they can only- 
have certain nights to meet. This Chapter is blessed 
with a goodly number of Past Grand Superintendents, 
and it is only necessary for the officers to say, to any 
of these Companions, we want you to-night, and they 
are ready to render any assistance necessary. The 
Immediate Past Grand Superintendent, Ex. Comp. 
A. E. Edgar is at hand any time and this helps to keep 
matters on the move. 

MacNabb Chapter, No. 88, Dresden. — This 
Chapter is my home Chapter and I rarely miss a 
Convocation, but, on my official visit, March 20th, 
the officers conferred the Most Excellent degree in a 
manner to be proud of. I think I never saw it done 
better with Ex. Comp. Bedell as Worshipful Master. 
This Ex. Companion always does his best to promote 
Capitular Masonry, while his assistants were in good 
"fettle." This Chapter has felt the effects of the war, 
and later the "flu," and I have no doubt that now, 
this trouble has passed, better prospects are ahead 
for it. 

King Cyrus, No. 119, Leamington. — I visited this 
Chapter, February 11th, and found it in a fair way of 
success, although I was informed that a great number of 
the Companions after getting through the Chapter, 
joined the Preceptory and neglected the Chapter. 
This I did not like to learn, for I do not think this 
should be ; however, I asked if the Companions 
could not make the Chapter more attractive and 
interesting to the wayward members to return. I think 
this lack of interest in a measure accounts for the 
number being in arrears for dues. After the Chapter 
had been closed, the officers opened in the Mark Master 
Mason degree, and a candidate was conducted through 
this degree in a splendid way, which shows that the 
Companions that do attend take interest in the work. 
I was glad to meet Comps. Willson and Wright, who 
I have known for a long time. They are quite active 
in the welfare of Capitular Masonry. After closing 
this Mark Master Mason degree the Companions 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 35 

proceeded to the banquet hall and enjoyed a splendid 
chicken supper. 

Lorne Chapter, No. 164, West Lorne. — I visited 
this Chapter, February 19th. This Chapter seems 
to have lost enthusiasm from some cause, and as in the 
former instance it appears to be passing from Capitular 
Masonry to the Preceptory. There was no degree 
work done on my visit, and I was sorry for this as I 
would like to have seen one of the degrees worked, and 
while it was understood I was to be there, the notices 
did not mention the fact. I also called the attention 
of the Companions of the necessity of creating some 
means for getting the Companions to attend the Con- 
vocation, and I trust they will profit by my suggestions. 

In conclusion, you will notice that with the exception 
of MacNabb Chapter conferring the Most Excellent 
degree, West Lorne none, all the other Chapters con- 
ferred the Mark Master Mason degree. The officers of 
the Chapters like this degree. However, I was some- 
what disappointed in not seeing the Royal Arch con- 
ferred. I was well received by all the Chapters and the 
Companions accorded to me the most courteous re- 
ception, and I trust the year 1919 will be a banner year 
for Capitular Masonry in this District. 



Fraternally submitted, 

Francis Hindell Laird, 
Grand Supt. t St. Clair District, No. i, 



Dresden, Ont. 



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ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 37 

LONDON DISTRICT No. 2. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have the honor to submit for your approval my 
report on the condition of Capitular Masonry in London 
District, No. 2 for the year 1918-1919. 

All the Chapters I visited in London District, No. 2, 
(excepting Bruce Chapter) during my term of office 
as Grand Superintendent, and found nearly all the 
Chapters doing excellent work in strict conformity 
to the ritual. Peace and harmony are the prevailing 
features of the District, and have been during the whole 
of the past year. 

One new Chapter has been opened in the District 
under dispensation, at Inwood, Ont., and I have every 
reason to believe, that this new Chapter will be a credit 
to Capitular Masonry, as the officers are both clever 
and energetic. 

Sombra Chapter, No. 153, Sombra. — On Friday, 
March 29th, I paid my official visit to Sombra Chapter, 
and found everything in first-class order, with plenty 
of work ahead of us. The Mark Master Mason, Most 
Excellent Master and Royal Arch degrees were con- 
ferred by the following officers : Ex. Comp. R. A. 
Stokes conferred the Mark Master degree on five 
candidates, the Most Excellent Master's degree was 
conferred by Ex. Comp. W. R. Stokes, and the Royal 
Arch degree by Ex. Comp. Selman. This work was 
done in an excellent manner. I, on invitation from the 
First Principal, assisted in the work by giving the 
Mystical Lecture. The Chapter is in a first-class 
condition. The books are well kept and very neat, 
and much of the success is due to the very efficient 
Scribe E., Comp. W. W. Stover, who has assisted to 
build up a Chapter in the village of ninety-one paying 
members. 



38 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Beaver Chapter, No. 74, Strathroy. — On May 
6th, 1918, I made my official visit to my home Chapter, 
Beaver, No. 74. The attendance was good, and the 
officers enthusiastic. The work for the evening was 
the conferring of the Most Excellent Master degree on 
two candidates. The First Principal, Ex. Comp. R. F. 
Richardson, examined the candidates in the Mark 
Master degree, then received and acknowledged 
them as Most Excellent Masters in a manner which 
was above criticism. The Chapter is making steady 
progress, notwithstanding the fact that nearly all the 
members live outside the town, and many in other towns 
and cities all over Canada and the United States. 

Aylmer Chapter, No. 81, Aylmer. — I visited this 
Chapter on May 31st, and together we had a very 
pleasant and profitable evening. Several Companions 
motored from St. Thomas, members of Palestine 
Chapter, No. 54, showing the fraternal spirit which 
exists between these Chapters, a spirit which should 
at all times characterize Freemasons. This made our 
Convocation very enjoyable. The work of the evening 
was the conferring of the Mark Master Mason degree, 
which was conferred in a perfect manner by the officers 
of the Chapter. Too much credit cannot be given, 
especially to the junior officers, for the interest they 
take in degree work. Aylmer Chapter will prosper. 

London Chapter, No. 150, London. — I visited 
this Chapter officially on June 18th, accompanied by 
Comps. E. R. McNeill and Tom Wilson of Beaver 
Chapter, and as usual received a hearty reception 
from the officers and members of London Chapter. 
The Mark Master Mason degree was conferred in a 
very able manner, showing that this Chapter, though 
young in years, has made proper use of its time, 
and therefore deserves as much praise as the older 
Chapters. After the work of the evening was com- 
pleted, we retired to the banquet hall where a very 
pleasant hour was spent. I feel certain that London 
Chapter will make progress. 

St. George's Chapter, No. 5, London. — Friday, 
May 24th, was selected for my official visit to St. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 39 

George's Chapter, London. I was accompanied 
by Ex. Comp. Robert Latimer, Third Principal, and 
Comp. E. R. McNeill, P.S. of Beaver Chapter, No. 74. 
An Emergent Meeting was opened at 2.30 p.m., when 
the Mark Master, and the Most Excellent Master 
degrees were conferred on eight candidates, by Ex. 
Comp. Livermore and R. Ex. Comp. Edwin Smith, 
respectively. The Lodge was called from labor to 
refreshment, and at 7.30, the Chapter was opened in 
the Royal Arch degree, when R. Ex. Comp. Henry T. 
Smith, Grand Scribe E.; R. Ex. Comp. Edwin Smith, 
Grand Scribe N., and your humble servant, were in- 
troduced and received with Grand honors. The 
Chapter immediately proceeded with the work of the 
evening, the conferring of the Royal Arch degree on 
nine candidates. The Ex. First Principal Ex. Comp. 
W. A. Odell, occupied the chair, and much praise is 
due him and his officers for the able and efficient manner 
in which the work was done. The Mystical Lecture 
was delivered by R. Ex. Comp. Geo. E. Logan, in a 
very perfect and impressive manner. The Chapter 
books are kept in good order by Ex. Comp. T. S. 
Elliott, Scribe E. At the conclusion of the degree 
work, R. Ex. Comp. Henry T. Smith, Grand S.E., gave 
an educational lecture on Capitual Masonry, which 
was very instructive and highly appreciated, This 
Chapter's prospects are exceedingly bright, and every- 
thing pertaining to it very encouraging. 

Palestine Chapter, No. 54, St. Thomas. — My 
official visit was made to the Chapter on June 13th. 
I was accompanied by Ex. Comps. R. F. Richardson, 
First Principal, Robert Latimer, Third Principal, and 
Comp. McNeill, P.S., all of Beaver Chapter, No. 74. 
We were received with great cordiality. The work 
of the evening was the conferring of the Royal Arch 
degree on nine candidates. The First Principal Ex. 
Comp. M. Mclntyre, and officers conferred the degree 
in a very able and impressive manner. The work of 
the Principal Sojourner was worthy of the highest 
commendation. The lectures were all given word 
perfect and in a manner which made a lasting impres. 



40 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

sion on the candidates. The books are well kept and 
the finances are in good condition, as one would expect 
with the work in the hands of V. Ex. Comp. Idsardi, 
who has been Scribe E. of this Chapter for many years. 

Wawanosh Chapter, No. 15, Sarnia. — I visited 
this Chapter at their regular Convocation on February 
14th. I was received by the First Principal and Com- 
panions with the utmost courtesy and cordiality, and 
was royally entertained during my visit. There was a 
large attendance, with sociability, and all other things 
which go to make Chapter Convocations successful. 
The Mark Master Mason degree was conferred on four 
candidates by the First Principal Ex. Comp. J. E. B. 
Phelps, and his officers. The whole work was a credit 
to Royal Arch Masonry, and I was very pleased to be 
present and witness the degrees conferred in such a 
perfect manner. This Chapter is in good hands and is 
making great progress. 

Minnewawa Chapter, No. 78, Parkhill. — Ac- 
companied by the officers of Beaver Chapter, No. 74, 
Strathroy, I made my official visit to this Chapter on 
November 15th, and found a good number of members 
present, as the roads were in grand condition for motor- 
ing. Ex. Comp. Zaphe occupied the chair. This Chapter 
had a candidate for the Royal Arch degree, which was 
conferred by the officers of Beaver Chapter. Minne- 
wawa Chapter has been very unfortunate in latter 
years, as many of their members are away from Park- 
hill, some having gone overseas to assist in the battle 
for freedom and have not yet returned, and, therefore, 
it has been very difficult for the remaining members 
to get a quorum so as to hold a meeting. The work of 
Beaver Chapter officers made a great impression on the 
members of this Chapter, who were present, and, I 
believe, it will result in Parkhill Companions being 
more zealous in thei." work, and I trust that this Chapter 
will in future make some progress. After considerable 
discussion we adjourned to the banquet hall where a 
very pleasant hour was spent. 

Vimy Chapter, No. U.D.,Inwood. — On March 17th, 
•I visited this baby Chapter and presented them with 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 41 

the dispensation. There were ten members in attend- 
ance. The night was wet and the roads very bad. 
The First Principal, Ex. Comp. Campbell, and his 
officers, opened the Chapter and also opened a Lodge of 
Mark Master Masons, and a Lodge of Most Excellent 
Masters, in a manner which would make many older 
Chapters feel ashamed, as the officers of the new 
Chapter did their work faultlessly. Applications were 
received from eleven candidates. I have every reason 
to believe that this Chapter will make a mark in 
Capitular Masonry during the next year so that when 
it receives its Warrant it will have a strong 
membership of Chapter Masons who will do their 
work without error. 

Bruce Chapter, No. 53, Petrolea. — I found it 
impossible to make arrangements to visit this Chapter. 
They held very few meetings during the year, and they 
found it impossible to hold a meeting when I could 
attend. 

St. John's Chapter, No. 3, London. — On October 
23rd, accompanied by Ex. Comp. Forsyth and Comp. 
McNeill of Beaver Chapter, No. 74, I made my official 
visit to St. John's Chapter, and we were warmly re- 
ceived by the First Principal and Companions. The 
Royal Arch degree was conferred in a very able and 
impressive manner by the First Principal Ex. Comp. 
W. R. Kennedy and his officers. This was one of the 
largest Chapters in the District, and is in a very pros- 
perous condition. R. Ex. Comp. O. Ellwood, the 
Scribe E., is a most excellent and efficient officer. To 
his ability and energy much of the success and the good 
financial condition of this Chapter is credited. 

In making this report I have endeavored to put my 
remarks into as short a form as possible, realizing that 
the yearly report of Grand Chapter is growing to an 
enormous size, but I must thank the officers and mem- 
bers of the ten Chapters in London District for the 
many acts of kindness shown to me during my term of 
office. I was always received with courtesy, and my 



42 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

remarks on the work were always accepted in the 
fraternal spirit in which they were meant. I earnestly 
trust that my work among the Companions, during 
the past year, made a lasting impression for good, and 
for the good of Capitular Masonry. 

Fraternally submitted, 



John Nunn, 
Grand Supt., London District, No. 2. 



Strathroy, Ont. 



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44 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



WILSON DISTRICT, No. 3. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Com.-anions : 

It is somewhat reluctantly that I write this report 
on Wilson District, No. 3, as it virtually brings to a 
close what has proved to be a very enjoyable term of 
activity as Superintendent. In all my intercourse 
with the Chapters in the District, I have had the most 
cordial reception and my pathway has been so smoothed 
out that effort on my part became pleasure, and work 
a recreation, and I render thanks accordingly to all 
who have so whole-heartedly co-operated with me. 

Official visits were very much interfered with by the 
Influenza Epidemic which indeed interfered with many 
regular Convocations this year, every Chapter in the 
District having been compelled to close down for a 
greater or lesser period. After several false starts, 
however, each Chapter has been visited, and I am able 
to report that the institution, so far, at least, as the 
ancient usages and customs are concerned, is not 
suffering at the hands of Royal Arch Masons in Wilson 
District. It is a matter of regret, however, that every 
Chapter except one, reports poor attendance at Chapter 
Convocations. The reasons given were invariably 
"the War" and "the flu," quite valid in most cases, 
as both have had a most depressing effect on the 
members, moreover, overseas service has drained much 
of the young, virile blood temporarily from the life of 
the institution, which accounts for the fact that many 
Past Z's are filling the administrative chairs. Some 
Companions, however, were somewhat frank in stating 
that the Convocations had been allowed to get into a 
rut, in which routine and degree work became mono- 
tonous, and were not made interesting enough to 
warrant the effort of attendance. Knowing there was a 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 45 

large element of truth in this, I have endeavored to 
impress upon the Chapters the duty we owe the Order 
in practicing not only the morals, but the social virtues. 
It should not be difficult for the officers to devise some 
means of infusing new life and interest into the Con- 
vocations, where they have the ability of such men as 
it was my privilege to meet in the Chapter rooms, to 
depend upon, for either entertainment or instruction. 
Also we tried to show that the individual member 
has some responsibilities in the matter. If he wants 
to get something out of the Chapter he must be willing 
to put something in. 

Harris Chapter, No. 41, Ingersoll. — On October 
25th I visited this Chapter. As this is my home 
Chapter there was perhaps less formality than generally 
marks the Superintendent's visit, but we enjoyed a 
good heart to heart talk which I believe will be of mutual 
benefit. Owing to a variety of circumstances, two of 
the principal chairs are occupied by Past Z's, both of 
whom are enthusiastic, and we are anticipating good 
things from Harris Chapter. Several of the members 
are overseas, and a draped Charter is a silent reminder 
that one will not return. No degree work was under- 
taken, but I am able to say that the officers are well 
qualified by natural ability and earnest study to confer 
any of the degrees. 

Mt. Horeb Chapter, No. 20, Brantford. — On 
December 6th, I visited this Chapter. This was the 
first Chapter visited after the signing of the armistice, 
and that event, combined with the fact that the Chapter 
had resumed after a temporary shut-down, on account 
of the "flu," made the Convocation rather more lively, 
and enjoyable even than usual. Election of officers 
proceeded smoothly and the unanimity, with which 
they were chosen, speaks well for harmony this year. 
The Mark Master degree was conferred and the work 
showed the effect of long practice for Mt. Horeb has a 
habit of conferring many degrees. This Chapter is in 
very truth the big sister in Wilson District, as naturally 
she should be, and the officers are overlooking no detail 
that will promote the best interest of the Order. Their 



46 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

comfortable quarters are an immense help. After-the- 
war refreshments and a short literary and musical 
programme brought a most pleasant evening to a close. 

Ezra Chapter, No. 23, Simcoe. — After several 
false starts on account of the "epidemic" I finally got 
to Simcoe at their regular Convocation on December 
19th. Although I did not see the Chapter at degree 
work, still we went over several matters of interest, 
besides holding the annual election of officers. My 
observation, regarding this Chapter, would be (and the 
same may be said of all the others — Mt. Horeb ex- 
cepted) that they are in danger of getting into a rut 
and would suggest to this year's officers that they 
exercise their ingenuity in devising new means of 
making the Convocations attractive to the members. 
We missed very much the Scribe E., who had to be away 
in connection with his D.D.G.M. duties in Craft 
Masonry. After the Chapter closed we went into 
executive session in the banquet room. 

Brant Chapter, No. 115, Paris. — On December 
16th, I visited this Chapter. Brant Chapter always 
arranges for a full moon, but even at that we should not 
have tried the "auto," for the roads were awful. In 
spite of every thing, however, we were well repaid for 
our trip. It was a busy night — everyone worked, 
even the Superintendent. His job was the installation 
ceremony, and after that we had the Royal Arch degree. 
Very little criticism was necessary as to the work of 
the Chapter, but we discussed the necessity for making 
the Convocations socially and intellectually attractive. 
Refreshments were served, but previous to this our 
chauffeur had repaired the spring of the car that had 
been broken and the trip home was made in compara- 
tive comfort. 

Oxford Chapter, No. 18, Woodstock. — On Janu- 
ary 17th, I visited this Chapter, accompanied by some 
Ingersoll Companions. I made this my last official 
visit. It was the night of installation and the cere- 
mony was conducted by our well beloved R; Ex. Comp. 
Jos. Dutton. No candidates were on hand and con- 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 47 

sequently degree work was not attempted. However, 
among the newly installed officers are several of the 
"old guard," and the new material looks good, so that 
Oxford Chapter may be considered "safe" for Royal 
Arch Masonry. The complaint here, as elsewhere, 
was lack of attendance and I again delivered my little 
lecture on sociability and entertainment, and although 
the Woodstock Companions know me pretty well?, 
personally, I believe they were disposed to take my 
remarks seriously. At any rate, they promised thought- 
ful consideration. The Chapter possesses a banquet 
room which was brought into requisition. 

My report would be incomplete without reference 
to the visit of a "Grand Chapter Party" to Ezra 
Chapter, Simcoe, on September 26th, 1918, when the 
Royal Arch degree was conferred. Ezra Chapter were 
profuse in their invitations to meet the "Grand Chapter 
Party," and a thoroughly representative gathering of 
Companions from the District was the result. We 
went expecting to see the Royal Arch degree conferred 
in all its beauty, we came away with our expectations 
fully realized, with new conceptions of the aim and 
objects of our Order, and with an inspiration to renewed 
efforts on its behalf. Not only Ezra Chapter, but all 
other Chapters in the jurisdiction very warmly appre- 
ciate the personal sacrifice made by the members of 
the "Grand Chapter Party" in coming, some from long 
distances, to give a new impetus to our work in Wilson 
District. 



All of which is fraternally submitted, 

R. B. Hutt, 
Grand Supt. Wilson District, No. j. 

Ingersoll, Ont. 



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ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 49 



WELLINGTON DISTRICT, No. 4. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have the honor to submit, for your approval, my 
report on the condition of Capitular Masonry in Wel- 
lington District, No. 4, for the year 1918. 

Each Chapter in the District I have visited, and at 
each I have been royally welcomed. Banquets fol- 
lowed the work in the Chapter rooms where the local 
and visiting Companions had an opportunity of inter- 
mingling and fraternizing more freely than they pos- 
sibly could in Chapter rooms and every Companion 
appeared to enjoy himself. 

Waterloo Chapter, No. 32, Galt. — My first 
visit was to Waterloo Chapter, No. 32, Gait, on April 
15th, 1918. As this was the fiftieth anniversary of 
Gait Chapter, the work of the Royal Arch degree was 
conferred in a most excellent manner by Grand Chapter 
officers, M.- Ex. Comp. Geo. Moore, of Hamilton, acting 
as First Principal. An interesting feature, in con- 
nection with this Chapter, is the fact, that after a 
service of twenty years as Scribe E., Ex. Comp. Chas. 
Blake was elected as First Principal, as a mark of 
appreciation for his faithful work. 

I again made an official visit to this Chapter on 
May 13th, accompanied by R. Ex. Comp. W. G. 
Stephenson, and other Companions of Guelph Chapter, 
and we were received in a most cordial manner by the 
Gait Companion^. Two candidates received the Mark 
Master Mason degree, the work being conferred by 
Ex. Comp. Chas. Blake, as Worshipful Master, in a 
most efficient and creditable manner. 



50 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Kitchener Chapter, No. 117, Kitchener. — Ac- 
companied by Ex. Comp. J. F. Marr, and other Guelph 
Companions, I next visited Kitchener Chapter, on 
May 17th. We were well received by the Companions 
of Kitchener. The work of the Most Excellent Master 
degree was most excellently conferred by Second 
Principal, Ex. Comp. J. F. Carmichael. The work 
of the evening reflected great credit on the Kitchener 
Chapter officers. 

Ionic Chapter, No. 83, Orangeville. — On May 
28th, I visited Ionic Chapter, No. 83, Orangeville, 
accompanied by Ex. Comp. Everett of Wawanosh 
Chapter, No. 15, Sarnia, and other Companions from 
Antiquity Chapter, Toronto. Here the Most Excellent 
Master degree was conferred as W.M. by First Principal 
Sproule. I had also the pleasure of meeting R. Ex. 
Comp. Irving, a Veteran of Ionic Chapter, who is still 
as keen in Masonry as ever. Ex. Comp. McKeown, 
M.L.A., was also present. 

Enterprise Chapter, No. 67, Harriston. — This 
Chapter I visited on Civic Holiday, August 3rd. The 
work conferred was the Mark Master Mason degree. 
On account of this Chapter including within its 
jurisdiction a number of adjoining towns, the 
membership though large, is consequently scattered. 
The officers, too, owing to these same reasons, 
find it difficult to get together for practice and so 
the work is put on with greater difficulty, than 
in the larger centres, where these conditions do 
not exist. The Mark Master Mason degree, however, 
was splendidly conferred by First Principal Patterson, 
and his assistants. R. Ex. Comp. Prain, who is over 
ninety years of age, took a creditable part in the 
work. 

Guelph Chapter, No. 40, Guelph. — My last visit 
was to Guelph Chapter, No. 40 at the November meet- 
ing. The work of the evening was the Most Excellent 
Master degree by Ex. Comp. W. McPhail, assisted by 
the officers of the Chapter. This being my own Chapter, 
probably the least said, in praise or condemnation, the 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 51 

better. However, the work was well done and Guelph 
Chapter has bright prospects of becoming a very 
flourishing one. 

Chapter of Instruction. — A Chapter of In- 
struction was held in Guelph on June 12th, under the 
auspices of Guelph Chapter, No. 40, when the three 
degrees were splendidly exemplified by the following 
Chapters : 

Mark Master Mason degree by Ionic Chapter, No. 
83, Orangeville, with R. Ex. Comp. Preston, who had 
recently returned from the front, in the chair. 

Most Excellent Master degree by Kitchener Chapter, 
No. 117, with Ex. Comp. J. F. Carmichael in the chair 4 
and 

The Royal Arch degree by Waterloo Chapter, No. 
32, Gait, Ex. Comp. Blake being in the chair. 

After the exemplification of these degrees, R. Ex. 
Comp. H. T. Smith, Grand Scribe E., gave a most 
interesting address on "The Symbols of Royal Arch 
Masonry," which was very much enjoyed by all present. 
A banquet followed, and a good social time was spent 
with the Companions. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, 

Thos. C. Rundle, 
Grand Supt., Wellington District, No. 4. 

Guelph, Ont. 



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ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 53 



HAMILTON DISTRICT, No. 5. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have the honor to present for your consideration 
my report on the condition of the Royal Craft in 
Hamilton District, No. 5. 

During the year I have visited all the Chapters in 
the District officially and the Hamilton Chapters on 
more than one occasion. I have observed the confer- 
ring of degrees in The Hiram, No. 2, St. John's, No. 6, 
White Oak, No. 104, and The Hamilton, No. 175, 
and have pleasure in reporting, that a high standard 
of work has been attained, and that the future of these 
Chapters seems bright. 

My plans to visit St. Clair, No. 75, and Ancaster, 
No. 155, when they were conferring degrees were 
frustrated by the epidemic of influenza. In St. Clair 
Chapter, although the hand of death has removed 
five worthy Companions and only one candidate 
has been received, I found a hopeful spirit among the 
Companions, and I feel, that the incoming year will be 
a successful one. The progress of Ancaster Chapter 
seems secure, as thirty-three degrees were conferred 
during the year, with a number of desirable brethren 
as candidates in prospect. 

I had the pleasure of presiding at the annual elec- 
tions and found in all the Chapters a unanimity of 
feeling as evidenced by the votes cast, which is a proof 
of the love and harmony which prevails in the various 
Chapters, which shows, a confidence in the zeal and 
ability of those who will control the destinies of the 
Chapters and is an augury for success during the 
ensuing twelve months. 

The net gain in membership for the District is 
fifty-seven. The Books of Marks have been resus- 



54 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

citated where previously used and established when 
they had not existed in the past. 

The question of the restoration of the Sash as a 
portion of the Regalia has been discussed in all the 
Chapters, and I found the unanimous feeling of the 
District in favor of the restoration. 

It was my good fortune to be able to travel with 
St. John's Chapter, No. 6, in a fraternal visit to Grimsby 
Chapter, No. 69 when St. John's Chapter conferred the 
Royal Arch degree in an excellent manner, and a very 
pleasant after meeting was held, when we participated 
in a choice repast prepared for us by the good Com- 
panions of Grimsby Chapter. 

The most notable function of the year was a Con- 
vocation of The Hiram Chapter, No. 2, on November 
22nd, when the Royal Arch degree was conferred by 
past and present officers of the Grand Chapter. M. 
Ex. Comps. George Moore, A. Shaw, and W. G. Reid ; 
R. Ex. Comps. R. J. Gibson, H. S. Griffin, R. H. 
Spencer, J. H. Cowan, R. S. Hamilton, W. G. Price, 
R. C. Douglas, R. J. Reade, F. Hills, G. E. Parkes, 
W. S. Milne, H. T. Smith, F. A. Copus, W. M. Logan, 
W. Panton and W. H. Davis and a number of Very 
Excellent and Excellent Companions taking part in 
the ceremony. An address of welcome to the visitors 
was delivered by Ex. Comp. and Grand Master W. H. 
Wardrope, which was responded to by R. Ex. Comp. 
and Past Grand Master A. T. Freed. At the dinner, 
which followed the ceremony in the Chapter room, 
we had a number of interesting and instructive speeches, 
among which was a very able address on Red Cross 
work in Europe by R. Ex. Comp. K. J. Dunstan. This 
illustration of the work will be an inspiration to the 
Companions of the Hamilton District, and an incentive 
to secure a higher degree of excellence in the rendition 
of the degrees in the respective Chapters. 

I wish to thank the Right Excellent and Excellent 
Companions who assisted me on my official visits, 
notably V. Ex. Comp. A. G. Bain, District Secretary ; 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 55 

R. Ex. Comp. W. M.Logan; V. Ex. Comp. George H. 
Britton and Ex. Comps. D. W. Evans, H. R. Clark and 
S. S. Forbes. 

In conclusion I desire to convey my appreciation 
to the officers and Companions of the various Chapters 
for their hospitality to myself and the Companions 
who accompanied me on my official visits. The kind- 
ness and fraternal feeling shown me, on all occasions, 
was most gratifying and I look back on my term of 
office as one of the most enjoyable experiences of my 
life, and I trust that my efforts in the cause of Capitular 
Masonry may bear some good fruit in District No. 5. 

Fraternally submitted, 

W. H. Davis, 
Grand Supt., Hamilton District, No. 5. 

Hamilton, Ont. 



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ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 57 



HURON DISTRICT, No. 6. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers ayid Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have the honor to submit my report on the con- 
dition of Royal Arch Masonry in the Huron District, 
No. 6, for the year 1918. 

I take this opportunity of expressing my apprecia- 
tion of the honor conferred upon me, in electing me 
Grand Superintendent of this District. The duties of 
the office, while more or less exacting, have nevertheless 
been a great pleasure to me, and I shall always look 
back with happy remembrances on the enjoyable 
visits I had to the different Chapters, during the 
past year. 

I have visited every Chapter in the District, and 
wish to express my thanks to the officers and Com- 
panions of the various Chapters for the kindness with 
which they have received me. Harmony prevails 
throughout the District, and with one or two exceptions, 
they have made definite progress, both in membership 
and financial matters. In accordance with instructions 
received, I have, on my official visits, brought to the 
attention of the different Chapters, the important 
changes ia our new Constitution. 

Lebanon Chapter, No. 84, Wingham. — I paid my 
official visit to this Chapter, June 18th, accompanied 
by Ex. Comps. H. O. Bell, W. H. Johns and A. Huber 
of Southampton. This Chapter is certainly forging 
ahead, having lots of work and splendid prospects. 
The Royal Arch degree was conferred on seven candi- 
dates and the ballot passed for another. The Principals 
and officers are to be congratulated on the efficient 
manner in which they conferred this degree. Ex. 
Comp. Coutts being especially good ; his rendering of 



58 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

the Mystical Lecture being faultless. A pleasant 
feature of my visit being the meeting of several of our 
former citizens, one of our Past Principals Ex. Comps. 
E. J. Mitchell, E. Nash and one of the candidates, 
Bro. Frankum. A very enjoyable evening was brought 
to a close, with light refreshments, after which we 
motored home, arriving in Southampton at 3.30 p.m. 

Havelock Chapter, No. 63, Kincardine. — On 
October 18th, I visited this Chapter, accompanied by 
Comp. Speare, Ex. Comps. Martin and F. Thomson. 
The day of our Convocation, the churches, schools and 
other public places were ordered closed, because of the 
"Influenza Epidemic," so we had a rather poor at- 
tendance. Notwithstanding this handicap they conferred 
the Royal Arch degree on two candidates in a manner 
above criticism.- A pleasing feature of our visit to 
Kincardine, is the fact, that Kincardine is the mother 
Chapter of most of our Charter members. The work 
of the Chapter being concluded, we adjourned to their 
banqueting hall, where a pleasant hour was spent in 
speech and song. One of their oldest Companions, 
R. Ex. Comp. Miller, in particular pleasing us, with his 
songs and stories. 

Lucknow Chapter, No. 147, Lucknow. — Received 
a very hearty reception on my visit to this Chapter, 
November 20th. This Chapter has been in bad shape 
for a long time, and it is a great pleasure to me to be 
able to send in a much better report than my pre- 
decessors. Lucknow, notwithstanding many dis- 
advantages is putting up a "game" fight, and if the 
members can hold out a little longer I can see no reason 
why they should not have a good Chapter. Their 
Chapter room is badly situated and they are terribly 
handicapped by the loss of all their Past Principals. 
The Royal Arch degree was conferred on two candiates, 
Ex. Comp. Boyle in particular distinguishing himself 
by the very able manner in which he filled the First 
Principal's Chair. This Chapter should be all right as 
it has some very promising material for promotion. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 59 

After the labors of the evening, we adjourned to the 
banquet hall, where a pleasant evening was brought to 
a close. 

Bernard Chapter, No. 146, Listowel. — I visited 
Bernard Chapter on the evening of November 21st, 
and received a hearty welcome from the Companions, 
and although there were no candidates, we spent a very 
pleasant and profitable evening talking over the 
"Work." While the Companions of this Chapter are 
well skilled, still I think that our talk was of mutual 
advantage to myself and the Companions. This 
Chapter has a very pleasant home, where it ought to be 
a pleasure for them to meet and work together. A 
delightful evening was brought to a close in their 
banqueting hall. 

Tecumseh Chapter, No. 24, Stratford. — On 
November 22nd, I visited this Chapter and was warmly 
received by the Companions. Tecumseh Chapter is 
the largest in the District, and is in a very prosperous 
condition. Two candidates were exalted to the 
Supreme Degree of the Holy Royal Arch, in an almost 
perfect manner, and this Chapter is surely to be con- 
gratulated on its splendid array of Past and Present 
officers. Indeed, no one would expect to see anything 
else than almost faultless work here, for the Chapter 
has one of the most beautifully finished homes it has 
been my pleasure to visit. At the conclusion of the 
degree, we repaired to the banquet hall where a choice 
luncheon was enjoyed, followed by a short toast list, 
presided over by Ex. Comp. Abraham. 

St. James Chapter, No. 46, St. Marys. — I had 
the pleasure of visiting this Chapter on December 9th, 
and was warmly welcomed by the Companions. Be- 
cause of the "flu," I had a great deal of trouble setting 
a date for my visit, as a great many of the Companions 
were ill and this no doubt explained the lack of a 
candidate, though on the night of my visit they had 
seven applications. I was greatly impressed with the 
possibilities of this Chapter and believe that it has a 
very bright future ahead. Though prepared to confer a 



60 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

degree with a dummy, it was decided to spend the even- 
ing talking over the debatable portions of Royal Arch 
Masonry and the new Constitution. Thus was spent; 
a very profitable and pleasaat evening. 

Elliot Chapter, No. 129, Mitchell. — I visited 
this Chapter on December 10th, and was given a very 
cordial reception by the Companions. The Royal 
Arch degree was conferred in a very able manner by 
R. Ex. Comp. Elliot, to whose zeal and fidelity, this 
Chapter owes a great deal. The Chapter has a very 
large amount of outstanding dues and in my opinion 
will never be in a really flourishing condition until this 
has been remedied, as a member in arrears is a very 
lukewarm member at best. A pleasant evening was 
brought to a close by the exemplification of the "Fourth 
Degree." 

Chantry Chapter, No. 130, Southampton. — This* 
my home Chapter, I visited January 14th, 1919, and 
was given a very hearty reception and was made to 
feel that in being honored by Grand Chapter, they 
were also honored. Ex. Comp. J. Macaulay though 
past the allotted span, conferred the Mark Master 
Mason degree in a faultless manner. The new officers 
were installed and from the excellent material, Chantry 
Chapter should have no difficulty in measuring up to 
the requirements of Royal Arch Masonry. This 
Chapte" has been very "hard hit" by the war, but from 
present indications it is going to have a renewal of old 
time prosperity. The business of the evening being 
completed, we repaired to the banquet hall and spent 
a very enjoyable hour listening to speech, story and 
song. 

Malloch Chapter, No. 66, Seaforth.— After 
many attempts to visit this Chapter, I finally succeeded 
in visiting it on the evening of February 17th, and 
received a very hearty welcome. Seaforth has been 
"hard hit" by the influenza epidemic, and my visit to 
this Chapter had to be postponed several times because 
of it. The pleasure of my visit was spoiled to a large 
extent by the serious illness of their First -Principal,- 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 61 

Ex. Comp. L. T. DeLacy. In his absence, the Chair 
was filled in a very able manner by Ex. Comp. S. T. 
Holmes and with the assistance of several Past Prin- 
cipals, the Mark Master Mason degree was conferred 
on several candidates. 

Huron Chapter, No. 30, Goderich. — I visited this 
Chapter , February 18th, and received a very hearty 
welcome. This was to have been Installation Night, 
but owing to the unavoidable absence of some of the 
officers it had to be postponed, and as there were no 
candidates, the evening was spent in reviewing the work 
and discussing the new Constitution. After the closing 
of the Chapter, we repaired to a nearby restaurant 
where a very enjoyable hour was spent. Huron Chapter 
has one of the best homes in the District and with some 
contemplated decorations will easily rank first. 

Now that the war is over and as soon as the terrible 
Influenza Epidemic is past, I believe that the Chapters 
of the District will flourish as never before. Indeed in 
spite of the war and this terrible plague, most of the 
Chapters have shown a healthy growth. 



Fraternally submitted, 

R. B. HlLLMER, 

Grand Supt., Huron District, No. 6. 
Southampton, Ont. 



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ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 63 



NIAGARA DISTRICT, No. 7. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companion : 

I have the honor to submit my report on the con- 
dition of Royal Arch Masonry in the Niagara District 
for the year 1918. 

In the District I have visited every Chapter officially 
during my term of office, and I wish to express my 
thanks to the officers and Companions of each .Chapter 
for the courteous receptions, and kindness extended to 
me as your representative. 

The "Spanish Influenza" epidemic interfered with 
my work to a great extent. Many of the Chapters 
were unable to hold their Convocations on account of 
the "ban" being placed on meetings. It is, therefore, 
gratifying to note, that although adverse conditions 
existed, the membership increased, financial conditions 
improved, and harmony prevails throughout the 
District. 

During the year, thanks to the courtesy of M. Ex. 
Comp. Geo. Moore, of Hamilton, I was permitted to 
assist in conferring the Royal Arch degree at compli- 
mentary visits of Present and Past Grand Chapter 
officers to Ezra Chapter, Simcoe, and The Hiram 
Chapter, Hamilton. These Convocations were in my 
opinion of more benefit to Capitular Masonry than a 
Chapter of Instruction, and I would suggest that these 
visits be carried on in future, and extended to Chapters 
in other Districts. 

Mount Moriah Chapter, No. 19, St. Catharines. 
— I paid my official visit to this Chapter, December 
13th, I was introduced by R. Ex. Comps. Burch and 



64 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Gourlay. The Mark Master degree was conferred 
by the officers of this Chapter in an efficient manner. 
The work of R. Ex. Comp. Lindsay, who assisted, was 
worthy of praise. After the degree work was com- 
pleted, I had the honor of presenting to Ex. Comp. 
J. H. Herod, a Past Z's jewel. Ex. Comp. Herod 
having done work of merit while holding the various 
offices in the Chapter. The business of the evening 
was over, all repaired to the banquet table, where Ex. 
Comp. Smith, gave an instructive address on Masonry. 
This Chapter is to be congratulated on the high type 
of officers which they have elected to the various offices, 
and with the assistance they receive from the Right 
Excellent and Excellent Companions of the Chapter. 
I feel confident that Mount Moriah Chapter is bound to 
make progress and be a credit to Capitular Masonry. 

McCallum Chapter, No. 29, Dunnville. — I paid 
my official visit to this Chapter on December 20th, 
accompanied by Ex. Comp. Fralick, Comps. Somerville 
and Ort of Willson Chapter, and received a hearty 
welcome from R. Ex. Comp. Parkes and V. Ex. Comp. 
Yocom. The business of the evening was the election 
of officers which was carried on in an interesting manner. 
Ex. Comp. Cowles, being in the service of his king and 
country, was elected First Principal. McCallum Chap- 
ter has excellent quarters, and I was pleased to note 
that R. Ex. Comp. Parkes and several Ex. Comps. 
still take a deep interest in this Chapter. V. Ex. Comp. 
Yocom, Scribe E., keeps the records of this Chapter 
in an efficient manner. It is worthy of note that this 
Chapter has no dues outstanding. A pleasant hour 
was spent at the Dunnville Club, where a very fine 
banquet had been prepared. Ex. Comp. Appleyard 
and Comp. Fry, entertaining the party with songs. 

Niagara Chapter, No. 55, Niagara-on-the-Lake. 
— I paid my official visit to this Chapter on March 21st, 
1918, accompanied by forty-three Companions from 
Willson Chapter. It being previously arranged that 
Willson Chapter officers were to confer the Most 
Excellent Master degree. We were given a very 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 65 

courteous reception by R. Ex. Comp. McClelland and 
Companions of Niagara Chapter. 

After the Most Excellent Master degree had been 
conferred, the officers of Niagara Chapter, with R. Ex. 
Comps. McClelland as First Principal, conferred the 
Royal Arch degree on nine candidates, five of whom were 
Captains in the Canadian Expeditionary forces. The 
work of R. Ex. Comp. McClelland could not be 
be excelled. This R. Ex. Companion has a wonderful 
memory and a splendid delivery. We were later 
entertained to a banquet and left for Welland by special 
coach, everyone having had a pleasant night. This 
Chapter wiped out their liabilities during the year and 
increased their membership by ten which is the best 
advancement made in years. 

King Hiram Chapter, No. 57, Port Colborne. — 
I made my official visit to this Chapter on March 6th, 
accompanied by R. Ex. Comp. Ross and Ex. Comp. H. E. 
Boyle. I had the honor of installing the officers for the 
ensuing year. This Chapter was greatly handicapped, 
during the year, owing to the ' ' Spanish Flu, ' ' but the pros- 
pects are very b r ight. Ex. Comp. Johnson, was installed 
as First Principal, and owing to his previous experience, 
and talents which he possesses, with the assistance of 
Ex. Comps. McCracken and Smith, the coming year 
should be a decided success. I examined the books 
and records and find that R. Ex. Comp. Winn, the 
Scribe E., has done excellent work. After the regular 
business had been transacted the Convocation closed 
in harmony, and we then spent a very pleasant hour at 
a banquet. R. Ex. Comp. Ross gave us all some timely 
advice in a neat address. 

Willson Chapter, No. 64, Welland. — I visited 
officially this, my Mother Chapter, on December 4th, 
when the Mark Master Mason degree was conferred 
on four candidates in an efficient manner. The Com- 
panions of this Chapter are very proud of their Scribe 
E. who keeps his books very neat and who sends out a 
notice of our Convocations which is a work of art. 
I have attended all but one Convocation of this Chapter, 



66 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

during the year. R. Ex. Comp. Ross, or as we all call 
him "Daddy" Ross, was First Principal, and he is 
always prepared to do any part of the work. I am 
deeply grateful to him and Ex. Comp. Boyle, for their 
kind assistance which they have given me in the per- 
formance of my duties. The Principals are to be 
congratulated in taking the stand they have during 
the year in reducing the outstanding dues of the Chapter 
from $250 to $12. 

Grimsby Chapter, No. 69, Grimsby. — I paid my 
official visit to this Chapter on December 2nd, and 
received a very courteous reception from Ex. Comps. 
Wray, Farrell and Marlatt, and the Companions of 
the Chapter. The Royal Arch degree was exemplified 
by the officers of the Chapter in a very impressive 
manner. Ex. Comp. Marlatt, and those assisting him, 
are worthy of commendation for the successful manner 
in which the affairs of the Chapter are being carried on. 
I find the books and records neatly kept by Comp 
A. H. Phipps, Scribe E. After the work of the evening 
had been completed we repaired to the banquet hall, 
where short addresses were given by Ex. Comp. Wray 
and Comp. McConachie. 

. Mount Nebo Chapter, No. 76, Niagara Falls. — I 
paid my official visit to this Chapter on June 21st, 
accompanied by R. Ex. Comp. Ross. I was tendered a 
very cordial reception by R. Ex. Comps. Swannell and 
McCredie. The Royal Arch degree was conferred on 
several candidates in an impressive manner. The 
work of the Principal Sojourner, Comp. Stringer, being 
excellent. The books of the Chapter are in the excellent 
hands of R. Ex. Comp. F. W. Swannell. At one of my 
unofficial visits to this Chapter, I had the pleasure of 
listening to the best auditor's report ever given. This 
is one of the best Chapters in Niagara District. 

Hugh Murray Chapter, No. 184, Bridgeburg. — I 
paid my official visit to this Chapter on December 10th, 
and received a very cordial reception from Ex. Comps. 
Jukes and Wilbee. There were no candidates for 
exaltation. The evening was devoted to election of 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 67 

officers and organizing for the coming year. This 
Chapter has a small membership, but it is fortunate in 
having Ex. Companions who take an earnest interest 
in its welfare. The prospects are bright for the coming 
year. The books and records are kept neat and 
properly by Comp. North, Scribe E. After the Chapter 
closed refreshments were served, and Ex. Comps. 
Wilbee and Jukes entertained the Companions. 

I am grateful for the honor of having been per- 
mitted to preside over the Niagara District for the past 
year, and trust my efforts have met with the approval 
of my Companions, and have not been wholly without 
beneficial results. Personally, it has been a labor 
of love. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Ross C. Douglas, 
Grand Supt., Niagara District, No. 7. 

Welland, Ont. 



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ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 69 



TORONTO DISTRICT No. 8. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Members 
of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of 
Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I herewith present the report of my impressions on 
Royal Arch Masonry in this District, during my term of 
office. I do so with the earnest hope that if this report 
appears to you to contain any suggestions which are for 
the good of Capitular Masonry, that the suggestions 
will receive your earnest consideration. I am not 
compiling this report as a matter of form, but I am 
giving it my earnest consideration as an expression of 
my appreciatioa of the honor that has been conferred 
upon me by you in appointing me to the important 
office of Grand Superintendent of this important 
District. 

My first official act was to appoint a District 
Secretary whom I knew would take the duties of the 
office seriously, and I therefore selected Comp. Sydney 
H. Jones of St. Paul's Chapter, No. 65, to act. Comp. 
Jones was good enough to accept the onerous duties, 
and has entirely justified his appointment by his pains- 
taking work and courteous bearing. 

During my term of office I have visited every 
Chapter, at least once, and some several times. I have 
not refused any invitations to attend a Chapter. 

R. Ex. Comp. Gardiner deserves special mention 
because of his kindness and courtesy in accompanying 
me on as many occasions as he possibly could. R.Ex. 
Comps. Henry T. Smith and R. J. Gibson were also 
good enough to take a great interest in my work. 

I received a most cordial reception from the Com- 
panions of each Chapter, who exhibited towards me a 
truly Masonic friendship. In this Dist'ict I found 
much dissatisfaction with the action of Grand Chapter 



70 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

in discarding the Sash as part of the regalia of Royal 
Arch Masons. It was felt that so important a change 
should not have been effected without giving a notice 
of motion, so that Grand Chapter would be able to 
leara the desires of the constituent Chapters of Grand 
Chapter. The Chapters of the Districts have sent me 
copies of notices of motion passed by their Chapters, 
expressing the opinion that the Sash should be restored 
as part of the Royal Arch Regalia. 

In my report to Grand Chapter on my impressions, 
during my term of activities, as Grand Superintendent, 
I would like to dwell especially on two subjects. First, 
upon the inconsistencies and contradictions in the 
Ritual as sanctioned by Grand Chapter. I especially 
wish to point out that my criticism does not relate to 
the Ritual as such, but to the instructions laid down 
for the technique of the floor work in presenting the 
Ritual. Second, the lack of continuity in the efforts 
of the Grand Superintendents and the remedy for the 
same. 

First, then, in regard to the instructions for present- 
ing the different degrees of Mark Master Mason, Most 
Excellent Master and Royal Arch. As you are no 
doubt aware, the Ritual has not been reprinted for 
about twelve years. The instructions abound in 
glaring inconsistencies. I have made fairly exhaustive 
notes on this aspect of the work, and have made a 
revision which I have placed in the hands of the R. Ex. 
Comp. Henry T. Smith, Grand Scribe E. I would 
suggest, with these notes as a basis, that a committee 
be appointed to revise the instructions for the floor 
work, and report at the 1920 Annual Meeting of Grand 
Chapter what they think of the advisability of a reprint 
with a view to systematizing the instructions. This 
I believe will give the Companions, more admiration 
for the function and work of the Grand Chapter, and 
add to the uniformity of work among the various 
Chapters. 

In this connection I perhaps ought to bring to your 
attention the lamentable fact that the Companions as 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 71 

a whole are not disposed to take the degrees of Mark 
Master Mason and Most Excellent Master as seriously 
as the degree of the Royal Arch. I have endeavored 
to find reasons for this. The first is, that the Con- 
stitution permits the conferring of the two degrees on a 
candidate at the same Convocation. If the ruling of 
Grand Chapter required a month to elapse between the 
conferring of the degrees of Mark Master Mason and 
Most Excellent Master there would be more solemnity 
in the work ; there would be greater interest taken in 
preparing the degree work ; and the candidates would 
feel that the Chapter itself held the degrees in high 
regard. 

If in addition to this ruling more comprehensive 
instructions were given in regard to the floor work the 
degrees could be put on in a more elaborate form and 
embellished to accentuate the spirit of the work, 
without interfering with the present Ritual as it stands. 

Pertaining to the continuity of the efforts of the 
Grand Superintendents, my experience leads me to the 
belief, that the Grand Superintendent should have some 
opportunity for gaining a knowledge of his work before 
entering upon his duties. As it is at present the Grand 
Superintendents have no certainty that they will have 
to attend to the duties of Grand Superintendent until 
they are elected. As a rule they are elected in 
February, and at that time the Chapters have been 
working two months. The Grand Superintendent 
then has to become acquainted with his Principals, 
and prepare for Chapters of Instruction. Owing to the 
newness of his surroundings much valuable time is lost, 
and it is well on in the working year of the Chapters 
before Chapters of Instructions can be prepared. 
Then again he is more or less unacquainted with his 
duties, and the etiquette of his office. The particular 
inconsistencies which the former Superintendents have 
endeavored to correct are likely to be overlooked in 
favor of some other feature that presents itself more 
particularly to him. Thus there is not that continuity 
of effort that must be continued from year to year 
to gain the results which should benefit Royal Arch 
Masonry. 



72 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

This is the statement of the deficiency which exists 
in the present system of selecting Grand Superin- 
tendents. Is there an alternative method that would 
overcome these drawbacks ? With your permission, 
I would present for your consideration the following 
alternative. But first, let me point out the situation 
of the Most Excellent, the Grand First Principal, in 
respect to his preparation for the work of his office. 
When Grand Chapter meets the important election 
is that of Grand Third Principal. The Companion 
occupies this position for two years and then by common 
consent is elected consecutively to the offices of Grand 
Second Principal and Grand First Principal. So the 
Grand First Principal has had four years of office, and 
training, preparing him for his duties. 

Again may I emphasize the condition that exists in 
the constituent Chapters where the First Principal 
has had his training in the previous offices, enabling 
him to become acquainted with his duties, and with the 
officers associated with him. 

These remarks will undoubtedly suggest to you the 
remedy I have in mind for the training of the Grand 
Superintendents. That is, the creation of the office 
of Deputy Grand Superintendent whose duty it will be 
to accompany the Grand Superintendent on his visits. 
The election of the District would then be for the 
Deputy Grand Superintendent, as in the case of the 
Grand Third Principal, who by common consent in 
the following year would be automatically elected to 
the office of Grand Superintendent. The advantages 
accruing from this procedure would be that the Deputy 
Grand Superintendent would know a year in advance 
that he would be called on to assume the office of 
Grand Superintendent. He would be in constant touch 
with the Grand Superintendent and his duties. He 
would learn the etiquette of the office and be able to 
assume his duties easily. In consultation with the Grand 
Superintendent he would learn the weaknesses of the 
different Chapters as seen by the Grand Superintendent, 
and when his own time came to watch over the interests 
of the District he could carry on the work of his pre- 
decessor and further enlarge on the methods of improve- 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 73 

merit. Furthermore, he would become acquainted 
with the officers of the various Chapters and could give 
his special attention to the Second Principals who 
would rule the Chapters during his term as Grand 
Superintendent. It would be his duty to see that the 
Second Principals became well acquainted with each 
other, and he could induce them to make arrangements 
among themselves for visits during their term as pre- 
siding officers. He could also inform them as to which 
Chapters would be requested to put on the several 
degrees at the Chapters of Instruction. Thus when 
elected as Grand Superintendent he would be able at 
once to instruct the Chapters of his District in the 
method of working the degrees. 

These are some of the chief advantages which 
would accrue from the change I suggest, and I present 
them to you as the result of my experience as Grand 
Superintendent. 

Peel Chapter, No. 195, Brampton. — On May 7th, 
I motored to Brampton, accompanied by my Secretary 
and R.Ex. Comps. H. T. Smith and R. J. Gibson. The 
attendance was small. The reception to the repre- 
sentative of Grand Chapter hearty. The work put 
on by the Chapter officers was the Most Excellent 
Master degree. Although the floor work of this degree 
is difficult, yet it was fairly done. But what was most 
propitious for the outlook of the Chapter was the 
sincere way in which the degree was worked. 

Orient Chapter, No. 79, Toronto. — This Chapter 
was visited on May 9th. The work conferred for 
Inspection by the officers was the Mark Master Mason 
degree. The number of Companions present was 
satisfactory. The work was well done. The Com- 
panions were, very friendly and their social meeting 
after Chapter closed was very enjoyable. 

St. Andrew and St. John Chapter, No., 4, 
Toronto. — This Chapter was visited on May 17th. 
There was a large turn out of Companions. The work 



74 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Inspected was the Royal Arch degree. It was very 
well done. This reliable Chapter still enjoys the 
brightest prospects. 

The Beaches Chapter, No. 163, Toronto. — This 
Chapter was visited on June 3rd. It is noted for its 
hospitality. The work presented was that of the 
Royal Arch degree. The reputation of the Chapter 
is sufficient to know that the work would be well done. 
This Chapter particularly makes a point of conforming 
to the rulings of Grand Chapter. I also noted that 
they did not give the Mark Master Mason degree and 
the Most Excellent Master degree to the one Candidate 
on the same night. The Chapter is strong. 

King Solomon Chapter, No. 8, Toronto. — On 
May 23rd, this Chapter put on the Royal Arch degree 
as a Chapter of Instruction. This was also their In- 
spection Night. As remarked under the heading of the 
Chapters of Instruction the work was very well done. 
The attendance was large, and a keen interest taken in 
the presentation. A cordial reception was given the 
Grand Superintendent. The prospects of the Chapter 
are all that could be desired. 

Victoria Chapter, No. 205, Thornhill. — This 
Chapter presented their work for Inspection on June 
12th. The degree worked was the Mark Master 
Mason. There was considerable waiting before the 
Chapter opened. The attendance was quite small. 
However, there are indications that the prospects of 
the Chapter are bright. 

Toronto Chapter, No. 185, Toronto. — On June 
17th, the Royal Arch degree was conferred for Inspec- 
tion by this Chapter. The work was satisfactory and 
well done. The prospects of this Chapter are good. 

Shekinah Chapter, No. 138, Toronto. — The 
Royal Arch degree was conferred by this Chapter for 
Inspection on September 10th. R.Ex. Comps. H. T. 
Smith and R. J. Gibson accompanied me on this 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 75 

occasion. The Chapter room is very pleasing. This 
Chapter is in a very healthy condition and its prospects 
are very good. 

The St. Patrick Chapter, No. 145, Toronto. — 
This Chapter was inspected on September 21st. The 
Mark Master Mason degree was worked in a satisfac- 
tory manner. This Chapter has a large attendance, 
and specializes on the "Fourth Degree." The St. 
Patrick's Chapter is in a very prosperous condition. 

York Chapter, No. 62, Toronto. — On October 
4th, York Chapter conferred the Mark Master Mason 
degree for Inspection. The work was done in a satis- 
factory manner. The reception was cordial. The 
attendance was large. The condition of the Chapter 
is good. 

Occident Chapter, No. 77, Toronto. — October 
the 11th, was the time chosen for the Inspection of this 
Chapter. The work presented was the Royal Arch 
degree. This Chapter is enjoying great prosperity 
and its prospects are very good. A cordial reception 
was tendered me. 

Mount Sinai Chapter, No. U.D., Toronto. — 
This Chapter was visited on November 5th. The 
Royal Arch degree was conferred in a very creditable 
manner. This is the youngest Chapter and fills its 
place in the needs of this District. The reception 
tendered to the Grand Superintendent as a Represen- 
tative of Grand Chapter was very cordial. The 
prospects of the Chapter are very promising. 

St. Paul's Chapter, No. 65, Toronto. — On 
November 9th, the officers of St. Paul's Chapter put 
on the Royal Arch degree for Inspection. This was 
done in a satisfactory manner. The attendance was 
good. The reception accorded to your Representative 
was very gracious. The Chapter will have success. 
The Treasurer's books, under the care of V. Ex. Comp. 
S. B. Sykes, are particularly worthy of mention. 

Antiquity Chapter, No. 91, Toronto. — The 
officers of this Chapter, on November 27th, presented 



76 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

the Mark Master Mason degree for my Inspection. 
This was very well done. The reception was very 
cordial. The attendance was large, and the Chapter 
has a bright future. 

Doric Chapter, No. 60, Newmarket. — A large 
number of Toronto Companions went by special car 
to Newmarket on December 4th. This was for the 
Inspection of the Chapter. The Royal Arch degree 
was presented. The work was not well done. The 
prospects of the Chapter are not good. Special enquiry 
into the conditions should be made. For example, 
this same night was election night, and the newly 
exalted Candidate of the evening was elected to the 
office of Third Principal. The Companions of Doric 
Chapter very kindly received the visitors. The 
individual Companions of the Chapter are good Royal 
Arch Masons, but they are handicapped by the situation 
of the Chapter. 

Succoth Chapter, No. 135, Uxbridge. — On 
September 20th, a visit of Inspection was made to 
Uxbridge. The work presented was the Royal Arch 
degree. A particular feature of this visit was to note the 
visitors from outside Chapters. We had a most cordial 
reception. The Chapter has the usual difficulties of 
Rural Chapters. The Chapter is in good condition 
and the 'prospects are bright. The work of the P.S., 
Comp. J. F. Curl, is to be especially noted. 

Chapters of Instruction. — The Mark Master 
Mason degree was exemplified by St. Andrew's and 
St. John's ; and the Most Excellent Master degree 
by the Beaches on June the 21st, at the Masonic Hall, 
corner of Yonge and Davenport Road. The attend- 
ance was good and the work well done. The Royal 
Arch degree was worked by the King Solomon's Chapter 
on May 23rd, in a very satisfactory manner, and was 
much appreciated by the large attendance. 

Fraternally submitted, 

R. J. Reade, 
Grand Supt., Toronto District, No. 8. 
Toronto, Ont. 



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78 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



GEORGIAN DISTRICT, No. 9. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have the honor to present my report on the 
Condition of Capitular Masonry in Georgian District, 
No. 9. 

I visited only five of the eight Chapters in the 
District. Owing to the epidemic of Influenza in Mid- 
land and Wiarton, it was impossible for me to visit 
them all and the night I was to have paid my official 
visit to Signet Chapter, Barrie, I was under the doctor's 
care with the same malady. 

What work I witnessed was really most creditable 
in every Chapter, and I assure you, that Royal Arch 
Masonry in Georgian District is beyond doubt of a 
very high standard. 

Signet Chapter, No. 34, Barrie. — The night on 
which I was to have visited this Chapter, I was under 
the doctor's care as already intimated and was unable 
to attend. I have been given to understand that 
Signet Chapter has been the banner Chapter of the 
District and was very much disappointed in not being 
able to be present. However, I had R. Ex. Comp. 
Monckman act for me, and he has written me, that 
since he was Grand Superintendent of the District, 
Signet Chapter has improved in every way and the 
prospects for the future looked very promising. 

Couchiching Chapter, Orillia. — I had the ex- 
treme pleasure of visiting this Chapter on December 
18th, and was met at the depot by R. Ex. Comp. 
Tudhope. In the evening the Royal Arch degree was 
conferred by Ex. Comp. Wainwright and his officers. 
Under the supervision of R. Ex. Comp. Tudhope one 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 79 

could not but expect to see the beautiful manner in 
which this degree was conferred and it certainly was a 
pleasure to me. Royal Arch Masonry in Couchiching 
Chapter is certainly of a very high standard. A 
pleasant hour was spent in the refreshment room after 
the closing of the Chapter. Truly the prospects of 
this Chapter are bright. 

Grand River Chapter, No. 70, Bracebridge. — I 
visited this Chapter on December 17th, and although 
there were no degrees conferred, I feel quite sure from 
the way the Chapter was opened and the business done 
during the evening, that if a candidate had been in 
waiting he would have received his degree in a very 
creditable manner. Numerically and financially Grand 
River Chapter is of good standing. 

Amable Chapter, No. 131, Wiarton. — As I have 
had no report as to the meetings held since June, owing, 
as I have since learned, to the outbreak of Influenza, 
I was unable to visit this Chapter on the night which 
they had arranged for me in February, 1919, so I asked 
R. Ex. Comp. Foster, Past Grand Superintendent, to 
act for me and send me a report of same. He informs 
me they are still growing although like a good many 
others, not so fast since the outbreak of the War. 
However, he assures me that Amable Chapter is in a 
good healthy condition financially and otherwise. 

Georgian Chapter, No. 56, Owen Sound. — I had 
the pleasure of visiting this Chapter on December 10th, 
and saw the Royal Arch degree conferred by Ex. Comp. 
Patterson and his officers in a manner which I have 
never seen excelled. The number of Past Principals 
present was a great pleasure to see and shows that the 
interest is not all with the younger Companions. I 
was pleased to see so many members present and, 
after the work was completed, a very pleasant hour 
was spent in social intercourse in the refreshment room. 
The future progress of Georgian Chapter look very 
bright and promising. 



80 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

McPherson Chapter, No. 86, Meaford. — This 
being my own Chapter, I paid my official visit on 
June 20th, and was very much surprised to see the 
splendid manner in which Ex. Comp. Bright and his 
officers (assisted by R. Ex. Comps. Berry and Sparling) 
conferred the Royal Arch degree. They had been 
holding rehearsals without my knowledge and it was a 
very pleasant surprise to me. The prospects for the 
future of McPherson Chapter look bright indeed. 

Manitou Chapter, No. 27, Collingwood. — I 
visited this Chapter on November 29th, and received 
a most cordial reception from Ex. Comp. Robertson 
and his officers. They conferred the Mark Master 
Mason degree on five candidates in a manner which 
showed that Royal Arch Masonry is at a very high 
standard in Manitou Chapter. The way in which 
Comp. Capt. G. C. Coles, Scribe E., has his books is 
certainly gratifying. A very large attendance of Past 
Principals was pleasing for me to see, showing the 
interest taken in the work. After the work was com- 
pleted, a very pleasant hour was spent in the refresh- 
ment room. Manitou Chapter is certainly in the 
ascendancy. 

Kichekawana Chapter, No. 167, Midland. — This 
Chapter had the misfortune to lose their First Principal 
in September, having been moved to Pembroke. Owing 
to the Influenza, they were unable to replace him until 
December and I was ' unable to visit Kichekawana 
Chapter. However, I have received a very encouraging 
letter from Comp. R. D. Keefe, Scribe E., wherein he 
speaks very highly of the prospects of the Chapter 
which is held alternately in Midland and Pene- 
tanguishene, and from knowing the Companions who 
are members of this Chapter I am convinced that the 
Chapter is in a prosperous condition. 

In conclusion, I wish to thank the Companions of 
the District for the honor they conferred on me and I 
hope my efforts to fill the office have not been in vain. 

I wish also to thank the Companions of the different 
Chapters for the very kind manner in which they re- 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 81 

ceived me and, especially, to thank all the Scribes E. 
for their kindness and courtesy in answering any and 
all my communications. 

Let me add that the past year has been one of the 
most interesting of my Masonic career and I again 
express my appreciation of the privilege accorded me of 
representing the Most Excellent the Grand Z. in this 
District. 

Fraternally yOurs, 



Geo. H. Hair, 
Grand Supt. Georgian District, No. g. 

Meaford, Ont. 



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ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 83 



ONTARIO DISTRICT, No. 10. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have the honor to submit my report on the con- 
dition of Roval Arch Masonry in Ontario District, No. 
10, for the year 1918. 

Every Chapter in the District I visited with the 
exception of Corinthian Chapter, No. 36, Peterborough. 
I had made all arrangements to visit this Chapter, but 
owing to illness at home I asked R. Ex. Comp. R. S. 
Cotton to perform that duty for me, and he very kindly 
consented to do so. 

Ionic Chapter, No. 168, Campbellford. — I made 
my official visit to this Chapter on March 19th. The 
Mark Master Mason degree was conferred by the Ex. 
First Principal, and his efficient officers in a highly 
creditable manner. I again visited this Chapter by 
special invitation on March 17th of this year, when the 
Royal Arch degree, with full musical ritual, was con- 
ferred in the usual splendid manner in which this 
Chapter does its work. A delightful banquet brought 
a most enjoyable evening to an end. I was accom- 
panied on both these occasions by Ex. Comp. Frank 
G. Erskine. 

St. Andrew's Chapter, No. 139, Havelock. — I 
made my official visit to this Chapter on May 27th. 
The Mark Master Mason degree was conferred in a 
very satisfactory manner. R. Ex. Comp. R. S. Cotton 
has taken an interest in this Chapter and it is now in 
good condition. I was accompanied on this occasion 
by Ex. Comp. Frank G. Erskine.. 

Pentalpha Chapter, No. 28, Oshawa.— Accom- 
panied by several Companions of Keystone Chapter, 



84 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

No. 35, I visited this Chapter on October 1st. The 
Mark Master Mason degree was conferred in a most 
satisfactory manner by the regular officers. In new 
members this Chapter is very prosperous. A very 
pleasant evening was spent. 

St. John Chapter, No. 48, Cobourg. — I visited 
this Chapter on October 4th accompanied by several 
members of Keystone Chapter. The Royal Arch 
degree was conferred in a most efficient manner by the 
officers, and a very pleasant hour was afterward spent 
in the banquet hall. 

Victoria Chapter, No. 37, Port Hope. — Accom- 
panied by members of Keystone Chapter, I made my 
official visit to this Chapter on October 11th. The 
Royal Arch degree was conferred in their usual efficient 
manner, and a very pleasant social evening was enjoyed 
by all present. 

Warkworth Chapter, No. 110, Warkworth. — I 
visited this Chapter on October 18th. There being no 
work a very profitable evening was spent explaining 
the work of the different degrees. A large number of 
the members of Ionic Chapter, and also Ex. Comp. 
Frank G. Erskine accompanied me on this occasion. 

Presqu'Isle Chapter, No. 144, Brighton. — I made 
my official visit to this Chapter on October 22nd. 
The Mark Master Mason degree was conferred in a 
satisfactory manner by the regular officers, after which 
a pleasant social hour was enjoyed by all present. 
Several members of Ionic Chapter and also Ex. Comp. 
Frank G. Erskine accompanied me on this visit. 

Excelsior Chapter, No. 45, Colborne. — Accom- 
panied by members of Ionic Chapter, I visited this 
Chapter on December 17th. The Royal Arch degree 
was conferred splendidly by the Ex. Z., and his officers, 
and afterwards a very pleasant evening was enjoyed 
by all present. 

Midland Chapter, No. 94, Lindsay. — I visited 
this Chapter officially on October 13th. The various 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 85 

officers worked the Most Excellent Master degree in a 
very satisfactory manner, and a very pleasant evening 
was spent. 

Keystone Chapter, No. 35, Whitby. — This being 
my Mother Chapter I attended it on every Convocation 
night during the year, but made my official visit on 
December 20th. The Royal Arch degree was conferred in 
a highly satisfactory manner. The Companions took me 
by surprise, when presenting me with a handsome illum- 
inated address and a Past Z's jewel ; a presentation 
which I can assure you was much appreciated, after 
which a very pleasant evening was spent in the banquet 
hall. 

Corinthian Chapter, No. 36, Peterborough. — R. 
Ex. Comp. Cotton reports as follows : "I made an 
official visit to this Chapter on January 24th. The 
work of the evening being the Most Excellent Master 
degree, which was conferred in a most pleasing way 
by Ex. Comp. J. D. Cameron, the Second Principal. 
This Chapter which lost all its regalia in a fire last 
January, is now completely equipped with beautiful 
new regalia and hope to move into their new Masonic 
Home on January 31st. After the business of the 
evening a banquet was held, and Ex. Comp. G. W. 
Haley, First Principal, who is leaving for England, was 
presented with a Past First Principal's jewel and an 
address in token of the esteem in which he is held by the 
members of Corinthian Chapter. 

King Darius Chapter, No. 134, Cannington. — I 
made my official visit to this Chapter on February 26th, 
accompanied by Ex. Comp. F. W. Jones. The Mark 
Master Mason degree was conferred in a satisfactory 
manner, and after a short talk on Capitular Masonry, 
a pleasant hour was spent in the banquet hall. 

In closing, I wish to thank the Companions of this 
District for their loyal support and hearty co-operation 
throughout the year. Harmony and goodwill prevail 



86 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

in this district, and it has been the most pleasant and 
enjoyable year in my whole Masonic career. 

I am deeply gratified to the various Chapters for 
the many kindnesses extended to me on my visits, and 
I hope in the near future to renew acquaintances with 
them. 

Fraternally yours, 

Wm. Van Valkenburgh, 
Grand Supt. Ontario District, No. 10. 

Whitby, Ont. 



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88 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT, No. 11. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have the honour of submitting for your considera- 
tion my report on the condition of Capitular Masonry 
in Prince Edward District, No. 11. 

Keystone Chapter, No. 72, Stirling. I visited 
this Chapter on June 20th, and saw the Mark Master 
Mason degree conferred. Reference, I believe, should 
again be made to the manner in which R. Ex. Comp. 
Potts keeps the books of this Chapter. This is the 
only Chapter in the District which has a complete 
Book of Marks. 

Prince Edward Chapter, No. 31, Picton. — This 
Chapter was visited by me on June 24th. The at- 
tendance was fairly good and the Royal Arch degree 
was conferred on two candidates. 

Mount Sinai Chapter, No. 44, Napanee. — I made 
my official visit to this Chapter on June 26th, and was 
most kindly received. The spirit of true fraternity 
seems to permeate every part of this Chapter, and 
although no degree was conferred, owing to a lack of 
candidates, the business of the evening was done in a 
thorough manner, all, not a few, taking an active 
interest in it. 

St. Mark's Chapter, No. 26, Trenton. — This, my 
Mother Chapter, was visited on December 17th. The 
Mark Master Mason degree was conferred in a splendid 
manner by Ex. Comp. Maclntyre and his officers. 
This Chapter regrets losing the services of our First 
Principal, owing to his removal to Ayr. Splendid 
progress is still being made in the Chapter. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 89 

The Moira Chapter, No. 7, Belleville. — In 
company with R. Ex. Comp. Spencer, I visited this 
Chapter on the evening of January 7th. The former 
was Installing Officer -on this occasion, and when the 
new officers had taken their places, the Mark Master 
Mason degree was conferred by them, and great credit 
is due them for the excellent manner in which it was 
done. Gratifying progress is being made in this 
Chapter. 

Madoc Chapter, No. 161, Madoc. — This Chapter, 
I visited in company with R. Ex. Comp. Wilkins, on 
January 21st. The working of the Mark Master Mason 
degree was good, but there has been an undercurrent 
of hostility which has not been conducive to the utmost 
harmony, as I see it. Just a little more co-operation 
and they have the makings of as good a Chapter as 
any in the District. This they have promised, and 
their destiny lies in their own hands. While I attended 
this meeting with mingled feelings, not the least being 
one of trepidation, my visit was made exceedingly 
pleasant, by the kindly attention of R. Ex. Comp. 
Watson and others. 

Of course, there was a "Fourth Degree" at every 
one of these meetings, where many fine addresses were 
given by the local Companions, which added greatly 
to the enjoyment of your Superintendent. There are 
good Scribes E. in every Chapter of the District who 
keep their books in right condition. 

After visiting all the Chapters in this District, my 
impressions are, that it is vitally necessary to elect all 
our officers according to ability to fill the positions they 
are to occupy ; that it is necessary to have a goodly 
number of candidates to get the best work from the 
officers ; that every Companion should be heard in 
some part or other of the business of the evening — not 
leave it to the few ; that there must be co-ordination 
of effort on the part of every one in the Chapter to 
accomplish much. 

In conclusion, I wish to thank those Companions 
who placed me in this important position — a position 



90 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

which I fain would have refused — and I trust my 
successor may be able to give as much benefit to the 
several Chapters as he receives therefrom. In this 
I feel I have signally failed. 



Fraternally submitted, 

J. Broatch Little, 
Grand Supt., Prince Edward District, No. XI. 

Trenton, Ont. 



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92 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



ST. LAWRENCE DISTRICT, No. 12. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have the honor to submit my report on the work 
and condition of Capitular Masonry in St. Lawrence 
District, No. 12, for the past year. It is gratifying 
indeed to affirm that all is well with the Royal Craft 
throughout this entire District. 

It cannot be denied that the Great War did affect 
our Chapters in various ways, but the prospects of a 
lasting glorious Peace and Victory has already made 
itself appreciably felt, not only among Royal Arch 
Masons, but throughout the entire Masonic fraternity. 

The Chapters have all been doing good work with 
peace, harmony and goodwill prevailing. In some 
Chapters the average attendance has been disappoint- 
ing, as well as the number of degrees conferred, but 
every recognition must be given to the high quality 
and uniformity of the work, which gives every reason 
for the very brightest optimism. 

After consulting the Chapters I did not consider it 
advisable to hold a Chapter of Instruction during the 
year, the Epidemic of Influenza, fewer railroad trains, 
with increased rates, and the effects of the Great War, 
were some of the reasons for my decision in this regard. 

Sickness interfered with the visit I arranged for 
Maitland Chapter, No. 68, and with this exception, I 
visited each Chapter once, some twice, and my own 
Chapter at almost every meeting. My duties were made 
easy by the uniformity of the work I saw exemplified 
and by the hearty fraternal loyal greetings with which, 
as the representative of the Grand Z., I was everywhere 
received. I found the various Chapter books carefully 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 93 

kept, the dues well collected, and the Chapter pro- 
perties properly insured. 

I am particularly pleased to specially mention the 
work of Grenville Chapter, No. 22, at Prescott, which it 
delights me to report has renewed its activities of former 
days, and also my Mother Chapter, Ancient Frontenac 
and Cataraqui Chapter, No. 1, which, I am sure in 
point of attendance and exaltation of candidates, had a 
record year in its long history. 

Ancient Frontenac and Cataraqui Chapter, 
No. 1, Kingston. — When official visits elsewhere did 
not interfere, I attended all the Convocations of this, 
my own Chapter, giving all possible assistance in the 
large amount of work done during the year. I visited 
officially in December and was introduced by M. Ex. 
Comp. A. Shaw and Ex. Comp. J. H. Birkett, and 
heartily welcomed by Ex. Comp. W. C. Crozier who 
can be justly proud of the Chapter's success during his 
term of office. It is pleasing for me to report that this 
Ancient Chapter, No. 1, is from every standpoint, work, 
finances, attendance, prospects, in an exceedingly 
prosperous condition. M. Ex. Comp. Murch, who has 
not yet fully regained his health, has been much missed 
during the year. The First Principal Elect, Ex. Comp. 
H. J. Milne, loyally backed as he is by all the officers 
and members, promises even greater activities during 
the coming year. I installed the officers for 1919 at 
the regular Convocation in January, with the hearty 
assistance of R. Ex. Comp. W. S. Milne of Toronto. 

Grenville Chapter, No. 22, Prescott. — When 
I started my duties as Grand Superintendent my first 
thoughts were of this Chapter, which for several years 
has not been active. I visited it on two occasions, 
first in May and officially on June 11th, and was highly 
pleased to find a renewed vigor, good work, candidates 
coming in, and every prospect for a bright future. I 
saw the Mark Master Mason degree well done, conferred 
by Ex. Comp. Trench, and I was sorry that both he 
and Scribe E. Wood, in their civil pursuits, had to leave 
Prescott during their term of office. In Ex. Comp. 



94 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Dr. Fleming, this Chapter has a true and faithful 
member of the Craft, and mention should also be made 
of the loyal members who live in Cardinal, seven miles 
further east on the St. Lawrence. It is most pleasing 
for me to report that the optimistic remarks made about 
this Chapter last year in the report of my prede- 
cessor R. Ex. Comp. Dr. Gorrell, are now a happy 
reality. 

Sussex Chapter, No. 59, Brockville. — I visited 
this Chapter at their regular Convocation on February 
21st, and although there were no degrees conferred at 
that meeting, which no doubt affected the attendance, 
the work of opening and closing, and the business of the 
Chapter in the Royal Arch degree was well done. From 
the standpoint of finances and membership, this 
Chapter is in splendid condition, and 10 candidates were 
admitted during the year. First Principal Edwards 
is a loyal enthusiastic Mason, and in Scribe E. Green, 
whose books are exceptionally well kept, the Chapter 
has excellent officials. 

Maitland Chapter, No. 68, North Augusta. — 
This is the Chapter I failed to visit. Its meetings 
were nearly all held on the same evening as my own 
Chapter, and in October when I planned to go, sickness 
prevented. Scribe E. Love assures me, that the 
prospects for the Chapter are good, and although is 
small in numbers, due to a limited jurisdiction, it is 
in a fairly satisfactory condition. With a goodly 
number of enthusiastic members headed by R. Ex. 
Comp. Dr. Waddell it should continue to prosper. 

St. Lawrence Chapter, No. 100, Brockville. — 
My most interesting official visit was to this Chapter 
at the annual election of officers at their December 
meeting. The Royal Arch degree was conferred and 
well done. The attendance was considerably above 
the average, and I would say that we had a very 
enthusiastic meeting. Ex. First Principal Bellamy is 
a splendid officer, and Scribe E Morrison is exceedingly 
capable in recording all laws, acts and transactions, 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 95 

for the good of the Chapter. I brought up the question 
of amalgamation of the two Chapters in Brockville, 
which I am inclined to encourage, and a very interest- 
ing discussion followed, which brought out some good 
points for and against. The banquet held after the 
meeting was equally enjoyable, and the speeches by the 
Mayor of Brockville, and other Companions, were of 
great benefit to the Chapter and the Royal Craft. 
This Chapter it seems to me is unusually well supported 
by many of its Past Principals, and so its future is 
assured, despite the fact that in point of attendance 
and petitions received, this past year was somewhat 
disappointing. 

St. John's Chapter, No. 112, Morrisburg. — I 
visited this Chapter in April, while in Morrisburg on 
business, and again officially in November, when the 
Royal Arch degree was conferred. The work, the 
business and all I saw was well and properly done. 
Ex. First Principal Barclay does his work thoroughly, 
and is strongly supported by all his officers. Scribe E. 
Herring keeps a splendid set of books, and his work 
and enthusiasm is a great asset to the Chapter. Veteran 
members, among whom might be mentioned R. Ex. 
Comp. Davey and Gorrell, and V. Ex. Comp. Marsh, 
continue to take every interest in Royal Arch Masonry, 
thus insuring its continued success in Morrisburg. 
The Chapter is in a splendid condition financially, 
owning a good block of Victory Bonds. It is a matter 
of regret among the members that Ex. Comp. Bar- 
clay is soon to leave Morrisburg to take up residence 
in Ottawa. 

Covenant Chapter, No. 113, Cornwall. — My 
visit to this Chapter was on February 19th, and while 
no degrees were conferred, I saw the Chapter opened 
and closed in the Royal Arch degree. I was kindly 
introduced by R. Ex. Comp. Black and Williams, and 
heartily received by Ex. First Principal Sugden, who 
resides at Mille Roche, 6 miles out of Cornwall. This 
Chapter claims to have felt the effort of the war, but 
is in good condition especially financially. The Chapter 
has a "treasure" in Comp. Ridley the Scribe E., whose 



96 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

books could well be described as being in perfect con- 
dition. The members were unanimous in the hope 
that Grand Chapter would see fit to restore the sash 
as part of the Royal Arch regalia. A splendid "Fourth 
Degree" concluded a very pleasant evening with the 
Cornwall Companions. 

Leeds Chapter, No. 132, Gananoque. — I had 
two visits to this Chapter — first at their December 
meeting, when the annual election of officers took place, 
and whom I had the pleasure of installing when I 
visited on a very stormy night in January. For various 
reasons this Chapter has not been doing as well as I 
would wish to see it, and the reasons why it should 
prosper easily offset any why it should not. A con- 
siderable number of old members and officers have 
unfortunately seen fit to take their demit and very little 
work with only a few meetings, has meant a small 
attendance, and consequent lack of enthusiasm. But 
the Installation meeting was a good one, and Ex. 
Comp. J. J. Davis, who was re-elected First Principal, 
for the third time, has promised to work harder than 
ever in urging the members to attend. In this respect 
I know he will have good support from newly elected 
Scribe E. Valleau, who, I think will be the right man in 
the right place. I have every hope for the future of 
this Chapter. 

In conclusion, I desire to thank the Chapter re- 
presentatives of this District for. electing me to the office 
of Grand Superintendent. I am deeply gratified to the 
Companions for their kind and enthusiastic reception 
accorded to me on my visits, and assure them of my 
continued interest in the Royal Craft, particularly 
in the District which its has been my privilege and 
pleasure to superintend during 1918. 

Fraternally submitted, 

W. Y. Mills, 
Grand Supt., St. Lawrence District, No. 12. 

Kingston, Ont. 





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98 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

OTTAWA DISTRICT, No. 13. 

To the Most Execllent, the Grand First Principal, Officers 
and Companions of the Grand Chapter of Royal 
Arch Arch Masons of Canada. 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have the honor to submit for your consideration 
my report on the condition of Capitular Masonry in 
this District for the past year. During the period, I 
have visited all the Chapters, and taken as a whole 
the outlook may be considered fairly satisfactory. I 
feel that Grand Chapter has reason to be grateful to 
the many officials of constituent Chapters who have 
carried on the work during the recent unsettled state of 
affairs, and it may reasonably be expected, that with the 
return of more normal conditions, Capitular Masonry 
may show substantial progress in this District. 

Laurentian Chapter, No. 151, Pembroke. — My 
first official visit was paid this Chapter on April 18th, 
being accompanied by R. Ex. Comp. Conley and Comp. 
J. B. Illingworth. The attendance was small, accounted 
for in part by the inclemency of the weather. Three 
candidates were advanced to the Mark Master Mason 
degree, which was conferred by Ex. Comp. Leach, in a 
most clear and earnest manner. The subsequent 
removal of this Ex. Companion, from Pembroke, was a 
distinct loss, but there is plenty of material in the 
Chapter for a very capable set of officers, and it is to 
be hoped the Companions may take a greater interest 
in the work and ensure the prosperity of their 
Chapter. 

Maple Chapter, No. 116, Carleton Place. — Ac- 
companied by ten Companions, of Granite Chapter, I 
visited it on May 6th, and we were very kindly received 
by R. Ex. Comp. Mcintosh and the officers who gave 
the Royal Arch degree to two candidates in a very 
interesting and instructive ceremony. After closing, 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 99 

the serving of refreshments and social intercourse 
wound up an enjoyable evening. This Chapter has 
efficient officers and we look to see it make progress. 

BONNECHERE CHAPTER, No. 114, RENFREW. 1 

visited this Chapter on May 31st, being accompanied 
by a number of Companions from Almonte. A Chapter 
of Instruction had been arranged, and it was expected 
that Laurentian Chapter, No. 151, Pembroke, would 
take part, but unfortunately the officers were unable 
to be present. R. Ex. Comp. Conley and the officers of 
Bonnechere Chapter gave the Mark Master Mason 
degree most ably and impressively to three candidates. 
The Most Excellent Master degree was conferred by 
Granite Chapter, No. 61, with V. Ex. Comp. Pollock, 
as W.M., the work being carried out in a very smooth 
and efficient manner. In the evening, Bonnechere 
Chapter exemplified the Royal Arch degree in a way 
deserving every praise, the rendition of the Mystical 
Lecture by V. Ex. Comp. Cox being especially note- 
worthy. The serving of refreshments brought to a 
close a very pleasant day. I desire to make mention 
of the kind interest and assistance invariably afforded 
me by R. Ex. Comp. Conley and his associates of 
Bonnechere Chapter during my tenure of office. 

Glengarry Chapter, No. 143, Maxville. — This 
Chapter was visited on June 28th, in the expectation 
of seeing degree work. Unfortunately the First and 
Second Principals were absent. Past Z. Ex. Comp. 
McDougall took charge of the meeting, at which two 
candidates were balloted for, but neither was in at- 
tendance, and after the serving of refreshments, the 
Companions dispersed. In Ex. Comps. McDougall and 
McDiarmid, the Chapter has capable and zealous 
members, but others appear to lack interest, and this is 
regrettable as the Chapter is situated in a well-to-do 
community and might well be made quite successful. 

Kitchener Chapter, No. 210, Russell. — I at- 
tended the Convocation of this Chapter on August 3rd, 
being accompanied by Ex. Comp. McFarlane and Comp. 
Illingsworth, of Almonte. The Masonic Hall and its 



100 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

appointments are convenient and pleasing, and reflect 
credit on the members of the Order at this place. Three 
candidates were advanced to the Mark Master Mason 
degree by Ex. Comp. Fraser, First Principal, and his 
officers ; the work throughout being uniformly good. 
The books and records are well kept by Comp. Cochrane, 
Scribe E. While the membership of this Chapter is 
not yet large, we found it to be strong as regards the 
enthusiasm of the Companions. At the close of the 
Chapter we were entertained very hospitably. 

St. John's Chapter, No. 148, Vankleek Hill. — I 
visited this Chapter September 6th, and found the 
attendance very fair, Companions being present from 
Hawkesbury and L'Orignal. It seems customary to 
open the Chapter at rather a late hour, and I feel that 
an earlier hour in opening would help in keeping up the 
interest of the members. The Chapter room is well 
furnished and contains many articles of historical value. 
Three candidates were exalted to the Royal Arch degree 
by Ex. Comp. Elvidge, Past Z., assisted by the officers, 
all the work being performed in a very satisfactory 
manner, that of the Principal Sojourner being worthy 
of remark, as well as the giving of the Mystical Lecture 
by Ex. Comp. Jones. We were sorry to leave the 
meeting before its close in order to make a train con- 
nection. 

Granite Chapter, No. 61, Almonte. — I attended 
several meetings during the year and made an official 
visit at the October Convocation, when the Royal 
Arch degree was given in a thoroughly satisfactory way 
by the officers. On my removal from Almonte during 
that month the Companions very kindly presented me 
with an address and Jewel, which were highly appre- 
ciated. I am grateful to the members of this Chapter 
for the assistance and encouragement extended to me 
while filling the office of Grand Superintendent. 

St. Francis Chapter, No. 133, Smith's Falls. — 
This Chapter was found to be in a progressive and 
prosperous condition on my official visit in November. 
The attendance was good, a gratifying feature being the 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 101 

presence of R. Ex. Comps. Craig, Nicholls and Conners. 
The Mark Master Mason degree was conferred on 
several candidates, the rendering of the work being 
highly creditable indeed. The Chapter is fortunate in 
having a capable and zealous staff of officers and we 
certainly look for the continued prosperity of St. 
Francis Chapter. 

Carleton Chapter, No. 16, Ottawa. — It has long 
been the custom for this Chapter to hold an Annual 
Re-union in November, and this has also usually been a 
Chapter of Instruction for the District. It was ac- 
cordingly a considerable disappointment that this was 
impossible the past year owing to the Influenza epidemic. 
I visited the Chapter on December 20th, this being the 
regular Convocation for election of officers, after which 
the Mark Master Mason degree was exemplified by 
Ex. Comp. McCleery and his officers, they fully main- 
taining the high standard for which the work of Carleton 
Chapter is noted. Several Companions from Renfrew 
attended this meeting. After the close of the Chapter 
we were hospitably entertained. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation 
of the many courtesies extended to me by the Com- 
panions of the District on all occasions and to thank 
them for the honor conferred in electing me to the 
position of Grand Superintendent. 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

H. W. Lundy, 
Grand Supt., Ottawa District, No. ij. 

Kingston, Ont. 



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ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 103 



ALGOMA DISTRICT, No. 14. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of ike Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have the honor to submit my report on the con- 
dition of Capitular Masonry in Algoma District, No. 14, 
for the year 1918. 

Officially I have visited every Chapter in the Dis- 
trict, and have pleasure in being able to report most 
favorably upon the general condition of the Royal 
Craft, the efficiency of the officers and the excellent 
manner in which the work is conferred in the various 
Chapters. Particularly are the Chapters in this 
District to be congratulated upon the efficiency of 
their several Scribes. The books and records of each 
and every Chapter have been well kept, finances are 
in fair condition, while an increase of fifty-nine in the 
membership marks the progress made in the District 
during the year. 

Shuniah Chapter, No. 82, Port Arthur. — I visited 
this Chapter on December 18th, and received a hearty 
welcome at the Station at the hands of R. Ex. Comp. 
Freed, Ex. Comp. Evans and Comp. Ray. At the 
regular Convocation in the evening, I had the honor 
of installing the officers for 1919, and feel assured that 
under their guidance this Chapter will continue its 
successful progress. After the Installation Ceremony, 
I took the opportunity of illustrating the correct signs 
in the various degrees. Ex. Comp. Rodden, Scribe E., 
reports a very prosperous year, with an increase of 
twenty-two in membership. The Chapter is to be 
congratulated on having his efficient services again. 
After the Chapter was closed, refreshments were served 
in the banquet room and a most pleasant time spent, 
addresses by R. Ex. Comp. Morgan and Comp. Ray, 
being particularly worthy of attention. 



104 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Golden Chapter, No. 90, Kenora. — I visited this 
Chapter at the regular Convocation on December 20th, 
and was most cordially received by the Companions. 
The Royal Arch degree was conferred in an exemplary 
manner by Ex. Comp. Taylor, assisted by his regular 
officers. The election of officers for the coming year 
was then proceeded with. I was particularly pleased to 
see that the Companions recognized the successful 
efforts of Ex. Comp. Galloway as Scribe E., by their 
refusal to accept his resignation from that office. This 
Chapter has made satisfactory progress during the year 
which will, I trust, continue. I wish to particularly 
commend the progressive spirit shown by Ex. Comp. 
Taylor and the Companions of this Chapter, in under- 
taking fraternal visits in the District. On June 7th, 
Ex. Comp. Taylor and his officers, together with several 
of the Companions, visited Fort William Chapter and 
there conferred the Royal Arch degree, and on August 
15th, they paid a visit to Atwood Chapter, at Rainy 
River. I had the pleasure of accompanying a contin- 
gent of officers and Companions from Albert on Chapter, 
Fort Frances, to Rainy River on that date. A joint 
meeting of the three Chapters was held in the evening, 
when the Royal Arch degree was conferred by Ex. 
Comp. Taylor, assisted by the officers of Alberton and 
Atwood Chapters. We then adjourned to the banquet- 
ing hall where we were delightfully entertained by the 
Rainy River Companions. Such fraternal visits cannot 
be too highly commended, and I hope that we will be 
able to arrange to inter visit more frequently in future. 

Fort William Chapter, No. 140, Fort William. — 
This Chapter was visited on December 19th, an emer- 
gent Convocation having been called to receive me. 
Having been most hospitably entertained by Ex. Comp. 
Forrest, I was escorted to the Chapter, where I was 
made heartily welcome by the Companions. The 
Royal Arch degree was conferred in an excellent manner 
by the Ex. Z., and his officers. This Chapter has made 
notable progress during the year, having added fourteen 
new Companions to its roll, and this progress will surely 
be continued under the direction of the newly elected 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 105 

officers. Ex. Comp. Underhill has relinquished his 
office as Scribe E. : a worthy successor has, I think, been 
found in Ex. Comp. Moors. 

Attwood Chapter, No. 149, Rainy River. — I was 
accompanied by several of the Companions of Alberton 
Chapter when I officially visited it on March 20th, 1919. 
I was welcomed by Ex. Comp. Murdoch and the Com- 
panions. The Mark Master degree was conferred in an 
efficient manner by the Ex. Z., and his officers. I had 
the honor of conferring the degree of a Past Z. upon 
Ex. Comp. Barrets, and of presenting to him, on behalf 
of his Chapter, a valuable P.Z's. jewel. I twice during 
the year had the pleasure of visiting this Chapter, and 
it has been impressed upon me that the Companions 
of this Chapter have got into the habit of relying upon 
R. Ex. Comp. Gorham, Ex. Comp. McGregor and Ex. 
Comp. Race to fill the junior officers' chairs at the 
Convocations, with the result that the junior officers 
are not as efficient as they should be. This Chapter 
made no progress during 1918, but' the interest has 
seemingly now revived as several candidates are 
coming forward, so that this year promises good results. 

Alberton Chapter, No. 152, Fort Frances. — 
I have been present at nearly every Convocation of 
this, my home Chapter, during the year. My official 
visit was paid at the regular Convocation in December, 
when the Royal Arch degree was conferred upon two 
candidates by Ex. Comp. Campbell in a most efficient 
manner. This Chapter is now in a very healthy con- 
dition, and is fortunate in having a number of Past 
Principals, who always keep their work up to date, 
and are always willing to impart their knowledge to 
their Companions. At the January Convocation, I 
had the honor of installing the officers for this year. 
Ex. Comp. Walker and his officers are now putting on 
the work in a most satisfactory manner, a distinct 
improvement being noticeable in the zeal of the Junior 
Officers, which materially assists in the smooth working 
of the degrees. Ex. Comp. Clark has lately inaugurated 
a musical accompaniment in the various degrees with 
verv beneficial results. 



106 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

In conclusion, I wish to heartily thank the Com- 
panions of this District for the honor conferred upon 
Alberton Chapter, No. 152, by the election, for the 
first time, of one of its members, in my person, to the 
distinguished office of Grand Superintendent, and I 
also wish to express by appreciation of the kindness and 
courtesy extended to me by the Companions of each 
and every Chapter in the District, and for the sincere 
welcome accorded to me on my visits. 

Fraternally submitted, 

D. J. GlLLON. 

Grand Supt., Algoma District, No. 14. 
Fort Frances, Ont. 



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108 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



MANITOBA EAST DISTRICT, No. 15. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada. 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I herewith submit my report as Grand Superin- 
tendent, on the condition of Capitular Masonry in this 
District for the year 1918. 

All the Chapters in this District are in fairly good 
condition, although the work was somewhat dis- 
organized, owing to Convocations not being held during 
the fall and early winter on account of the Influenza 
epidemic. I visited every Chapter in the District 
and find that they are all looking forward to carrying 
on their work with high hopes of greater and continued 
success, now that the war is over, andconditions are 
becoming more normal. 

The Companions in this District are looking forward 
to the Grand Convocation to be held at Winnipeg in 
May, and consider it a high honor to have the Grand 
Chapter meeting in this District. 

Prince Rupert Chapter, No. 52, Winnipeg. — I 
visited this Chapter on February 26th, Ex. Comp. S. 
Baird of Rabboni Chapter, No. 171, accompanying me. 
A joint Convocation was held by this Chapter and 
Connaught Chapter, No. 187. The Chapter is in 
excellent condition, and the ofhcers are very earnest 
and faithful in the discharge of their duties. The 
Royal Arch degree was conferred in an excellent manner. 
We had the pleasure of a visit on this occasion from the 
M. Ex. Comp. A. S. Gorrell, Grand First Principal, 
who gave us a very interesting and inspiring address. 

Keystone Chapter, No. 99, Portage la Prairie. 
— I visited this Chapter on March 7th. Things had 
not apparently been going very well in this Chapter 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 109 

until a short time ago. We had a fairly good meeting, 
however, with an attendance of about 15. I installed 
the officers and talked over the situation with the 
members very fully, and I am satisfied that conditions 
will improve. The Chapter has been held together 
by a few zealous and faithful Companions who have 
been doing their utmost to keep things going. R. Ex. 
Comp. Newman, who had always been a very active 
member of the Chapter, had for the past two or three 
years been prevented from giving much of his time and 
attention to the work, but assured me on the occasion 
of my visit that he had made arrangements to give a 
considerable part of his time to the Chapter affairs, 
and I am satisfied that it will not be long before Key- 
stone Chapter will be one of the best in the District. 

King Edward Chapter, No. 136, Neepawa. — I 
visited this Chapter on March 26th, with Comp. C. W. 
McLachlin. A special Convocation was held in the 
afternoon at which the Mark Master and Most Ex- 
cellent Master degrees were conferred. In the evening 
the Royal Arch degree was very impressively conferred 
by V. Ex. Comp. Wemyss. I was particularly pleased 
with the interest taken by the Past Principals. There 
were no less than nine present at the Convocation. A 
slight variation from the usual procedure was made, 
the Companions having arranged for a dinner at 6.30, 
instead of the usual banquet late in the evening. A 
number of the Companions attending were from the 
country, and it was thought that this arrangement 
would be more suitable. I think it was a good idea, 
particularly where there are members coming in from a 
distance ; the Companions are thereby enabled to 
reach home at a much earlier hour than otherwise. 
The conditions of the Chapter are excellent, and there 
are some of the most earnest students of Capitular 
Masonry taking an active interest in its affairs. 

Rabboni Chapter, No. 171, Dauphin. — I officially 
visited this Chapter on January 14th. The affairs of 
this Chapter are splendidly managed. This is the 
Chapter of which I am an active member, and I have 



110 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

visited it on numerous occasions. I was well received 
on my official visit, and this Chapter appreciates fully 
the honor of having one of its members as Grand 
Superintendent for the District. The officers of this 
Chapter are all young men, and are very enthusiastic, 
and they are splendidly supported by several of the 
Past Principals, among whom I might mention R. Ex. 
Comp. J. W. Johnston, a Past Grand Superintendent, 
who seldom misses a Convocation, and by his faithful 
and zealous work is a great help and inspiration to the 
officers and members. This Chapter is holding a Con- 
vocation in April at which they have something like 
twenty-five candidates on whom to confer the three 
degrees. 

CONNAUGHT CHAPTER, No. 187, WINNIPEG. 1 

officially visited this Chapter on February 26th, at the 
joint Convocation, referred to in my report of Prince 
Rupert Chapter. The officers of Connaught Chapter 
occupied the chairs. The conditions in this Chapter 
are also first class. An estimable feature is the splendid 
harmony existing between this Chapter and Prince 
Rupert Chapter. The Holy Royal Arch degree was 
conferred on this occasion by the officers of this Chapter, 
and it was well and impressively conferred. I was 
particularly pleased with the manner in which the 
degree was received by the candidates, and the remarks 
of one of the candidates at the subsquent banquet held 
in the evening, were proof that a splendid impression 
was made. After the labors of the evening were ended, 
the brethren assembled in the banquet hall, R. Ex. 
Comp. W. F. Taylor, occupying the chair, and a number 
of interesting addresses were made by Companions. 

In concluding my report, I desire to express my 
deep appreciation of the honor of being Superintendent 
of this District, and to express my sincere thanks to the 
officers and Companions for the loyal support at all 
times accorded me, and my gratitude for their great 
kindness on all occasions. 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

Robert Hawkins, 
Grand Supt., Manitoba East District, No. 15. 
Dauphin, Man. 



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112 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



MANITOBA WEST DISTRICT, No. 16. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I take this opportu-iity of expressing my sincere 
appreciation of the honor conferred on me by the 
representatives of the District in recommending me 
to the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., and to him for 
the appointment to so responsible a position as Grand 
Superintendent. 

The work has been light, as harmony prevails 
throughout the District, and the presence of the Past 
Principals, in most of the Chapters, is very encouraging, 
as it aids in keeping up the interest, and insures 
efficiency in the administration of the affairs of the 
Chapter. 

I was very anxious to have, at least, two Chapters 
of Instruction for the District during my term of office. 
I first brought the matter up in my own Chapter, and 
the Companions assured me they would go to Corin- 
thian Chapter on November 13th, to attend a Chapter 
of Instruction and confer the Royal Arch degree ; a 
few days previous to the Convocation, R. Ex. Comp. 
Johnston iaformed me by telephone, that they were 
compelled to cancel the meeting, owing to the epidemic 
of " Influenza" which was spreading so rapidly through- 
out the District. 

Mount Sinai Chapter, No. 183, Rivers, Man. — I 
visited this Chapter on Friday, February 21st, and 
was cordially received by the officers and Companions. 
The attendance was small, but enthusiastic. Rivers 
is a divisional point on the G.T.P. Railway, and the 
Chapter suffers from frequent removals which prevents 
a continuity of promotions in the higher offices ; and 
also through the Railway Company removing a portion 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 113 

of their shops, which has reduced the Chapter member- 
ship, as well as opportunities for new members. Ex. 
Comp. Payne, Scribe E., is very attentive to his duties. 
The officers and Companions all feel, that 1919 will 
give them their share of prosperity, and, as they have 
the right amount of enthusiasm, I am sure their efforts 
will be successful. 

Keystone Chapter, No 141, Brandon, Man. — 
My official visit was made to this Chapter on March 
3rd, when I was well received and hospitably enter- 
tained. Ex. Comp. C. S. Marshall conferred the Most 
Excellent Master degree in a very pleasing manner. 
I believe the prospects of Keystone Chapter are some- 
what brighter than they have been, in the past, however, 
there is still room for improvement, and if more of the 
Companions would interest themselves to a greater 
extent, the officers would be much more encouraged 
in their work and the results, would, I am certain, be 
greatly beneficial to the Chapter as well as to Royal 
Arch "Masonry in general. I must congratulate this 
Chapter on its having such an energetic and capable 
Scribe E. as R. Ex. Comp. Crawford. 

Corinthian Chapter, No. 101, Boissevain, Man. 
— Wednesday, March 12th, was selected for my official 
visit to Corinthian Chapter. On my arrival, I was 
received by R. Ex. Comp. Johnston and was very 
hospitably entertained by him while in the city. The 
Chapter was opened promptly at 8 o'clock. I was 
introduced by R. Ex. Comp. Johnston, and received 
with Grand Honors, after which I had an opportunity 
of observing the manner in which Chapter business 
was conducted, which was done Masonically, and in 
conformity with business methods. The First Principal 
being unavoidably absent, V. Ex. Comp. F. G. Fox 
presided. While there was no degree work conferred, 
I have had the pleasure of seeing the officers of Corin- 
thian Chapter confer the different degrees on several 
occasions in a very satisfactory manner. On my 
examination of the books of R. Ex. Comp. Johnston, 
Scribe E., I found them very neatly and accurately 
kept ; I also found the Scribe E. an authority on the 



114 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Constitution and Regulations governing Royal Arch 
Masonry. 

Avondale Chapter, No. 156, Hartney, Man. — 
This being my home Chapter, I have been present at 
every Convocation during the year. The Chapter is in 
a very healthy condition, the attendance is good, and 
the rendition of the work is worthy of commendation. 
This Chapter is fortunate in having a number of Past 
Principals who keep well posted in the work, and are 
ready at any time to assist in conferring degrees. On 
the examination of the books of Comp. Foote, who is 
Scribe E., and one of the most efficient under the 
Jurisdiction of the Grand Chapter of Canada, I found 
they were well kept and gave a complete record of all 
business transactions. 

While the District has not received many new 
members, during the year, all of the Chapters have 
advanced some candidates. The depressing effects 
of the war are passing, and the future prospects for the 
District are brightening. 

, Before closing this report, I wish again to thank 
the Companions for their many courtesies extended to 
me during the year ; I have endeavored to discharge 
my duties of the office to the best of my ability, and if 
I failed in any way, it was not for the want of an honest 
effort on my part. 

Fraternally submitted, 

A. E. Fry, 
Grand Supt. Manitoba W. District, No. 16. 

Hartney, Man. 



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116 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



BRITISH COLUMBIA DISTRICT, No. 17. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I herewith submit my report, as Grand Superin- 
tendent, on the condition of Capitular Masonry in this 
District for the year 1918. 

During my term of office, I visited every Chapter 
but two. Owing to the prevalence of the Influenza 
epidemic, I was not able, however, to visit as much as 
I had wished. 

Vancouver Chapter, No. 98, Vancouver. — I 
visited this Chapter on October 9th, accompanied by 
Ex. Comps. Bennett and Davies. The Royal Arch 
degree was conferred on eight candidates. The work 
was well done, all the officers being efficient. It is not 
necessary to say that the books being in the hands of 
R. Ex. Comp. Burns are in good shape. We spent a 
social hour in the banqueting room. 

Westminster Chapter, No. 124, New West- 
minster. — This being my own Chapter, I have attended 
all meetings. I visited it officially on December 20th, 
when the Royal Arch degree was conferred on two 
candidates, the officers all showing great pains in 
their work. On January 10th, with the assistance of 
Ex. Comps. Chapman, Ferguson and Bennett, I had the 
pleasure of installing the officers for 1919. The books 
of this Chapter could not be in better shape. 

Keystone Chapter, No. 127, Nanaimo. — I visited 
on June 19th this Chapter, and was cordially received 
by the Companions. There was a large attendance ; 
Camoson Chapter, No. 182, Victoria, was paying a 
fraternal visit, and conferring the Royal Arch degree 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 117 

on four candidates in almost a perfect manner. Key- 
stone has an efficient lot of officers. A pleasant time 
was spent in the banqueting room. 

Cyrus Chapter, No. 142, Cumberland. — I have 
tried to arrange a meeting, but regret to say that I was 
unable to do so. I hope, now the strenuous times we 
have been passing through are over, that the Chapter 
will be able to recover itself. ,.„_ 

Kaien Chapter, No. 178, Prince Rupert.— This 
Chapter being situated 500 miles up the Coast, I regret 
that I have not been able to visit it, but from all ac- 
counts, which I have heard, the affairs of this Chapter 
are in good shape. 

Camoson Chapter, No. 182, Victoria. — I visited 
this Chapter on September 25th, when I was royally 
received. I had the pleasure of seeing the Royal Arch 
degree conferred on two candidates by Columbia 
Chapter, No. 120 G.R. of Scotland, who were paying 
a fraternal visit. The affairs of Camoson Chapter 
are in good shape and have an efficient lot of officers. 
We had a very pleasant hour in the banqueting room. 

Pacific Chapter, No. 190, Vancouver. — Accom- 
panied by Ex. Comps. Bennett and Davies, I visited 
this Chapter on December 9th, at their regular Con- 
vocation ; the business of the evening was well con- 
ducted, and the Royal Arch degree conferred in good 
form. I find the books of the Chapter kept in good 
shape, and a bright future ahead of it. 

North Vancouver, No. 191, North Vancouver. — 
I visited this Chapter on March 11th, 1919, at their 
regular Convocation. There was not a large attend- 
ance. I predict a good year for this Chapter. On the 
night of my visit they received three applications for 
exaltation. I found the books neatly kept. 

In conclusion, I desire to express my thanks for 
having had the honor of filling the position of Grand 
Superintendent, and wish to thank the Companions 



118 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

for the many courtesies extended to me on my several 

visits. 

Sincerely hoping that my endeavors may even in a 
slight manner have the effect of advancing Capitular 
Masonry in this District. 



Fraternally submitted, 

John G. Gamon, 
Grand Supt., British Columbia Dist., No. iy \ 

New Westminster, B.C., March 17th, 1919. 



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120 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



KOOTENAY DISTRICT, No. 18. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

In presenting my report for this District on the 
condition of Capitular Freemasonry, I regret that I 
have been unable to visit any but my Mother Chapter, 
Rocky Mountain, No. 125, owing to sickness and other 
Masonic duties. I was indeed surprised that I had 
been appointed for a second term, and it was with a 
great deal of reluctance that I accepted it, and now I 
feel that it would have been better had I not done so. 

The report received from Nelson, No. 123, is not 
very encouraging. I cannot understand this condition, 
as there are some very enthusiastic Freemasons in that 
Chapter. 

For the second year, I have no report from Kootenay, 
No. 120. I have been present at every Convocation of 
my own Chapter, Rocky 'Mountain, No. 125, and must 
say that we have a very efficient set of officers and the 
work of the three degrees is splendid. The prospects 
of this Chapter are excellent. 

Again let me urge upon the officers of Grand Chapter 
to endeavor to visit this part of the world a little more 
often than has been done in the past. In Cranbrook, 
it is over ten years since we had the pleasure of enter- 
taining an officer of Grand Chapter. 

Fraternally submitted, 

A. C. Shankland, 
Grand Supt., Kootenay Dist. No. 18. 

Cranbrook, B.C. 



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122 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



YALE-COLUMBIA DISTRICT, No. 19 

To the Most Excellent the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : • 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

It is with pleasure that I submit my report on the 
condition of Capitular Masonry in this District for the 
year past. 

Revelstoke Chapter, No. 128, Revelstoke. — In 
company with R. Ex. Comp. Plewman, of Rossland, I 
/isited this Chapter September 3rd, 1918, the Com- 
panions kindly arranging a special meeting for my 
convenience. The Royal Arch degree was well con- 
ferred by the First Principal, Ex. Comp. D. Adams, 
and his staff of officers. The Scribe E., Comp. C. J. 
Aman, has the books well kept and the dues attended 
to, so that the finances are in a flourishing condition. 
The fine hall in which the Chapter meets is owned by 
the local fraternity. Now that the war is happily 
over, I believe this Chapter will forge ahead. 

Boundary Chapter, No. 174, Grand Forks. — I 
visited, September 11th, 1918, this Chapter. The 
veteran, R. Ex. Comp. W. J. Cook, is still the Scribe E., 
which is sufficient to say that the books and business 
affairs of the Chapter are well looked after. It was 
found impracticable to put on any work, but a pleasant 
evening was spent, winding up with a war-time repast. 
Ex. Comp. McKie was in the chair. Some of the Com- 
panions travelled twenty miles to attend this meeting. 

Kelowna Chapter, No. 206, Kelowna. — I visited 
;his Chapter September 13th, 1918. The Royal Arch 
legree was conferred by the First Principal, Ex. Comp. 
Sutherland, who is also the Mayor of this thriving 
t )wn. The work was so ably conferred that it would 
h ive been a credit to any Chapter. The Companions 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 123 

are enthusiastic and, with local conditions being so 
prosperous, the future of this Chapter seems very 
bright. 

Okanagan Chapter, No. 157, Vernon. — Follow- 
ing the Kelowna meeting and according to notification 
I visited Vernon, but the Companions were apparently 
unable to hold a meeting to receive me. For a town 
the size of Vernon and with the fine country tributary 
to it, this was very disappointing. From conversation 
with the Companions, the finances are in good shape, 
but the arrears of dues need attention. 

Rossland Chapter, No. 122, Rossland. — I have 
attended all the meetings of this, my mother Chapter, 
except during my absence in England. For some time 
the mines have only been working in a small way, 
and many have been compelled to move to other 
places. Notwithstanding this, two new members have 
been admitted this year and two more are on the way. 
The only official visit was when I installed and invested 
the officers for the present year, and had the pleasure 
of presenting Ex. Comp. Embleton with a Past First 
Principal's jewel in recognition of his work during 1918. 
R. Ex. Comp. Plewman again occupies the First Prin- 
cipal's chair, after a lapse of eleven years, and he is 
well supported by the other officers. After readjust- 
ment following the war, it is expected that the mines 
will work on a larger scale than ever. 

In conclusion, I wish to thank the Companions for 
the honor conferred upon me and for the way my 
visits were made pleasant and entertaining. Good 
feeling and harmony prevailing, my work was made 
easy, and I shall always look back with pleasure to 
my year of office. 

Speaking generally, the attendance in the Chapters 
in the District and the influx of candidates has been 
seriously hampered by the war, but there is a small 
and faithful band who keep the good work going and 
look forward to the brighter times ahead. In the early 
winter the influenza ranged through the District and 



124 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

all meetings were prohibited for some months. This, 
of course, reduced the number of meetings. 

I regret that this report is somewhat tardy, but it 
is due entirely to the fact that I was unexpectedly de- 
tained in England. 



Fraternally submitted, 

A. M. Betts, 
Grand Supt., Yale-Columbia District, No. ig. 

Rossland, B.C. 



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126 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



SASKATCHEWAN NORTH DISTRICT, No. 20. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have the honor to submit, for your consideration, 
my report on the condition of Capitular Masonry in 
the Saskatchewan North District, No. 20, for the year 
1918. 

During the year I visited every Chapter in the 
District, some of them several times. I noted their 
condition from fraternal, ritualistic and financial stand- 
points, as well as the manner in which the various books 
of each Chapter are kept, and I am pleased to say, 
all are in excellent condition, if only a little more atten- 
tion was given to the collection of the outstanding 
dues in a few cases. 

My reception by the officers and Companions of 
the Chapters has been uniformly cordial and courteous, 
and every suggestion offered has been very graciously 
accepted. No irregularities of any consequence have 
occurred, nothing has developed tending to disturb 
the harmony prevailing, and it is a matter of gratifica- 
tion to be able to say, that as far as I know, the Com- 
panions in every Chapter in the District are fulfilling 
their duties and obligations as Masons. 

Saskatoon Chapter, No. 165, Saskatoon. — My 
official visit to this Chapter was made on the evening of 
September 20th, and to which I had looked forward 
with pleasure on account of valued acquaintance with a 
large number of its members. Nor was I disappointed 
in my reception, when a number of the more loyal and 
enthusiastic members turned out to welcome me, 
though few in number, as compared with the member- 
ship of this Chapter, which is the largest in the District. 
Their Chapter room is commodious, well equipped, 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 127 

with first class furnishings and paraphernalia, and had 
any degree work been available for the evening, I am 
sure all the proper officers would have been at their 
posts, and demonstrated their ability in keeping up 
the high standard set by their predecessors. Ex. 
Comp. Hawkins, the First Principal, gave proof of his 
ability in conferring certain parts of the several degrees 
as requested, and knowing, as I do, the earnestness, 
sincerity and ability of R. Ex. Comps. Crandon, Orme 
and Blackwoo 1, as well as a number of the other officers, 
I feel that this Chapter is indeed fortunate. Comp. 
Pow, Scribe E., is very attentive to his duties, his books 
written up to date, and the success of the Chapter is 
partly due to his untiring efforts. At the close of the 
Chapter, a pleasant repast was served where the best 
of good fellowship prevailed. 

Prince Albert Chapter, No. 160, Prince Albert. 
— I visited this Chapter officially, on October 15th, 
when Ex. Comp. W. E. Bristowe, and his officers, 
conferred the Mark Master and Most Excellent degrees 
in a very excellent manner. This Chapter is the oldest 
in the District, and the work done by its officers still 
maintains the high standard of excellence it. has always 
been known to display in the past. This Chapter has 
excellent appointments, a splendid room for doing 
good work, and I cannot refrain from making special 
comment upon the high grade furniture and furnishings 
to be found therein. I most heartily congratulate the 
Companions on providing such an attractive home for 
the Royal Craft in their midst. The Chapter books 
are kept in a very efficient manner by Ex. Comp. 
McMillan the Scribe E. After the work of conferring 
the degrees and some discussion on the work, we 
adjourned to the "Fourth Degree." 

Battleford Chapter, No. 181, Battleford. — 
The Companions of this Chapter received me officially 
on the afternoon and evening of October 17th. 
This Chapter has had a most successful year under the 
able guidance of Ex. Comp. Dr. H. E. Ewart, and the 
ever willing hand of Comp. W. R. Ridington, the Scribe 



128 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

E., to assist in every way possible; in fact the number of 
members has practically doubled owing, I think, to 
his untiring efforts. In the departure of R. Ex. Comp. 
N. T. Brown, to another city, the Chapter has suffered 
a severe loss as he was for many years the mainstay 
of the Chapter. In the afternoon the Mark Master 
Mason and Most Excellent degrees were conferred 
upon two candidates by the Ex. Comps. Ewart and 
Bond, assisted by their officers, in a most creditable 
manner. In the evening the Holy Royal Arch was 
faultlessly conferred by First Principal Ex. Comp. 
Dr. Ewart, assisted by Ex. Comp. D. McLeay. I 
congratulate this Chapter in having such spacious and 
elegantly furnished quarters as well as a goodly number 
of intelligent, sincere young Companions who have, 
during the year, enrolled themselves under the banner, 
whereby the precepts of Capitular Masonry may be 
brightened and strengthened in the upbuilding of their 
fellowmen. The books are perfectly and neatly kept 
by Comp. W. R. Ridington, who is one of the most 
efficient Scribe E's it has been my pleasure to meet. 
I cannot speak too highly of this Chapter as the officers 
are efficient and enthusiastic, and it has no doubt a 
bright future. After the business of the evening was 
over, we spent a pleasant hour around the festive Board, 
and the hospitality shown by the Companions, parti- 
cularly Ex. Comp. McLeay, at whose home I was the 
guest, will long be remembered. 

Humboldt Chapter, No. 209, Humboldt. — I paid 
my official visit to this Chapter on December 19th, 
and was royally welcomed by the Companions, although 
I had made arrangements to visit it the month previous, 
when ten candidates were in readiness to receive their 
degrees, but owing to the epidemic of Influenza it was 
deemed advisable to postpone the meeting, and con- 
sequently, I did not have the pleasure of seeing the 
work conferred. As this was the meeting for the 
election of officers I had an opportunity of seeing _ the 
Chapter in its routine business, which was done in a 
decorous manner. Having been previously advised 
that they would have no work on hand, I notified them 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 129 

that I would expect to see the Royal Arch work ex- 
emplified, and they very graciously complied with my 
request. I, therefore, saw the Royal Arch degree 
performed upon two of their young members in a very 
effective manner by the First Principal Ex. Comp. 
O. W. Andreasen, and his capable officers. Although 
the youngest Chapter in the District, their work is 
fully equal if not better than the oldest. I was parti- 
cularly pleased with their close attention to details in 
the preparation of the Chapter to confer this degree. 
The Companions of this Chapter are enthusiastic in 
the work and the material is of the best and under the 
guidance of Ex. Comp. Andreasen, Wallace, Yoerger 
and Russell, I am quite certain it will continue in its 
prosperity. Comp. H. Cheethem, the Scribe E., is 
loyal, thorough, and needless to say has his books in 
good shape. Their Chapter room, I think is second to 
none in the District. It is furnished beautifully, is 
commodious, comfortable and neat. I enjoyed the 
visit to this Chapter very much and while in Humboldt 
had the pleasure of staying at Ex. Comp. Andreasen's 
beautiful home. 

King George Chapter, No. 207, Yorton. — I 
visited this Chapter officially on December 26th. It 
being my home Chapter, I have been in attendance at 
all the meetings during the year, and on this occasion 
was greeted with a good turn out of the Companions. 
The Mark Master Mason, Most Excellent Master and 
Royal Arch degrees were conferred on a class of candi- 
dates by the following officers : Ex. Comp. C. R. 
Bull conferred the Mark Master Mason degree ; the 
Most Excellent Master degree was conferred by Ex. 
Comp. F. J. Moritz, and the Royal Arch degree was 
conferred by Ex. Comp. D. McLeay, the First Principal, 
who also gave the obligations in the first two degrees, 
and have pleasure in stating, that the degrees were in 
each case conferred in a correct, capable and impressive 
manner. This Chapter regrets exceedingly the loss 
of Ex. Comp. McLeay who has been transferred to 
Battleford, but what has been Yorkton's loss has been 
Battleford's gain, and I am pleased to know he still 



130 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

keeps up his interest in Masonry by assisting the 
Companions of the town in every way possible. The 
books are kept in good shape by Comp. Holmes, and the 
conditions of the Chapter generally are everything 
to be desired. After the work of the evening 
was concluded we repaired to the banquet table where 
an enjoyable time was spent. 

In conclusion, I desire to express grateful apprecia- 
tion of the honor conferred upon me of being elected 
to this high office and the uniform courtesy and kindness 
with which I have been received throughout the Dis- 
trict, and I hope that my efforts in fulfilling the duties 
incumbent upon me may have some good results. 



Fraternally submitted, 

T. F. Acheson, 
Grand Supt., Saskatchewan North District, No. 20. 

Yorkton, Sask. 



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SASKATCHEWAN WEST DISTRICT, No. 21. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have the honor to submit my report on the condi- 
tion of Capitular Masonry in this District : 

Assiniboia Chapter, No. 208, Assiniboia. — This 
Chapter has had a most successful year and has ex- 
cellent prospects for 1919. 

Moose Jaw Chapter, No. 162, Moose Jaw. — 
With the Officers in charge and the past Principals this 
Chapter could not help but have a successful year. 

Estevan Chapter, No. 180, Estevan. — I have 
been in constant communication with both the Scribe 
E. and First Principal of this Chapter and can safely 
say the Chapter has had a most successful year. 

Shaunavon Chapter, No. 211, Shaunavon. — This 
Chapter has had a successful year, but was seriously 
handicapped during the last half of the year, having 
its property destroyed by fire and have only recently 
been able to get it replaced. I propose holding a Chap- 
ter of Instruction there this month. 

Weyburn Chapter, No. 173, Weyburn. — This 
Chapter is in a very healthy and prosperous condition, 
and I look for big progress from it in 1919. 

Unity Chapter, No. 186, Swift Current. — Al- 
though we did not increase our membership as much 
as usual this year, owing largely to the fact of having 
to discontinue meetings for several months during the 
epidemic of Influenza, we had a very successful year, 
the degree work being splendidly done, with a good 
average attendance of members. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 133 

In conclusion, I would like to express my regret at 
not being able to visit all the Chapters. I had planned 
to visit them all in the District during November, but, 
owing to the unfortunate epidemic that prevailed at 
that time, prevented me carrying out my plan. 



Fraternally submitted, 

M. C. C. James. 
Grand Supt., Saskatchewan West District, No. 21, 

Swift Current, Sask. 



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ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 135 



SASKATCHEWAN EAST DISTRICT, No. 22. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have much pleasure in submitting for your con- 
sideration my report on the condition of Capitular 
Masonry in Saskatchewan East District, No. 22, for 
1918. 

There has been a general brightening up of the Royal 
Craft in this District since the cessation of hostilities, 
but the outbreak of the Influenza epieemie necessitated 
the closing of the Chapters during the fall, and some had 
to remain closed during the early winter. I had 
planned to visit the Chapters in the fall, but had to 
postpone my visits until later. The tabulated report 
of meetings held, is not an index to the condition of the 
Chapters throughout the District, ,as they had no option, 
but to close during some of the months in which they 
are usually most active. 

I officially visited the Chapters as follows : Trinity, 
No. 192, Melville, October 10th ; Golden Compass, 
No. 170, Sintaluta, February 25th ; Moose Mountain, 
No. 166, Areola, March 6th ; Wascana, No. 121, 
Regina, March 10th ; Orient, No. 194, Moosomin, on 
March 19th ; Govan, No. 193, at Govan, April 1st, 
and I wish to thank the Companions for the cordial 
reception and many courtesies extended to me. 

I found peace and harmony prevailing in every 
Chapter. As in civil life citizens are talking recon- 
struction so in every Chapter. I found that the Com- 
panions are earnestly striving to build up their Chapters, 
so as to properly fit in with the new conditions. Material 
seems to be coming forward more freely and the coming 
year will see great advancement. Thanks to the 



136 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

efficient work of my predecessors, I find good work 
being done in all the Chapters. 

Wascana Chapter, No. 121, Regina. — This being 
my home Chapter, it is hard to give an unprejudiced 
estimate of its progress. The Companions are becom- 
ing more interested in the study of the Craft and of 
its value to them as citizens. During the year, several 
talks have been given on subjects relating to Capitular 
Masonry. The interest taken in these discussions 
and larger attendance, when such are announced, 
augur well. Our Chapter has been highly honored by 
having one of our Companions, M. Ex. Comp. A. S. 
Gorrell, filling the chair of Grand First Principal. 
He honored and clelighted us on the night of my official 
visit, by an address on the General Work of Grand 
Chapter, throughout Canada, which was delivered in 
his usual happy and entertaining manner. 

Moose Mountain Chapter, No. 166, Arcola. — 
This has been one of the weaker Chapters, and has 
suffered many drawbacks. The brunt of the hard 
time struggle has been borne alone by Ex. Comp. 
Gibson for several years, but for the coming year the 
new officers are taking hold in such an energetic and 
efficient manner, that good progress will be made. My 
visit to this Chapter was a pleasant one as I had not 
visited it since the date of its institution when I re- 
ceived the degrees from R. Ex. Comp. Shaw, the late 
R. Ex. Comp. Meek and R. Ex., now M. Ex. Comp. 
Gorrell. The breezy manner in which M. Ex. Comp. 
Gorrell put the junior officers and candidates through 
their work will always remain in my memory. 

Golden Compass Chapter, No. 170, Sintaluta. — 
This Chapter has not made much progress for a few 
years, but the Companions assure me that the obstacles 
have been cleared away and judging from the excellent 
work I saw done, good progress can be expected. 

Trinity Chapter, No. 192, Melville. — This is a 
bright spot in Capitular Masonry, excellent work is 
done in the Chapter, but the Companions are to be 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 137 

congratulated on the manner in which they handle the 
Fourth degree. After every Convocation the Com- 
panions assemble around the festive board, and after 
light refreshment and social chatter, have a couple 
of addresses or papers read on Masonic, or subjects 
of general educational value. On the night I was 
present, a doctor and a druggist each gave a paper on a 
subject, on which they were qualified to speak, both 
were very interesting and instructive. More of this 
kind of work could be profitably done in other Chapters. 

Govan Chapter, No. 193, Govan. This Chapter 
is making good progress. I frequently have the pri- 
vilege of meeting the Companions who are energetic. 
Their Convocations are always interesting and their 
work well done. 

Orient Chapter, No. 194, Moosomin. — This 
Chapter has a number of capable, well skilled and en- 
thusastic Companions who are doing good work. On 
the night of my visit a discussion on how they could 
welcome home the Companions from the front, and the 
relation that should exist between the Chapter and the 
families of such Companions, showed that while doing 
ritual work the spirit behind the same has not been 
overlooked. 

In conclusion, I wish to thank the Companions for 
the honor they conferred upon me in electing me as 
Grand Superintendent of this District, and trust that 
I may have the privilege and pleasure of visiting your 
Chapter from time to time. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Francis B. Reilly, 
Grand Supt., Saskatchewan East District, No. 22. 

Regina, Sask. 



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ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 139 



NEW ONTARIO DISTRICT, No. 23. 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand First Principal, Officers 
and Companions of the Grand Chapter of Royal 
Arch Masons of Canada : 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have the honor to present my report on the 
condition of Capitular Masonry in New Ontario 
District, No. 23. 

During my term of office, I have visited every 
Chapter in the District, in my official capacity, and I 
would be remiss if I did not express the appreciation 
I feel, for the courteous treatment I received; there was 
nothing left undone by the Chapters in their efforts 
to show respect to the Grand Chapter which I was 
privileged to represent. 

On July 24th, I had the pleasure of instituting 
Northern Lights Chapter, U.D. at Timmins. Accom- 
panying me on this occasion were R. Ex. Comps. C. W. 
Haentschel and F. W. Haynes ; Ex. Comps. F. H. 
Todd, Jas. Taylor, M. McLeod and the officers of 
Cobalt Chapter, No. 203, and Temiskaming Chapter, 
No. 169. The new Chapter received a splendid start, 
having twenty Charter members. Thirty-two petitions 
were received and seventeen candidates were exalted 
at the opening meeting ; Cobalt Chapter working the 
Mark and Most Excellent Master degrees, and Temis- 
kaming Chapter the Royal Arch. Great credit is due 
these two Chapters for the whole-hearted manner in 
which they came to the assistance of the new Chapter. 
Twenty-two Companions travelled 150 miles, and 
spent two days on the trip in order that "Northern 
Lights" Chapter should receive a proper start. This 
is a tribute worthy the best traditions of the Royal 
Craft in New Ontario. 

Pembroke Chapter, No. 58, Mattawa. — Accom- 
panied by R. Ex. Comp. C. W. Haentschel, I visited 



140 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

this Chapter on March 18th. There was no degree 
work done, but three petitions were received, the first 
in over a year. Pembroke Chapter had just recently 
suffered a severe loss by the death of Ex. Comp. G. S. 
Richardson, First Principal. This sad event, coupled 
with a severe outbreak of Influenza in the town, was 
responsible for the Chapter being closed for the winter. 
This Chapter is in splendid shape financially, but is in 
need of a revival of interest if it is to keep pace with 
the other Chapters in the District. 

Tuscan Chapter, No. 95, Sudbury. — I paid my 
official visit to this Chapter on January 23rd, and 
found Ex. Comp. W. McDonald, First Principal, an 
enthusiastic worker, who has with him a set of officers 
whose interest in the work augurs well for Tuscan's 
future. The Mark Master Mason degree was con- 
ferred in a very creditable manner. 

Algonquin Chapter, No. 102, Sault Ste. Marie. 
■ — This the largest Chapter in the District, was visited 
by me on January 24th. The reception accorded me 
was one that I will ever remember with pleasure. 
There were over 100 Companions present, including 
about 35 from the Michigan " Soo." The Mark Master 
Mason degree was conferred in a faultless manner, 
and Ex. Comp. Johnston is to be congratulated 
on the quality of the work, and the excellence of 
the entertainment, which followed. The Chapter 
is in splendid shape and has a brilliant future. 

St. John's Chapter, No. 103, North Bay. — I 
visited this Chapter on February 6th, Ex. Comp. F. H. 
Todd accompanying me. I found Ex. Comp. Harry 
Thorpe and his officers most enthusiastic and efficient. 
The Most Excellent Master degree was worked in a 
manner that reflects great credit on the Chapter, and 
it is regrettable that the Companions do not appear 
to support the officers by a more regular attendance, 
but I have no doubt the efforts of this year's officers 
will meet with the success they merit. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 141 

Temiskaming Chapter, No. 169, New Liskeard. — 
This Chapter was visited by me on March 5th. It is a 
pleasure to visit Temiskaming Chapter with its splendid 
array of Past Principals, whose interest keeps pace 
with the healthy progress of the Chapter. On this 
occasion all three degrees were conferred in the efficient 
manner that is characteristic of the Companions in 
New Liskeard. This is a busy Chapter with a bright 
future. 

Cobalt Chapter, No. 203, Cobalt. — I visited this 
Chapter on February 18th, and was agreeably surprised 
at the interest and efficiency displayed, in view of the 
fact, that the epidemic of Influenza had been the cause 
of the Chapter remaining closed for some months, and 
had caused the death of two of its most valued officers ; 
these were Comps. Thos. McCauley, Scribe E. and N. 
M. Creyk, Auditor. Their loss is keenly felt as both 
were enthusiastic workers. The work of the evening, 
the Mark Master Mason degree, was conferred in the 
impressive manner that has always obtained in this 
splendid young Chapter. The officers are displaying an 
interest in the work that warrants the belief that a 
bright future is in store for Cobalt, No. 203. 

Northern Lights Chapter, U.D., Timmins. — The 
"Baby" Chapter of the District, I visited on February 
19th, and if the quality of the work done on that 
occasion is any criterion, the older Chapters will have 
to look to their laurels. The Mark Master Mason 
degree constituted the work of the evening, and was 
conferred in a very able manner. In view of the 
large field from which to draw members, the 
splendid Chapter room and paraphernalia, and 
the ability and interest displayed by the officers, 
I have no hesitation in recommending that a 
Charter be granted at the next Convocation of 
Grand Chapter. It is with sincere regret that I have 
to record since my visit, the death of Ex. Comp. D. 
Hoggarth, Third Principal of this Chapter. 

In closing, I wish to thank the Companions of the 
District, for the honor conferred upon me, in electing 



142 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

me to the office of Grand Superintendent, also the 
Scribes E. for their uniform promptness and courtesy, 
and to all, who by their help and kindness have made 
my term of office one that is replete with recollections 
I shall always cherish. 

Fraternally submitted, 

Robt. LeHeup, 
Grand Supt., New Ontario District, No. 23. 

Haileybury, Ont. 



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144 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



KLONDIKE CHAPTER, No. 154. (Unattached). 

To the Most Excellent, the Grand Z., Principals and 
Officers of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada. 

Most Excellent Sir and Companions : 

I have the honor to submit for your consideration 
the following report on the condition of Royal Arch 
Masonry in this District for the year 1918. 

I regret to state, that, generally speaking, conditions 
in this District are not as good as when I made my last 
report. The purchasing power of gold, our only pro- 
duct, has decreased fully fifty per cent, in the past few 
years, owing to the continued advance in the cost of 
mining supplies and equipment. Because of this 
condition, and the high wages paid elsewhere, a very 
large number has left the Territory during the past 
year, all of which, directly and indirectly, detracts 
from the prosperity of Capitular Masonry in our 
District. 

In addition to the large number of our members 
who moved away from Dawson the past summer, 
three of our most enthusiastic Companions went down 
with the ill-fated Princess Sophia in the appalling 
disaster of October 25th last. 

At the November Convocation, a staff of competent 
officers was elected, officers thoroughly acquainted with 
every phase of the work. A spirit of harmony prevails, 
leaving but very little for the Acting Grand Superin- 
tendent to do. 

Thanking you for the honor of representing the 
Grand Chapter in this District for the past year. 

Fraternally submitted, 

A. J. Gillis, 
Acting Grand Supt., Yukon District. 
Dawson, Y.T. 



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146 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton, 
seconded by M. Ex. Comp. W. S. R. Murch, and 

Resolved, — That the reports of the Grand Superintendents of 
Districts be referred to the Committee on the Condition of Capitular 
Masonry, to report later at this Convocation. 

COMMUNICATIONS. 

Letters were read, regretting inability to be present, 
from M. Ex. Comp. D. F. Macwatt, Sarnia, Grand 
Representative of the Grand Chapter of Scotland, near 
the Grand Chapter of Canada ; R. Ex. Comps. Ben- 
jamin Allen, Grand Representative of the Grand Chap- 
ter of Maine, near the Grand Chapter of Canada ; 
H. S. Griffin, Grand J., and Grand Representative of 
the Grand Chapter of Pennsylvania, near the Grand 
Chapter of Canada ; F. B. Gregory, Grand Represen- 
tative of the Grand Chapter of South Carolina, near 
the Grand Chapter of Canada ; G. E. Parkes, Past 
Grand Superintendent of Niagara District, No. 7. 

GRAND CHAPTER OF BRITISH COLUMBIA 

A Communication, dated Vancouver, B.C., April 
26th, 1919, addressed to the Grand Scribe E., from 
M. Ex. Comp. H. H. Watson, was read, in which it 
was stated : 

"I beg to enclose petitions signed by twelve of the seventeen 
Chapters in the Province of British Columbia, asking for approval 
and recognition of a Grand Chapter for the aforesaid Province. 
Will you please present these petitions to the Grand Chapter of Canada 
at the meeting to be held next month at Winnipeg. 

"The Companions of British Columbia seem to be fairly un- 
animous in the matter, so far every Chapter we have heard from is 
in favor of it. The Chapters at Fernie and at Cumberland are not 
in very good shape and are not holding meetings at the present 
time. We will probably hear from Grand Forks, Nelson and 
Cranbrook in time to have their names added to the petitions, but 
we felt that we should not delay longer in forwarding the petitions 
as the time is getting short. 

"At this writing I am not able to say whether we will have a 
representative from B.C. at your meeting, or not, but we will do 
our best. If there is anything we should do, that we have not 
done, I would appreciate it very much if you would advise me, as 
we are extremely anxious that everything should be ship-shape. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 147 

If it happens that we have no representative at the meeting, will 
you please advise me, by wire, of the action the Grand Chapter 
takes, as we will only have a very short time to arrange for a meeting 
at the same time as our Grand Lodge meets." 

Another letter, dated Vancouver, B.C., May 8th, 
1919, from M. Ex. Comp. H. H. Watson, was also 
read : 

"Many thanks for your favor acknowledging receipt of peti- 
tions from twelve B.C. Chapters. I now enclose another from 
Rocky Mountain Chapter, No. 125, Cranbrook. 

Nelson Chapter, No. 123, did not sign the petition, but sends 
in the following resolution : 

" 'Resolved, That, in the opinion of Nelson Chapter, No. 
123, steps should be taken by the Chapters in British Columbia 
to unite with the Royal Arch Masons in Alberta and form one 
Grand Chapter for Alberta and British Columbia.' 
"I have not received any reply yet from Boundary Chapter at 
Grand Forks. If it comes along I will forward it at once." 

Following was the form of Petition presented : 

" To the Most Excellent The Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of 
Canada : 
"The undersigned, being a regular Chapter under The Grand 
Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Canada, having well considered 
the proposal of forming a Grand Chapter for the Province of British 
Columbia, being firm in the belief that such Grand Chapter will 
result in deeper interest being taken in Capitular Masonry in the 
aforesaid Province, and having the prosperity of the Royal Craft 
at heart, humbly petition The Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada for approval and recognition of a Grand Chapter in the 
Province of British Columbia." 

The Petitions were signed by the First Principals 
and Scribes E., as well as Seals attached of the Chap- 
ters set forth : 

No. Name Place 

98 — Vancouver Vancouver. 

120— Kootenay Kaslo. 

122 — Rossland Rossland. 

124 — Westminster New Westminster. 

125 — Rocky Mountain. . . .Cranbrook. 

127 — Keystone Nanaimo. 

128 — Revelstoke Revelstoke. 

157 — Okanagan .Vernon. 

1 78 — Kaien Prince Rupert. 

182 — Camosun Victoria. 

190 — Pacific Vancouver. 

191 — North Vancouver. . .North Vancouver. 
206 — Kelowna Kelowna. 



148 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

The Communications of M. Ex. Comp. H. H. 
Watson and the Petitions from the several Chapters, 
in British Columbia, were, on motion of R. Ex. Comp. 
W. N. Ponton, seconded by M. Ex. Comp. W. S. R. 
Murch, referred to a special Committee for report. 



Formation of a Grand Chapter for British 
Columbia Approved 

"The Sub- Committee appointed by the Executive Committee 
of this Grand Chapter, to consider the Petitions from the Com- 
panions of British Columbia, for the formation of a Grand Chapter, 

"Desire to express the high esteem in which the Companions 
of British Columbia are held by this Grand Chapter, and deeply 
regret the severance of our beloved Companions from the Mother 
Chapter. 

"Yet, as the Grand Chapter of Canada has placed on record 
their willingness to co-operate with the Companions of the various 
Provinces in the promotion of the Royal Craft, join with our Most 
Excellent the Grand Z. in wishing them every success in their 
endeavors, and also rejoice in their ability and strength in forming 
a Grand Chapter of the Holy Royal Arch. Therefore, we recom- 
mend that the prayer of the Petitioners be granted. 

"Further we recommend that the sum of One Thousand 
Dollars be paid to the said Grand Chapter of British Columbia, 
p ayable in two instalments of Five Hundred Dollars each, the first 
on 1st August, 1919, and the second on 1st January, 1920." 

Respectfully submitted. 

A. Shaw, Chairman. 
W. S. R. Murch. 
W. G. Reid. 
George Moore. 

It was moved by M. Ex. Comp. A. Shaw, seconded 
by M. Ex. Comp. George Moore, and 

Resolved, — That the report of the Special Committee on the 
request of the Chapters in British Columbia, to form a Grand 
Chapter in that Province, be acceded to by this Grand Body, and 
that our Grand Scribe E. telegraph M. Ex. Comp. H. H. Watson 
to this effect, and wishing him God-speed. 

This resolution, upon being submitted to Grand 
Chapter, was unanimously adopted. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 149 

COPIES OF TELEGRAMS SENT AND RECEIVED 

Toronto, June 17th, 1919. 
H. H. Watson, Esq., 

Masonic Temple, 

Seymour and Georgia Sts., 
Vancouver, B.C. 

As requested, am pleased to notify you that Grand Chapter 
of Canada, to-day in Annual Convocation, unanimously approved 
of the formation of a Grand Chapter for British Columbia. Wish- 
ing you God-speed. Writing particulars. 

Henry T. Smith, 

Grand Scribe E. 



Vancouver, B.C., June 18th, 1919. 
Henry T. Smith, Esq., 
Grand Scribe E., 

Masonic Temple, 

Toronto, Ont. 

Many thanks for kind Telegram and approval of Grand Chapter 
of Canada and good wishes. Grand Chapter British Columbia 
formed to-day and officers installed. H. H. Watson, Grand Z.; 
M. H. Morrison, Prince Rupert, Grand H.; C. F. Sherwin, Kaslo, 
Grand J. ; J. W. Prescott, Grand Scribe E* Writing particulars. 

J. W. Prescott, 

Grand Scribe E. 



REPORT OF THE GRAND SCRIBE E. 

To the Most Excellent the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Companions, — The past year has been an exceed- 
ingly prosperous one for Capitular Masonry in this 
Jurisdiction, notwithstanding the unsettled conditions 
which have prevailed, and all indications for the 
coming year are bright, now that the Great European 
conflict has ended so happily for Canada and the 
British Empire. 

The epidemic of influenza, that was prevalent 
throughout Canada, in the fall and winter just passed, 
caused considerable unrest among the Chapters. 



150 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Many deaths of prominent Officers resulted from 
the epidemic. It is estimated that the deaths 
throughout the world from the epidemic have been 
over eight millions of people, and the Royal Craft 
in this jurisdiction keenly felt its effect by the death 
toll of the members. 

In the office of the Grand Scribe E., the corre- 
spondence during the past year has been exceedingly 
heavy. This could be lightened if the Scribes E. of 
the Chapters would show a little more consideration 
in replying to communications sent them, and in having 
their Annual Returns, when due, promptly in the 
hands of the Grand Scribe E. 

This year's proceedings will contain, as last year, 
the Honor Roll, and it will be found to have nearly 
fourteen hundred names of Companions. Some of 
them have paid the "Supreme Sacrifice." We should 
remember "A Nation is worthless that will not venture 
all for its Honor," and our brave Companions who 
have passed away, while discharging a duty to their 
Country, should not be forgotten by us, for they are 
deserving of our honor. 

Grand Chapter, at its last Annual Convocation, 
donated to the Canadian Red Cross Society $1,000.00. 
The President of the Toronto Branch, R. Ex. Comp. 
K. J. Dunstan, to whom this and other donations had 
been sent, in one of his communications to the Grand 
Scribe E., said, "When passing through the Duchess of 
Connaught Canadian Red Cross Hospital at Cliveden, 
England, he noticed ten tablets on beds, showing they 
had been given by the Grand Chapter of Canada. 
There may have been more in other wards." This in- 
formation must undoubtedly be gratifying to the 
members of Grand Chapter, in knowing how their 
donations had been acted upon. 

Crow's Nest Chapter, No. 137, Fernie, B.C., was 
referred to in last year's report as having voluntarily 
surrendered its Warrant and books. Early in the 
year the Grand Superintendent of Kootenay District, 
No. 18, forwarded to the office of the Grand Scribe E. 
the Warrant, Seal and Books of this Chapter. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 151 

Cyrus Chapter, No. 142, Cumberland, B.C., is the 
only Chapter to be reported as a delinquent. In May, 
1918, a communication was received from the Scribe E., 
saying that he was unable to hold Convocations of the 
Chapter, owing to the members not attending. Now 
that the war is over, it may be possible for an energetic 
Companion to revive an interest in the Chapter. 

Eighty-nine Dispensations have been issued during 
the year. Many of these were for qualifying Com- 
panions, elected to fill positions of Z.'s and H.'s, chang- 
ing dates of Convocations, due largely to the closing of 
all meetings of Societies by the Health Boards, through- 
out the Country, owing to the epidemic of influenza, 
and a few for holding "At Homes" and wearing Royal 
Arch regalia. 

The membership of Grand Chapter, December 31st, 
1917, was 19,601, with 165 Chapters. During the year 
ending December 31st, 1918, the registrations, joinings 
and restorations have been 1,852 ; the withdrawals, 
suspensions and deaths, 1,049, leaving a net gain of 
803, and making a total membership of 20,404, with 
165 Chapters. There were two new Chapters in- 
stituted, but as Crow's Nest, No. 137, Fernie, B.C., 
became dormant, and Kether, No. 177, Pincher Creek, 
Alta., joined the Grand Chapter of Alberta, this leaves 
the same number of Chapters as the previous year. 
The increase in membership is a most creditable one, 
when the prevalent conditions, during the past year, 
are taken into consideration. 

From the Annual Statement attached, it will be 
seen that, in fees and dues from the different Chapters, 
there has been received $14,548.35. The items making 
up this amount, with the disbursements, are fully set 
forth in the Reports of the Treasurer and the Audit 
and Finance Committee. 

Certificates of Good Standing 

Companions residing in the Province of Alberta, 
desiring certificates of Good Standing, on account of 
their respective Chapters having surrendered their 
warrants to the Grand Chapter of Canada, and the 



152 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Grand Scribe E., being authorized by resolution, 
adopted at the Annual Convocation, February 28th, 
1917, to grant such certificates, on being satisfied that 
the Companions were in good standing on the records 
of Grand Chapter, certificates were issued as follows : 

Roy K. Lillie, Otuskwan, No. 179, G.R.C., Calgary. 

John Scott, Otuskwan, No. 179, G.R.C., Calgary. 

Thomas McMurray Turnbull, North Star, No. 118, 
G.R.C., Edmonton. 

Certificates of Good Standing were also, by author- 
ity, issued to : 

W. L. Roberts, who was a member of Seymore, 
No. 38, G.R.C., Shelburne, Ont., which Chapter be- 
came dormant many years ago, for the purpose of 
affiliating with Mount Horeb, No. 20, G.R.C., Brant- 
ford, Ont., and to : 

Joseph Austin, a member of Crow's Nest, No. 137, 
G.R.C., Fernie, B.C., a Chapter which became dormant 
January 29th, 1918. 

Warrants Cancelled and Returned to Alberta 
Chapters 

In the adjustment of the "Alberta Difficulty," in 
the year 1917, the Warrants and Seals of the Chapters, 
severing their connection with the Grand Chapter of 
Canada, were to be forwarded to the office of the Grand 
Scribe E. and, at the request of an Alberta Chapter, 
the Warrant of that Chapter, after being duly can- 
celled, could be returned : 

Alberta, No. 106, G.R.C., Calgary. Warrant 
marked cancelled and returned. 

Calgary, No. 189, G.R.C., Calgary. Warrant 
marked cancelled and returned. 

Keystone, No. 196, G.R.C., Red Deer. Warrant 
marked cancelled and returned. 

Active Chapters 

The Chapters reporting, during the year, 15 or 
more exaltations, are as follows : 

The St. Patrick, No. 145, Toronto, 133 ; Battleford, 
No. 181, Battleford, 75 ; Antiquity, No. 91, Toronto, 
47 ; Saskatoon, No. 165, Saskatoon, 46 ; Shekinah, 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 153 

No. 138, Toronto, 42 ; Ark, No. 80, Windsor, 41 ; 
Anct. Frontenac and Cataraqui, No. 1, Kingston, and 
Occident, No. 77, Toronto, 39 each ; St. John's, No. 6, 
Hamilton, 38 ; The Hiram, No. 2, Hamilton, 37 ; 
Mount Sinai, U.D., Toronto, 35 ; King Solomon's, 
No. 8, Toronto, 33 ; Toronto, No. 185, Toronto, 32 ; 
Mount Horeb, No. 20, Brantford, 30 ; Shuniah, No. 82, 
Port Arthur, 28 ; Vancouver, No. 98, Vancouver, 25 ; 
Mt. Moriah, No. 19, St. Catharines, and Orient, No. 
79, Toronto, 24 each ; Algonquin, No. 102, Sault Ste. 
Marie, 20 ; St. Andrew and St. John, No. 4, Toronto, 
Fort William, No. 140, Fort William, and Northern 
Lights, U.D., Timmins, 19 each ; St. George's, No. 5, 
London, Victoria, No. 37, Port Hope, and Prince 
Rupert, No. 52, Winnipeg, 18 each ; The Moira, No. 7, 
Belleville, 17 ; Govan, No. 193, Govan, 16 ; Grimsby, 
No. 69, Grimsby, 15. 

New Chapters 
The authorized warrant, after the last Annual Con- 
vocation, was engrossed and forwarded to the proper 
officer for the following Chapter : Shaunavon, No. 211, 
Shaunavon, Saskatchewan. 

Chapters under Dispensation 
Mount Sinai Chapter, Toronto, Ont., received its 
Dispensation and was instituted with 29 petitioners. 
It now has a membership of 65. It was continued 
under Dispensation last year, owing to it having been 
instituted a few days before the Annual Convocation 
of Grand Chapter, and it now asks for its warrant. 

In addition to the foregoing, the following Chapters 
were regularly instituted on the dates given : 

The Northern Lights, Timmins, Ont. — Instituted 
July 24th, 1918. Petitioners, twenty : David Alex- 
ander Hoggarth, Dayton Ostrosser, William Henry 
Peters, Charles Gunning Williams, Cecil Nicholson 
Towell, John W. Fogg, Joseph Samuel Amm, George 
Verral Fulton, James E. Boyle, Charles Milton Carr, 
Hugh Boyle, No. 169; Reginald J. Jemmett, William 
John Kerr, Albert Levi Joyner, Charles Gordon 



154 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Kemsley, William Whitfield White, No. 203 ; William 
McCracken, No. 103 ; Maxwell Smith, No. 95 ; 
G.R.C.; Charles Humphrey, No. 58, G.R.N. Y.; 
James K. Moore, No. 264, G.R.S. 

Vimy, Inwood, Ont. — Instituted March 17th, 1919. 
Petitions, seventeen : Neil A. Campbell, William R. 
Dawson, James Brown, Clark Phillip Freeman, Foster 
Wellington Smith, Johnston Vance, John William 
Johnston, Arthur Ernest Loosemore, William English, 
J. H. Morrison, William John Bourne, Mark Burford, 
Robert Luke, No. 53 : Charles Noel Sarney, No. 44 ; 
Percy H. Streeter, No. 47 ; H. A. Gilroy, No. 80 ; 
Arthur Ernest Johnston, No. 186, G.R.C. 

By-laws 

By-laws have been presented to the M. Ex. the 
Grand Z., and approved for the following Chapters : 

Keystone, No. 35 ; Enterprise, No. 67 ; Tuscan, 
No. 95 ; King Cyrus, No. 119 ; St. Andrew's, No. 139 ; 
The St. Patrick, No. 145 ; Alberton, No. 152 ; The 
Beaches, No. 163. 

Amendments to by-laws of Chapters have also been 
submitted and approved as follows : 

St. George's, No. 5 ; King Solomon's, No. 8 ; 
Prince Edward, No. 31 ; Waterloo, No. 32 ; Signet, 
No. 34 ; Harris, No. 41 ; Palestine, No. 54 ; York, 
No. 62 ; St. Paul's, No. 65 ; Grand River, No. 70 ; 
Occident, No. 77 ; Shuniah, No. 82 ; Tuscan, No. 95 ; 
Algonquin, No. 102 ; Wardworth, No. 110,; Maple, 
No. 116 ; King Cyrus, No. 119 ; St. Francis, No. 133 ; 
Succoth, No. 135 ; Presque Isle, No. 144 ; The St. 
Patrick, No. 145 ; Klondike, No. 154 ; The Beaches, 
No. 163 ; Kaien, No. 178 ; Toronto, No. 185. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 



155 



ANNUAL STATEMENT 

Year 1st February, 1918, to 31st January, 1919. 

FEES AND DUES FROM CHAPTERS. 



1 Anct. Frontenac 

andCataraqui. $ 188 00 

2 The Hiram. . : . . . 285 50 

3 St. John's 225 35 

4 St. Andrew and 

St. John 169 50 

5 St. George's 209 00 

6 St. John's 296 60 

7 TheMoira 145 00 

8 King Solomon's.. 242 15 

15 Wawanosh 3 00 

16 Carleton 308 95 

18 Oxford 48 65 

19 Mount Moriah. . . 164 50 

20 Mount Horeb 172 35 

22 Grenville 80 50 

23 Ezra 106 35 

24 Tecumseh 110 00 

26 St. Mark's 98 50 

27 Manitou 122 60 

28 Pentalpha 85 90 

29 McCallum 49 20 

30 Huron 60 00 

31 Prince Edward. . . 90 50 

32 Waterloo 105 50 

34 Signet 151 80 

35 Keystone 101 00 

36 Corinthian 107 45 

37 Victoria 105 50 

40 Guelph 69 35 

41 Harris 47 50 

44 Mount Sinai 41 00 

45 Excelsior 47 70 

46 St. James 55 50 

47 Wellington 142 55 

48 St. John's 33 40 

52 Prince Rupert ... 240 50 

53 Bruce 59 50 

54 Palestine 153 75 

55 Niagara 45 50 

56 Georgian 77 00 

57 King Hiram 36 50 

58 Pembroke 17 50 

59 Sussex 92 60 

60 Doric 43 50 

61 Granite 38 05 



62 York $ 85 25 

63 Havelock 54 50 

64 Willson 84 50 

65 St. Paul's 78 80 

66 The Malloch 63 75 

67 Enterprise 89 50 

68 Maitland 18 50 

69 Grimsby 58 55 

70 Grand River .... 24 80 

71 Prince of Wales. . 43 75 

72 Keystone 65 80 

73 Erie 4 00 

74 Beaver 38 85 

75 St. Clair 37 50 

76 Mount Nebo 128 85 

77 Occident 341 75 

78 Minnewawa 30 50 

79 Orient 136 00 

80 Ark 274 70 

81 Aylmer 69 00 

82 Shuniah 179 00 

83 Ionic 62 80 

84 Lebanon 57 50 

88 MacNabb 41 00 

90 Golden 93 50 

91 Antiquity 283 40 

94 Midland 113 50 

95 Tuscan 108 55 

98 Vancouver 175 25 

100 St. Lawrence 60 50 

101 Corinthian 98 65 

102 Algonquin 249 50 

103 St. John's 63 50 

104 White Oak 38 75 

110 Warkworth 38 90 

112 St. John's 52 50 

113 Covenant 55 50 

114 Bonnechere 73 50 

115 Brant 46 00 

116 Maple 61 80 

117 Kitchener 67 75 

119 King Cyrus 108 00 

121 Wascana 151 60 

122 Rossland 57 40 

123 Nelson 47 50 

124 Westminster 96 20 



156 



GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



125 Rocky Mountain. $ 31 10 

127 Keystone 66 50 

128 Revelstoke 7 25 

129 Elliot 29 50 

131 Amabel 19 50 

132 Leeds 74 50 

133 St. Francis 56 50 

134 King Darius 20 20 

135 Succoth 83 00 

136 King Edward.... 109 10 

138 Shekinah 198 00 

139 St. Andrew's 70 85 

140 Fort William 157 00 

141 Keystone 42 35 

142 Cyrus 21 50 

143 Glengarry 25 50 

144 Presqu' Isle 8 00 

145 The St. Patrick's. 586 35 

146 Bernard 36 50 

148 St. John's 15 

149 Atwood 57 20 

150 London 119 50 

151 Laurentian 47 80 

152 Alberton 38 50 

153 Sombra 58 85 

154 Klondike 9 25 

155 Ancaster 53 50 

156 Avondale. ...'... 77 50 

157 Okanagan 37 50 

160 Prince Albert. ... 56 10 

161 Madoc 58 20 

162 Moose Jaw 152 50 

163 The Beaches 53 50 

164 Lome 35 00 

165 Saskatoon 269 65 

166 Moose Mountain. 42 60 

167 Kichikewana 66 90 



168 Ionic $ 62 00 

169 Temiskaming. ... 96 00 
171 Rabboni 91 50 

173 Weyburn 92 50 

174 Boundary 21 50 

175 The Hamilton. .. 57 50 
178 Kaien 80 50 

180 Estevan 50 15 

181 Battleford 266 75 

182 Camosun 78 00 

183 Mount Sinai 2 25 

184 Hugh Murray .. . 22 75 

185 Toronto 173 50 

186 Unity 120 20 

187 Connaught 153 05 

190 Pacific 58 15 

191 North Vancouver 32 50 

192 Trinity 48 10 

193 Govan 83 00 

194 Orient 61 35 

195 Peel 26 90 

198 Couchiching 53 00 

203 Cobalt 98 60 

205 Victoria 24 50 

206 Kelowna 40 00 

207 King George 73 50 

208 Assiniboia 41 50 

209 Humboldt 62 70 

210 Kitchener 31 25 

211 Shaunavon 49 10 

u.d. Mount Sinai 107 00 

u.d. Northern Lights . 66 00 

u.d. Vimy 35 00 

Sundries 25 00 



$14,548 35 



Fraternally submitted, 

Henry T. Smith, 

Grand Scribe E. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 



157 



GRAND TREASURER'S STATEMENT OF ACCOUNT 
1st February, 1918, to 31st January, 1919 



Received by Grand 
Scribe "E" on Ac- 
count of Dues, 
Fees, etc., from 
Chapters $14,548 35 

Interest on Invest- 
ments 1,623 48 



$16,171 83 



Accounts Paid — 

Cheques and Cash. $ 8,502 83 

Halifax Relief Grant. 1,000 00 

Canadian Red Cross. 1,000 00 
Grand Chapter of 

Alberta 1,000 00 

Benevolent Grants . . 1,720 00 



$13,222 83 
Excess of Receipts 

over Payments. . . . *2,949 00 



$16,171 83 



INVESTMENT ACCOUNT. 



Investments, 31st 
Jan., 1918 : 
As per last Account $31,375 73 
Fourth War Loan, 
Bonds, 
S3.000.00, Cost. . . 2,966 10 
Fifth War Loan, 
Sy 2 % Bond s, 
S3,000.0^, Cost. .. 3,000 00 



S37.341 83 



Debentures Matured — 
Mercantile Trust 

Co., Ltd $ 3,000 00 

Toronto General 

Trust 2,000 00 



5,000 00 
Investments, 31st 
Jan., 1919, as per 
List 32,341 83 



$37,341 83 



31st January, 1918, Capital— 

At Canadian Bank of Commerce $ 6,803 50 

Incidentals Account, in hand 9 73 



$ 6,813 23 
Investments as per Schedule 31,375 73 



31st January, 1919, Capital— 

At Canadian Bank of Commerce $ 8,790 75 

Incidentals Account, in hand 5 38 



$38,188 96 



$ 8,796 13 
Investments, as per Schedule 32,341 83 



$41,137 96 
Capital Enhancement, as above *$2,949 00 



Geo. Moore, Bryan Pontifex, F.C.A., 

Grand Treasurer. Auditor. 



158 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

INVESTMENTS HELD, 31st JANUARY, 1919. 

$16,352 30 Cost of $17,000.00 Toronto Industrial Debentures, 

5 per cent. Interest, due 1st December, 1925. 
2,521 00 City of Stratford Debentures. Interest, 4 per cent. 

Due 1st January, 1927. 
2,659 75 Town of Oshawa, Interest, 4>£ per cent., $1,300.61, 

due 1st December, 1921 ; $1,359.14 due 1st 

December, 1922. 
1,191 56 Village of Weston, Interest 6%, $578.43 due 1st Oct., 

1920 ; $613.13 due 1st October, 1921. 
1,173 00 Cost of $1,200.00 Canadian War Loan (1st). Interest, 

5%. Due 1st December 1925. 
2,478 12 Cost of $2,500.00 Canadian War Loan (4th). Interest, 

5^%. Due 1st December, 1937. 
2,966 10 Cost of $3,000.00 Canadian War Loan (4th). Interest, 

5>^%. Due 1st December { 1937. 
3,000 00 Cost of $3,000.00 Canadian War Loan (5th). Interest, 

5#%. Due 1st November, 1933. 



$32,341 83— Total Cost. Face Value, $33,072.31. 

Geo. Moore, Bryan Pontifex, F.C.A., 

Grand Treasurer. Auditor. 

It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton, 
seconded by M. Ex. Comp. W. S. R. Murch, and 

Resolved, — That the statements of the Grand Scribe E., and 
Grand Treasurer for the year 1918, be received and referred to the 
Executive Committee for audit, and to report thereon at the present 
Convocation. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 



159 



Chapter N 



BENEVOLENCE. 

To the Most Excellent Grand Z. and Companions of the 
Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of Canada : 
The Committe on Benevolence have examined the 
applications for relief presented to them and respect- 
fully recommend that the following grants be made : 

. 1— Comp. E. H. B $ 60 00 

1— Daughter of S. D. F 30 00 

3— Widow of T. W 50 00 

3— Widow of J. J. H 50 00 

6— Widow of J. H 00 

8— Widow of D. C 130 00 

26— Widow of H. C. C 50 00 

28— Comp. C. W. S 100 00 

29— Comp. J. A 100 00 

30— Comp. R. R 80 00 

37— Widow of W. B. W 50 00 

37— Widow of R. M. J 40 00 

44— Widow of H. J. R 30 00 

52— Widow of J. O'C 80 00 

54— Widow of S. D 50 00 

54— Comp. J. A. S. 100 00 

59— Daughter of W. B. S 50 00 

62— Widow of W. D 50 00 

62— Widow of H. J. S 50 00 

72 -Widow of J. E. H 110 00 

76— Widow of R. H. W 

76— Widow of C. K 

77— Widow of W. P 

77— Widow of W. H. W 

145— Comp. W. J. K 

145— Widow of R. A. M 



50 00 


30 00 


50 00 


50 00 


100 00 


50 00 



$1,640 00 

We further recommend that the full amount of the 
grant to each recipient be paid, this year, in one cheque. 

Fraternally submitted on behalf of the Committee. 

A. Shaw, 

Chairman. 



160 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton, 
seconded by R. Ex. Comp. A. Shaw, and 

Resolved, — That the report of the Committee on Benevolence 
be received and adopted. 

WARRANTS 

To the Most Excellent the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Canada : 

Companions, — The Committee on Warrants beg to 
report as follows : 

Mount Sinai Chapter, Toronto, Ont., was instituted 
in the month of February, 1918, under favorable cir- 
cumstances, with a membership of twenty-nine, and it 
now has a membership of sixty-five. 

The Grand Superintendent reports that the Chapter 
has already taken its place among the older Chapters 
of Toronto, and compares favorably with them, and 
that it fills an important and needed place among the 
Chapters of District No. 8. The books, paraphernalia 
and the room in which the Chapter holds its Convoca- 
tions are all that can be desired. 

The Northern Lights, Timmins, Ont., was insti- 
tuted in the month of July, 1918, under excellent con- 
ditions, with a membership of twenty. It now has 
a membership of thirty-eight. 

The Grand Superintendent reports that the Chapter 
has a very large field from which to draw members, 
and that it has a splendid room in which to hold its 
Convocations and its paraphernalia is complete. The 
books of the Chapter are also in excellent shape. 

Vimy Chapter, Inwood, Ont., was instituted in 
March, 1919, with a membership of seventeen, and on 
the night of its opening received eleven Petitions for 
membership. 

The Grand Superintendent says the members are 
enthusiastic and that he looks for a good report from 
this Chapter next year. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 161 

Your Committee would therefore recommend that 
Warrants be granted to the following Chapters : 

Mount Sinai, No. 212, Toronto, Ont. 

The Northern Lights, No. 213, Timmins, Ont., and 

That Vimy Chapter, Inwood Ont., be continued 
under dispensation for the coming year. 

All of which is fraternally submitted, 

O. Ellwood, 
Chairman of Committee on Warrants. 

It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton, 
seconded by R. Ex. Comp. O. Ellwood, and 

Resolved, — That the report of the Executive Committee on 
Warrants be received and adopted. 



162 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

AUDIT AND FINANCE. 

To the Most Excellent the Grand Z. and the Grand Chapter 
of Royal Arch Masons of Canada : 

Companions, — On Audit and Finance, your Com- 
mittee submits the following statement of the Receipts 
and Disbursements for the past year, certified to by the 
Auditor, Bryan Pontifex, Chartered Accountant. 

SUMMARY CASH ACCOUNT, YEAR ENDED 
31st JANUARY, 1919. 

Balance, 31st January, 1918, as per last Ac- 
count, at Bank of Commerce $ 6,803 50 

Incidentals Account, Cash in hand 9 73 

$ 6,813 23 

Receipts from Chapters — 

Certificates $ 1,703 00 

Dues 10,112 20 

Fees 1,690 00 

Dispensations and Warrants 135 00 

Constitutions 665 75 

Sundries 242 40 

Investment Account — $14,548 35 

Bonds Paid off : 

Mercantile Trust $3,000 00 

Toronto General Trusts 2,000 00 

$ 5,000 00 

Interest received 1,623 48 

6,623 48 



$27,985 06 

Benevolence $ 1,720 00 

Halifax Relief Grant 1,000 00 

Canadian Red Cross 1,000 00 

$ 3,720 00 

Grand Chapter of Alberta 1,000 00 

Investment a/c War Loan Bonds Bought. . . . 5,966 10 

Salaries 2,962 51 

Superannuation 1,000 00 

Foreign Correspondence Report 200 00 

Ofhce Rent, Telephone, etc 637 95 

Premium on Guarantee Bond, etc 10 00 

Grand Chapter, Convocation Expenses 145 00 

Printing, Engrossing, etc., including "Pro- 
ceedings," $880.86, and Constitutions 

and the Work, $800.80 2,636 52 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 163 

Audit ami Financial Reports to 31st January, 

1918 150 00 

Grand "Z" Expenses 170 20 

Expenses of Grand Chapter Representatives. 185 55 

Funeral Wreath 10 00 

Office — New Typewriter, Furniture, etc 190 75 

$ 8,298 48 
Grafid Scribe "E," Office Incidentals, Postage, 

Express and General Expenses 204 35 

8,502 83 



$19,188 93 
Balance, 31st January, 1919 : 

At Canadian Bank of Commerce $ 8,790 75 

Incidentals Account, Balance in hand. ... 538 

8,796 13 



$27,985 06 



I have maintained a running audit during the year and' have 
examined the Books, Accounts and Vouchers of the Grand Chapter. 
I certify that I have found them in order and that the above is a 
correct summary of the Accounts. I also certify that I have verified 
the securities, the property of the Grand Chapter, and that they are 
of a total (cost) value of $32,341.83 and face value of $33,072.31. 

Bryan Pontifex, 
Toronto, 13th February, 1919. Chartered Accountant. 

Your Committee recommend the following appro- 
priations : 

Benevolence Grants $1640 00 

Foreign Correspondence Committee 200 00 

Incidentals— Advance, 1919 300 W 

Office Assistance 800 00 

Auditor's Fee, 1918. . . 200 00 

Catering, Grand Chapter 1 10 00 

Salary, Grand Scribe E 2,250 00 

Salary, Grand Treasurer 200 00 

Superannuation Allowance, G. J. Bennett 1,000 00 

New Desk, Chair and Filing Cabinet for G.S.E.'s office . . 140 00 

Your Committee notes with much pleasure that 
this Grand Chapter has been able to contribute out of 
its funds to Special Benevolence (i.e. grants to Halifax 
Relief and to the Canadian Red Cross Society) and also 
pay to the Grand Chapter of Alberta the sum of 
$1,000.00 as authorized at the last Annual Convocation, 



164 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

and this has been done without impairing our Resources 
in any way. 

And in addition our Capital Account has been 
further enhanced by investing $4,000.00 in Dominion 
War Bonds, thus enabling this Grand Chapter to earn 
as high a rate of interest as possible and enable it to 
take care of such contingencies as may arise from time 
to time in the future. 

All of this has been accomplished by a slight increase 
in dues, and a strict watch on all expenditures by our 
Grand Scribe E. 

Everything has been found in a highly satisfactory 
condition in connection with the office of the Grand 
Scribe E. and the Grand Treasurer. 

The matter of refunds presented to the Grand Scribe 
E. by several Companions, who had journeyed to 
Winnipeg to attend the Annual Convocation of Grand 
Chapter, that was to have been held there on the 21st 
and 22nd of May last, and which had to be postponed, 
owing to strike conditions in that City, were handed to 
your Committee for consideration and report. We beg 
to say, after due deliberation, we cannot recommend 
that any refund be made. 

Fraternally submitted, 

R. H. Spencer, 

Chairman. 
It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton, 
seconded by R. Ex. Comp. R. H. Spencer, and 

Resolved, — That the report of the Executive Committee on 
Audit and Finance be received and adopted. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 165 

CONDITION OF CAPITULAR MASONRY. 

To the Most Excellent the Grand Z., Officers and Com- 
panions of the Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons 
of Canada : 

Your Committee on the Condition of Capitular 
Masonry beg to present the Annual Report, based upon 
the returns furnished by twenty-three Grand Super- 
intendents, all of whom have shown commendable zeal 
and fidelity in the discharge of their onerous duties. 
There is no report from Yale-Columbia, No. 19. 

Grand Superintendents occupy a position of dignity 
and importance. The Grand First Principal can per- 
sonally visit only a percentage of the Chapters in a 
jurisdiction as widespread as that of the Grand Chapter 
of Canada, but his Representatives are expected to 
inspect every Chapter in their various Districts, so 
that, at least once each year, the condition of every 
Chapter, within the jurisdiction, will be brought under 
official review. It is their duty to examine into the 
material prosperity of each body, and to aid and assist 
in promoting their welfare. Especial care should be 
given to those which, for some reason, are not making 
satisfactory progress. In such cases the cause should 
be determined and if possible removed. 

The letter of Masonry is less important than the 
spirit, yet the work should be well done, and the author- 
ized form should be carefully preserved, but the spirit 
is essential and the Grand Superintendents' influence 
and personality can do much to promote and foster 
the best traditions of the Craft. 

Masonry is founded upon the fundamental princi- 
ples of brotherly love, relief and truth. There cannot 
have been, is not now, and never will be, a period when 
man has not or will not crave for the love and com- 
radeship of his fellow man. Throughout all time man 
will require counsel and assistance, as he meets the 
problems and difficulties of life, and there is no more 
precious possession than a friend upon whom he can 
rely. 



166 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

/'Buy the Truth and Sell it not" should be the 
guiding principle of a Mason's life. 

These fundamentals constitute the spirit of Mason- 
ry. The practice of these principles throughout its 
long history has created a tradition as powerful as it is 
beneficent. There is no other human agency which 
binds men together with a tie so close, lasting and un- 
selfish. Each finds in the other some one in whom he 
can confide and in whom he can safely trust. 

It is this essence and spirit of Masonry that Grand 
Superintendents should cultivate and promote to the 
utmost of their ability. This is their great responsi- 
bility. 

That the high office calls for men of character, per- 
sonality, ability and devotion is self-evident, and the 
duty falls upon the Companions of selecting those who 
best measure up to the requirements. This duty 
should not be discharged lightly, but with full apprecia- 
tion of personal responsibility. 

The great War is behind us, but many and complex 
problems lie before us. The best and bravest, the 
choicest spirits of our land have fought and died that we, 
and those who follow, may live under the form and 
character of government which we ourselves create. 
Masonic Government is essentially democratic. We 
make the laws by which we will be governed and then 
obey them. Every Lodge or Chapter by free ballot 
elects its ruler and then all render ready obedience. 
Again the representatives of each Chapter form the 
Grand Governing Body, and elect a Chief Executive, 
and to this Governing Body, and its supreme head, is 
rendered a full measure of obedience and respect. The 
system combines individual liberty and freedom of 
action with obedience to constituted authority. Hav- 
ing regard to the qualifications which alone give access 
to the Order, the nature of the institution and its 
teachings, there rests upon its members a peculiar 
responsibility. A perfect Mason should be an ideal 
citizen. The extent to which we discharge the duties 
of high citizenship will be the measure of our worthi- 
ness as Masons. Those who fought on Flanders Fields 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 167 

have made it possible for us to build up something 
better and nobler than before and we dare not, must 
not, fail. Again this is the spirit of Masonry, for this, 
in a broad sense, is brotherly love, relief and truth. 
When we have found the way to do these things without 
thought of self, but all for the common good, then 
indeed the genuine secrets will have been found and 
the brotherhood of man will be an accomplished fact. 
The Grand Chapter of Canada is playing its part. 
Its Membership has increased and its financial position 
is strong. The Grand Superintendents continue to 
report that the work is well done, and that the utmost 
harmony exists throughout the jurisdiction. In every 
Chapter there are loyal devoted and enthusiastic, 
Companions. There is a complete absence of friction 
and discord and in every case the Representative of 
the Grand First Principal received a warm and truly 
Masonic welcome. There are, however, two things 
which are unsatisfactory, viz., the small average at- 
tendance at Convocations and the large amount of 
outstanding dues. 

Incoming Grand Superintendents are earnestly 
asked to give these matters their careful attention. 
As one Grand Superintendent says, "A Member in 
arrears is a luke-warm Member at best." If his in- 
terest is maintained and he is a regular attendant, he 
will not fall behind. 

The following table is of interest : 

N umber of Chapters 165 

Average attendance of Members 18 

Average Membership 124 

Liabilities $ 7,~339 

Assets 180,560 

Outstanding Dues 30,550 

Amount of Insurance 53,800 

Expended on Benevolence 4,889 

It will be seen that while the average number of 
Members is 124, the average attendance is but 18. 
This is lamentably small. It is suggested that the 
Officers should make it a point to follow up each new 



168 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Companion ; show him that it was himself, not his 
money, that was wanted ; see that he attends the 
meetings, subsequent to obtaining his degrees ; enlist 
his active co-operation in the general work of the 
Chapter, and thus induce him to take such an interest 
in the institution that it will remain and strengthen as 
the years pass. 

Again, every attention should be shown the old 
Members and Past Principals, that both old and young 
may unite together in making Capitular Masonry a 
strong, active and living force. 

OFFICIAL VISITS 

Notwithstanding the influenza plague, and in some 
cases the barrier of distance, the Grand Superintendents 
visited practically every Chapter in the Jurisdiction. 
The new Grand Superintendent should note that Bruce 
Chapter, No. 53, Petrolea, is reported as holding very 
few meetings, and that one could not be arranged this 
year for an official visit. 

Incoming Superintendents should study the reports 
of their predecessors that they may be fully familiar 
with the condition of each Chapter in their respective 
districts, and be in a better position to assist actively 
and intelligently in their up-building and give especial 
thought and care to those whose past has not been 
entirely satisfactory. 

VISITS BY PAST GRAND CHAPTER OFFICERS 

The Grand Superintendent of Niagara District, 
No. 7, and of Hamilton District, No. 5, speak 
in high terms of the value of a visit by a party 
of Past Grand Chapter Officers, organized by Most 
Excellent Comp. George Moore. They consider such 
visits as of great benefit to Capitular Masonry and an 
inspiration to all present at the Convocations. 

CHAPTERS OF INSTRUCTION 

It is regretted that apparently there were but four 
Chapters of Instruction, viz., two in Toronto District, 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 169 

No. 8, one in St. Clair No. 1, and one in Guelph No. 4. 
If more were held they were not recorded in the reports. 

CHAPTER PROSPECTS 

It is satisfactory to note that only two Chapters 
are reported with prospects which were not good. 
Twenty-six are returned as fair and the remaining as 
good. 

MARK AND DEGREE BOOKS 

Former Committees have called attention to the 
absence of Mark and Degree Books. Two Grand 
Superintendents only mention the subject. The Grand 
Superintendent of Hamilton No. 5 reports that all 
Chapters in that District are properly supplied, and 
Keystone Chapter, No. 72, Sterling, is to be congratu- 
lated on setting a good example. It would appear, 
therefore, that little progress has been made and that 
it has been largely impossible to create interest or" 
awaken responsibility. This is unfortunate and re- 

• table. 

INSURANCE 

It is satisfactory to note that Chapters with few 
exceptions carry insurance. 

BENEVOLENCE 

The following table shows the amount expended on 
Benevolence by Grand Chapter and by Private Chap- 
ters for the past five years : 

Grand Private 

Chapter Chapters Total 

1914 SI, 600 00 $4,214 00 $5,814 00 

1915 1,880 00 6,400 00 8,280 00 

1916 1,830 00 5,579 35 7,409 35 

1917 1,705 00 4,670 86 6,375 86 

1918 1,810 00 5,048 13 6,858 13 

1919 1,640 00 4,889 00 6,529 00 

CHAPTER BOOKS 

There is almost a complete absence of any reference 
to Chapter Books. By inference we can conclude that 



170 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

they were in a satisfactory condition, as the reverse 
would have called for comment. It would, however, 
be more satisfactory to have the positive statements 
of Grand Superintendents that all books were properly 
kept and in good order. 

The Grand Superintendent of Saskatchewan North, 
No. 20, makes a most gratifying report on his District, 
which is flourishing from "fraternal, ritualistic and 
financial standpoints." 

A most commendable example of true Masonic 
spirit and of willingness to help was shown by Members 
of Cobalt, No. 203, and Temiskaming, No. 169, when 
twenty-two Companions travelled 150 miles to take 
part in the Institution of Northern Light, U.D., at 
Timmins. The Grand Superintendent properly says 
this action was in accordance with the best traditions 
of the Craft. 

The Grand Superintendent of Yukon District un- 
fortunately was compelled to report that the Klondyke 
Chapter, Dawson, is not nourishing. The general con- 
ditions of the Yukon are not good. The mining in- 
dustry has suffered and many persons have left. The 
Chapter also sustained heavy loss in the tragic death 
of three of the most enthusiastic Companions, who 
went down in the ill-fated "Princess Sophia" in the 
appalling disaster of October 25th last. Yet the 
Chapter held eight Convocations, has 114 Members 
and expended $32.50 on benevolence. 

The Grand Superintendent Toronto District, No. 8, 
recommends that a Committee be appointed to revise 
the instructions regarding the floor work. He calls 
attention to the "lamentable fact" that Companions, 
as a whole, do not take the degrees of Mark Master 
Mason or Most Excellent Master as seriously as the 
degree of the Royal Arch, and attributes this to 
the practice of conferring the two former on the 
same evening. He feels that if only one degree were 
permitted it would give added importance and solem- 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 171 

nity. The Grand Superintendent also considers that, 
in order to obtain continuity of effort, and maximum of 
efficiency, a new office should be created, viz., that of 
Deputy Grand Superintendent and that the occupant 
should visit Chapters with the Grand Superintendent, 
both that he may be thereby educating himself for his 
future responsibilities, and also that he may begin his 
duties as Grand Superintendent with a full knowledge 
of the standing and condition of each Chapter in the 
District. 



GRAND CHAPTER 

The following table shows the present standing : 

Number of Chapters, Warranted 163 

Number of Chapters, U.D 2 

165 

Number of Members, December 31st, 1917 19,601 

Number of Registrations, December 31st, 1918. 1,672 
Number of Joinings, December 31st, 1918. . . . . 122 
Number of Restorations, December 31st, 1918. 58 

1,852 

Number of Withdrawals, December 31st, 1918. 357 
Number of Suspensions, December 31st, 1918. . 375 
Number of Deaths, December 31st, 1918 317 

1,049 



Gain 803 



Total Membership, December 31st, 1918 20,404 

By Provinces Net Additions Net Removals 

British Columbia (including Y.T.).. 31 88 

Alberta — 32 

Saskatchewan 169 44 

Manitoba 32 13 

Ontario 897 149 

1,129 326 
Net Gain 803 



PRESENT MEMBERSHIP BY PROVINCES 

British Columbia (including Yukon Territory) 1,587 

Saskatchewan 1,882 



172 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Manitoba 1,277 

Ontario 15,658 

Total Membership, 31st December, 1918 20,404 

The financial position of Grand Chapter is reported 
as being satisfactory in every respect. The Treasurer 
continues to use good business judgment as to invest- 
ments. 

The Auditor reports that Grand Chapter is $3,000 
richer than a year ago, notwithstanding special grants 
of $2,000 to the Halifax Relief and Canadian Red Cross 
and $1,000 to the Grand Chapter of Alberta. 

Your Committee is of the opinion that, notwith- 
standing the War and the influenza, there is reason for 
congratulation upon the substantial progress made 
during the year. 

Fraternally submitted, 

K. J. Dunstan, 

Chairman. 

It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton, 
seconded by R. Ex. Comp. K. J. Dunstan, and 

Resolved, — That the report of the Committee on the Condition 
of Capitular Masonry be received and adopted. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 173 

GRAND Z'S ADDRESS 

To the Most Excellent the Grand First Principal and 
Companions of the Grand Chapter of Canada. 

Your Committee, to whom was referred the Most 
Excellent the Grand First Principal's address, respect- 
fully report as follows : 

The Committee regret the circumstances that have 
led to the holding of the Grand Chapter Convocation 
in Toronto. All had looked forward to the pleasure of 
receiving a Western Masonic welcome from our Winni- 
peg Companions. 

The Most Excellent the Grand First Principal ex- 
presses his great concern for the returned men, who 
have so nobly borne themselves in every branch of the 
service, showing how closely in touch he is with the 
service, in which he has been so busily engaged, and 
we quite agree with him, it is employment, as well as 
confidence in them, that is required. 

In drawing the attention of this Grand Body to be 
prepared for whatever demands made upon it, is 
timely, and we are fully in accord with him that 
Masonry is not a Charitable Society, but we become 
Masons to render ourselves more serviceable to our 
fellow man, that is, to render service, not to receive 
service. 

The reply of the Most Excellent the Grand First 
Principal to our beloved Companions of British Colum- 
bia must be gratifying to every member of this Grand 
Chapter. It shows how wise this Grand Body was in 
placing on record the resolution referred to by the 
Most Excellent the Grand First Principal. 

The Grand First Principal refers to the losses that 
sister Jurisdictions and our own grand Body have sus- 
tained by the death of distinguished Companions. 
The passing away of our late beloved M. Ex. Comp. 
John Ross Robertson is a great loss, not only to this 
Grand Chapter, but to every branch of Masonry, and 
wc know no more appropriate, or fitting, eulogy than 
that made by R. Ex. Comp. E. T. Malone, in pre- 
senting Bro. Robertson's Grand Lodge Regalia to the 



174 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

John Ross Robertson Lodge, of Toronto; on April 15th 
last : "He lived his life with forward face and un- 
reluctant soul, not hurrying to or turning from the 
goal. He did not hold back in fear from what the 
future veils, though his sudden going came as a great 
shock. He had so lived that the road's last turn was 
the best. We mourn him with true Masonic sorrow, 
reverencing his memory, endeavoring that he shall not 
have lived in vain. We can all work better because 
of his example and inspiration." 

The appointments of Grand Representatives, made, 
and approved, by the Grand First Principal, have been 
well chosen, and we note his loyalty to a Companion 
who has given faithful service to the Royal Craft in 
not accepting his proferred resignation ; may R. Ex. 
Comp. William Rea be long spared to fill the Office of 
Grand Representative of Alabama. 

Your Committee congratulate the Grand First 
Principal on his rulings, nine in number, out of nearly 
two hundred Chapters, with a membership of twenty 
thousand, which clearly shows how harmoniously they 
are working. 

The Most Excellent the Grand First Principal pays 
due credit to the Grand Superintendents of Districts 
and to the Grand Scribe E., which have been well 
merited. The Grand First Principal's remarks about 
himself we cannot concur in. He has lost the oppor- 
tunity of giving his personal impulse to the Chapters, 
the Royal Craft through the Chapters have lost his 
personal advice and instructions, but we know the 
Grand First Principal well. His path of duty was 
first to King, Empire and Canada, and he was placed 
in a position of trust. He gave in that position his 
whole service, thereby helping to win the great victory, 
the Empire and our Allies have won. 

Your Committee congratulate the Most Excellent 
the Grand First Principal in drawing attention to the 
fact that he has not incorporated in his address in- 
formation contained in other reports. 

The Most Excellent the Grand First Principal, in 
closing his splendid address, dwells on the problems of 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 175 

the future. They are in every citizen's mind and 
every Mason's heart. We must not forget, as Masons, 
that where the name of God is invoked, we trust no 
danger will ensue. It is the duty of every Mason to 
be careful to live up to the tenets and principles of 
the Royal Craft, to uphold the great liberties we enjoy, 
and to see that they are not taken from us by our own 
indifference. 

Your Committee are sure they express the feelings 
of every member of this Grand Chapter in congratu- 
lating the Grand First Principal on his service to this 
Grand Body and for the high example of duty he dis- 
played on all occasions. 



Fraternally submitted, 

W. S. R. Murcij, Chairman. 
George Moore. 
W. H. Davis. 

It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton, 
seconded by M. Ex. Comp. W. S. R. Murch, and 

Resolved, — That the report of the Committee on the Grand Z.'s 
address be received and adopted. 



Grand Superintendents 

Grand Chapter was then "called off" to enable the 
Districts to select their Grand Superintendents for the 
ensuing year. 

On Grand Chapter resuming labor, the following 
nominations were submitted to the M. Ex. the Grand 
Z., who was pleased to approve in each case, and the 
selections were confirmed : 



176 



GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



R. Ex. Comp. Ross Russell Fleury, Windsor, 

Ont St. Clair, Dist. No. 1 

A. M. Trick, London, Ont. . .London, 2 

M. E. Sherwood, Woodstock, 

Ont Wilson, " 3 

James D. Weir, Kitchener, 

Ont Wellington, " 4 

James Henry Bates, Dundas, 

Ont Hamilton, 5 

Leon G. Constable, St. 

Mary's, Ont Huron, 6 

Jas. A. Wray, Grimsby, 

Ont Niagara, 7 

Arthur L. Tinker, Toronto, 

Ont Toronto, " 8 

Clare LeRoy VanWyck, Owen 

Sound, Ont Georgian' 9 

David Fleming Robertson, 

Campbellford, Ont Ontario, 10 

James Oscar R. McCurdy, 

Belleville, Ont Prince Edw'd, " 11 

John A. Fleming, Prescott, 

Ont St. Lawrence, " 12 

Robert S. Simpson, Ottawa, 

Ont Ottawa, " 13 

T. J. Cherry, Keewatin, Ont. . Algoma, 14 

J. L. McKay, Neepawa, Man. Manitoba E. " 15 
C. H. Payne, Rivers, Man.. . Manitoba W. " 16 
Otto Waldemar Andreason, 

Humboldt, Sask Saskatch'n N. " 20 

George D. McMillian, Moose 

Jaw, Sask Saskatch'n W. " 21 

David Railton, Sintaluta, 

Sask Saskatch'n E. " 22 

Alexander Daniel Meldrum, 

Sudbury, Ont New Ontario, " 23 

A. J. Gillis, Dawson, Y.T. 

(Acting) Yukon Territory. 



Scrutineers of the Ballot 

The M. Ex. The Grand Z. appointed R. Ex. Comp. 
J. B. Nixon as Chairman, and the following Companions 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 177 

as Scrutineers of the Ballot : H. J. Milne, Kingston ; 
C. Wahlroth, Toronto ; F. S. Campbell, London ; 
C. F. Brooks, Toronto ; H. O. Holden, Kenora ; Ed. 
Lankin, Toronto ; R. C. Douglas, Welland ; G. H. 
Britton, Hamilton ; J. Herriot, Toronto. 

Election of Officers 

The election of the Grand Officers was then pro- 
ceeded with and resulted as follows : 



M.K 

R. 

R. 

M. 

R. 

R. 

R. 

R. 



x.Comp. W. N. Ponton, K.C., Belleville. .Grand Z. \ Grand 



H. S. Griffin, M.D., Hamilton . . .Grand H. [ Council 

R. H. Spencer, Trenton Grand J. j 

George Moore, Hamilton Grand Treasurer. 

Henry T. Smith, Toronto Grand Scribe E. 

W. J. Wadsworth, Toronto Grand Scribe N. 

T. F. Campbell, Gait Grand Prin. Soj'er. 

D. R. Gibson, Hamilton Grand Registrar. 

Hiram Pritchard, Toronto Grand Janitor. 

Executive Committee 

The following Companions were elected by Grand 
Chapter as members of the Executive Committee for 
the ensuing year : 

R. Ex. Comp. K. J. Dunstan Toronto 

O. Ellwood London 

A. Cowan Barrie 

J. McC. Potts, M.D vStirling 

C. W. Haentschel, M.D Haileybury 

Toronto Next Place of Meeting 

The Cities of St. Thomas and Toronto having been 
nominated for the next Annual Convocation in Febru- 
ary, 1920, and being put to the ballot, the result showed 
Toronto had received the highest number of votes, and 
that City was declared to be the choice of Grand Chap- 
ter. 

Historian Elected 

It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton, 
seconded by M. Ex. Comp. W. S. R. Murch, and 

Resolved, — That R. Ex. Comp. E. B. Brown, b3 the Historian 
of the Grand Chapter of Canada. 



178 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Foreign Correspondence 

The report on Foreign Correspondence was pre- 
sented by R. Ex. Comp. E. B. Brown, as well as a 
Supplementary Report on the application of the Su- 
preme Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Queensland for 
Fraternal Recognition by this Grand Body. 

In the report submitted it was stated : 

"Your Committee on Foreign Correspondence, having before 
it a letter from the Grand Scribe E. Elect of the Supreme Grand 
Royal Arch Chapter of Queensland, dated the 3rd October, 1918, 
addressed to the Grand Scribe E. of the Grand Chapter of Canada, 
announcing the formation and constitution of the said Grand 
Chapter of Queensland on the 9th July, 1918, and asking for fra- 
ternal recognition from this Grand Chapter, and having also before 
it a printed summary of the proceedings leading up to the formation 
of the said Queensland Grand Chapter, and a printed statement of 
the proceedings at the first meeting of the said Grand Chapter, 
held on the 31st October, 1918, beg to recommend that action of 
this Grand Chapter upon the request for recognition be deferred 
until further and fuller information shall have been obtained." 

It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton, 
seconded by R. Ex. Comp. E. B. Brown, and 

Resolved, — That the Report on Foreign Correspondence, as well 
as the Supplementary Report on the application for Fraternal Re- 
cognition, be received and adopted. 



Committee on Benevolence 

M. Ex. Comp. J. Ross Robertson, having died 
during the past year, on motion of R. Ex. Comp. 
W. N. Ponton, seconded by M. Ex. Comp. A. Shaw, 
it was resolved that M. Ex. Comp. F. W. Harcourt be 
elected to fill the position occupied by the late M. Ex. 
Comp. J. Ross Robertson. 

The following Companions compose the Committee 
on Benevolence and are members of the Executive 
Committee of Grand Chapter for their respective 
terms : 

R. Ex. Comp. J. B. Nixon, retires in 1920. 
M. " " Abraham Shaw, retires in 1921. 
M. " " F. W. Harcourt, retires in 1922. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 179 

Honorary Rank of P.G.Z. Conferred 

In compliance to Notice of Motion, it was moved 
by M. Ex. Comp. F. W. Harcourt, seconded by R. Ex. 
Comp. W. N. Ponton, and unanimously 

Resolved, — That for distinguished services rendered to Grand 
Chapter, the Honorary rank of a Past Grand Z. be conferred upon 
R. Ex. Comp. E. T. Malone. 

Amendment to Constitution 

It was moved by M. Ex. Comp. W. S. R. Murch, 
seconded by M. Ex. Comp. A. Shaw, and unanimously 

Resolved, — That the Constitution be amended by inserting, 
between Sections 275 and 276, page 70, of the Constitution (1918), 
the following Sections respecting the Sash to be worn by members 
of the Order in this Jurisdiction : 

>a — The Sash of the Order shall be of four-inch indented 
(crimson diamond outside), with silk fringe at the ends, 
and is to be worn over the left shoulder, passing obliquely 
to the right side. The sash of Principals and Past Z.'s of 
constituent Chapters shall have gold fringe or bullion in- 
stead of silk. 

i — The sash of present and past officers of the Grand Chap- 
ter shall be a tricolor ribbon of purple, crimson and pale 
blue, four inches wide, with gold fringe or bullion at the 
ends. 

Revision of Directions in "The Work" 

It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. R. J. Reade, 
seconded by R. Ex. Comp. W. S. Ormiston, and 

Resolved, — That a Committee be appointed to revise the 
Directions respecting the "Floor Work," as set forth in "The Work" 
of the Order, and to report at the next Annual Convocation of 
Grand Chapter. 

The Committee appointed were : M. Ex. Comps. 
W. S. R. Murch (Chairman), George Moore, A. Shaw, 
R. Ex. Comps. J. B. Nixon and R. J. Reade. 

Suitable Regalia for I. P.G.Z. 

It was moved by M. Ex. Comp. W. S. R. Murch, 
seconded by R. Ex. Comp. R. H. Spencer, and 

Resolved. — That a suitable Regalia be procured by Grand Chap- 
ter for the use of the Immediate Past Grand Z. 



180 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Proposed Testimonial 

It was moved by M. Ex. Comp. W. S. R. Murch, 
seconded by R. Ex. Comp. R. H. Spencer, and 

Resolved, — That the incoming M. Ex. Comp. the Grand Z. 
appoint a Committee to procure a suitable testimonial for the re- 
tiring Grand Z., in recognition of his devoted services during his 
term of office. 

The Committee subsequently appointed were : 
R. Ex. Comp. Francis B. Reilly {Chairman), M. Ex. 
Comps. F. W. Harcourt and W. S. R. Murch. 

Thanks Tendered Scrutineers 

It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. James McC. Potts, 
seconded by R. Ex. Comp. W. Y. Mills, and 

Resolved, — That the thanks of Grand Chapter be and are 
hereby tendered to the Ex. Companions who acted at the election 
of officers so efficiently as scrutineers of the ballot. 

Payment for Use of Rooms 

It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton, 
seconded by R. Ex. Comp. R. H. Spencer, and 

Resolved, — That the sum of $25.00 be paid to the Masonic 
Temple Corporation, Ltd., for the use of the rooms by this Grand 
Chapter at its Annual Convocation. 

Vote of Thanks to Masonic Temple Corporation 

It was moved by M. Ex. Comp. A. Shaw, seconded 
by M. Ex. Comp. F. W. Harcourt, and 

Resolved, — That the thanks of this Grand Chapter be accorded 
the Masonic Temple Corporation, Ltd., for the use of the rooms 
occupied by Grand Chapter during its Annual Sessions. 

Chapters Thanked for Fraternal Courtesies 

It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. W. S. Ormiston, 
seconded by M. Ex. Comp. W. S. R. Murch, and 

Resolved, — That the thanks of this Grand Body be tendered 
the Companions of the Toronto Chapters for their fraternal cour- 
tesies so generously extended to the officers and members of this 
Grand Chapter. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 181 

Paying Travelling Expenses of Executive Com- 
mittee 

M. Ex. Comp. A. S. Gorrell, before retiring from 
the chair as Grand Z., referred to the necessity of 
Grand Chapter now paying the travelling expenses of 
the members of the Executive Committee of Grand 
Chapter. 

It was moved by R. Ex. Comp. R. H. Spencer, 
seconded by M. Ex. Comp. W. S. R. Murch, that the 
incoming Grand Z. appoint a Committee to take into 
consideration the advisability of paying the travelling 
expenses of the Executive Committee attending the 
Convocation of Grand Chapter, and report at the next 
Annual Convocation of Grand Chapter. 

It was moved in amendment by M. Ex. Comp. A. 
Shaw, seconded by R. Ex. Comp. O. Ellwood, that 
Grand Chapter pay the transportation expenses of the 
members of the Executive Committee in attendance 
at Grand Chapter. 

The amendment and motion being submitted for 
adoption by Grand Chapter, the motion was declared 
to be carried almost unanimously. 



Officers Installed 

M. Ex. Comp. Abraham Shaw, assisted by R. Ex. 
Comp. W. Y. Mills, then proceeded with the Installa- 
tion and Investiture of the newly elected Officers of 
Grand Chapter (other than the Grand H. elect, who 
will be subsequently installed and invested), and were 
proclaimed and saluted according to ancient custom. 



Instructions to Grand Superintendents 

R. Ex. Comp. J. B. Nixon, at the close of the pro- 
ceedings of Grand Chapter, instructed the newly in- 
stalled Grand Superintendents in the secret work, and 
as to the duties of their Office. 



182 



GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



Appointments to Office 

The following appointments by the M. Ex. the 
Grand Z. were subsequently announced : 

R. Ex. Comp. R. J. Gibson Toronto 

" Geo. E. Parkes Dunnville 

W. S. Milne Toronto 

" J. H. Shaw Simcoe 

W. Y. Mills Kingston 



ASSISTANT OFFICERS 

R. Ex. Comp. J. B. Nixon, Toronto, Ont. . Grand Lecturer. 
V. " " Rev. W. E. H. Quartermain, 

Renfrew, Ont Grand Senior Sojourner. 

V. " " Donald McLeay, Battleford, 

Sask ; Grand Junior Sojourner. 

V. " " John E. Cameron, Toronto, 

Ont Grand Sword Bearer. 

V. " " Archibald D. Maclntyre, 

Ayr, Ont Grand Master 1st Veil. 

V. " " L. E. Bowerman, Toronto, 

Ont Grand Master 2nd Veil. 

V. " " Richard M. Trueman, 

Strathroy, Ont Grand Master 3rd Veil. 

V. " " S. Ward, Toronto, Ont Grand Master 4th Veil. 

V" " " John Henning, Melville, 

Sask Grand Standard Bearer. 

V. " " Frank H. Todd, Cobalt, 

Ont Grand D. of Ceremonies. 

V. " " Charles A. Herald, Hamil- 
ton, Ont Grand Organist. 

V. " " W. R. Ledger, Toronto, Ont. Grand Pursuivant. 
V. " " Cecil A. Blay, Hartney, 

Man Grand Steward. 

V. " " John M. Smith, Windsor, 

Ont Grand Steward. 

R. " " F. L. Newman, Portage la 

Prairie, Man Grand Steward. 

V. " " John Fisher Marr, Guelph, 

Ont Grand Steward. 

V. " " N. T. Owens, Port Arthur, 

Ont Grand Steward. 

V. " " William H. Johns, South- 
ampton, Ont Grand Steward. 

V. " " H. E. Boyle, Welland, Ont. . Grand Steward. 
V. " " W. A. Trench, Prescott, Ont. Grand Steward. 
V. " " Albert Groves Bright, Mea- 

ford, Ont Grand Steward. 

V. " ' Fred Wood, Campbellford, 

Ont Grand Steward. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 183 

The labors of the Convocation being ended, Grand 
Chapter was closed in Ample Form at 5.15 o'clock p.m. 





V.A^w^^^' 



Grand Scribe E. 



Toronto, June 17th, 1919. 



m GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

R. Ex. Comp. H. S. Griffin, M.D., Hamilton, Grand H., President 

BY VIRTUE OF OFFICE 

M. Ex. Comp. J. E. Harding Hamilton 

Michael Walsh Ingersoll 

William G. Reid Hamilton 

Abraham Shaw Kingston 

George Moore Hamilton 

F. W. Harcourt Toronto 

Daniel F. Macwatt Sarnia 

W. S. R. Murch Westport 

A. S. Gorrell, M.D Regina 

W. N. Ponton, Grand Z Belleville 

H. Robertson Collingwood 

E. T. Malone Toronto 

R. " " R. H. Spencer, Grand J Trenton 

GRAND SUPERINTENDENTS 

R. Ex. Comp. Ross Russell Fleury, Wind- 

Ont St. Clair Dist. No. 1 

A. M. Trick, London, Ont.. .London " 2 

" " M. E. Sherwood, Woodstock, 

Ont Wilson, " 3 

" James D. Weir, Kitchener, 

Ont Wellington, 4 

" " James Henry Bates, Dundas, 

Ont Hamilton, 5 

" " Leon G. Constable, St. 

Mary's, Ont Huron, 6 

" " Jas. A. Wray, Grimsby, 

Ont Niagara, " 7 

Arthur L. Tinker, Toronto, 

Ont Toronto, " 8 

Clare LeRoy VanWyck, 

Owen Sound, Ont Georgian, 9 

" " David Fleming Robertson, 

Campbellford, Ont Ontario, 10 

" " James Oscar R. McCurdy, 

Belleville, Ont Pr. Edward, " 11 

" " John A. Fleming, Prescott, 

Ont St. Lawrence, " 12 

" " Robert S. Simpson, Ottawa, 

Ont ..Ottawa, " 13 

" " T. J. Cherry, Keewatin, 

Ont Algoma, " 14 

" " J. L. McKay, Neepawa, 

Man Manitoba E., " 15 

C. H. Payne, Rivers, Man. .. Manitoba W., " 16 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 185 

R. Ex. Comp. Otto Waldemar Andreason, 

Humboldt, Sask Saskatch'n N., " 20 

George D. McMillian, Moose 

Jaw, Sask Saskatch'n W., " 21 

David Railton, Sintaluta, 

Sask Saskatch'n E., " 22 

" Alexander Daniel Meldrum, 

Sudbury, Ont New Ontario, " 23 

A. T. Gillis, Dawson, Y.T. 

(Acting) Yukon Territory. 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS 

R. Ex. Comp. Henry T. Smith, Toronto Grand Scribe E. 

W. J. Wadsworth, Toronto Grand Scribe N. 

ELECTED BY GRAND CHAPTER 

R. Ex. Comp. K. J. Dunstan Toronto 

O. Ellwood London 

A. Cowan Barrie 

" J. McC. Potts, M.D Stirling 

" C. W. Haentschel, M.D Haileybury 

APPOINTED BY GRAND 2. 

R. Ex. Comp. R. J. Gibson Toronto 

Geo. E. Parkes Dunnville 

" W. S. Milne Toronto 

J. H. Shaw Simcoe 

" W. Y. Mills Kingston 



SUB-COMMITTEES 

GRAND Z.'S ADDRESS 

M. Ex. Comps. A. S. Gorrell (Chairman), J. E. Harding, 
M. Walsh, W. G. Reid, A. Shaw, George Moore, F. W. Harcourt, 
D. F. Macwatt, W. S. R. Murch, H. Robertson, E. T. Malone. 

BENEVOLENCE 

M. Ex. Comps. A. Shaw (Chairman), F. W. Harcourt, R. Ex. 
Comp. J. B. Nixon. 

AUDIT AND FINANCE 

R. Ex. Comp. O. Ellwood (Chairman), M. Ex. Comp. W. S. R. 
Murch, R. Ex. Comps. G. E. Parkes, J. A. Fleming, A. D. Meldrum, 
R. R. Fleury, A. M. Trick, J. L. McKay, Geo. D. McMillian. 

GRIEVANCES AND APPEALS 

R. Ex. Comp. R. J. Gibson (Chairman), M. Ex. Comps. F. W. 
Harcourt, D. F. Macwatt, R. Ex. Comps. David F. Robertson, 
A. L. Tinker, J. D. Weir, O. W. Andreason. 



186 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



WARRANTS 

R. Ex. Comps. J. McC. Potts (Chairman), W. S. Milne, J. H. 
Shaw, David Railton, J. H. Bates, Leon G. Constable, R. S. Simpson, 
T. J. Cherry, M. E. Sherwood, J. A. Wray, C. L. VanWyck. 

CONDITION OF CAPITULAR MASONRY 

R. Ex. Comp. K. J. Dunstan (Chairman), M. Ex. Comp. A* 
Shaw, R. Ex. Comps. W. Y. Mills, J. O. R. McCurdy, C. H. Payne. 

CONSTITUTION, LAWS AND JURISPRUDENCE 

M. Ex. Comps. E. T. Malone (Chairman), D. F. Macwatt, 
F. W. Harcourt, R. Ex. Comp. A. Cowan. 

FRATERNAL DEAD 

M. Ex. Comp. W. S. R. Murch (Chairman), R. Ex. Comps. 
W. S. Milne, David F. Robertson, J. O. R. McCurdy. 

PRINTING COMMITTEE 

M. Ex. Comp. F. W. Harcourt (Chairman), R. Ex. Comps. 
A. L. Tinker, Henry T. Smith. 

CREDENTIAL COMMITTEE 

R. Ex. Comps. C. W. Haentschel (Chairman), R. W. Clewlo, 
W. H. Davis. 

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE 

R. Ex. Comp. E. B. Brown (Chairman). 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 



187 



List of Chapters— By Districts 



ST. CLAIR DISTRICT, NO. 1 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. Ross Russell Fleury, Windsor 



No. 

47. Wellington Chatham 

71. Pr. of Wales. . Amherstburg 

73. Erie Ridgetown 

80. Ark Windsor 



No. 

88. MacNabb Dresden 

119. King Cyrus. . .Leamington 

164. Lome West Lome 



LONDON DISTRICT NO. 2 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. A. M. Trick, London 



No. 

3. St. John's London 

5. St. George's London 

1 5 . Wawanosh Sarnia 

53. Bruce Petrolia 

54. Palestine St. Thomas 

74. Beaver Strathroy 

WILSON DISTRICT, NO. 3 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. M. E. Sherwood, Woodstock 



No. 

78. Minnewawa Parkhill 

81. Aylmer Aylmer 

150. London. London 

153. Sombra Sombra 

u.d. Vimy Inwood 



No. 

18. Oxford Woodstock 

20. Mount Horeb Brantford 

23. Ezra Simcoe 



No. 

41. 

115. 



Harris Ingersoll 

Brant Paris 



WELLINGTON DISTRICT, NO. 4 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. James D. Weir, Kitchener 



No. 

83. Ionic Orangeville 

117. Kitchener Kitchener 



No. 

32. Waterloo Gait 

40. Guelph Guelph 

67. Enterprise Harriston 

HAMILTON DISTRICT, NO. 5 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. James Henry Bates, Dundas 



No. 

2. The Hiram Hamilton 

6. St. John's Hamilton 

75. St. Clair Milton 



No. 

104. White Oak Oakville 

155. Ancaster Ancaster 

175. The Hamilton. . .Hamilton 



HURON DISTRICT, NO. 6 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. Leon G. Constable, St. 
Mary's 



No. 

24. Tecumseh Stratford 

30. Huron Goderich 

46. St. James St. Mary's 

63. Havelock Kincardine 

66. The Malloch Seaforth 



No. 
84. Lebanon Wingham 

129. Elliot Mitchell 

130. Chantry . . . .Southampton 

146. Berriard Listowel 

147. Lucknow Lucknow 



188 



GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



NIAGARA DISTRICT, NO. 7 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. Jas. A. Wray, Grimsby 



No. 

19. Mt. Moriah. .St. Catharines 

29. McCallum Dunnville 

55. Niagara Niagara 

57. King Hiram. . .Pt. Colborne 



No. 

64. Willson Welland 

69. Grimsby Grimsby 

76. Mt. Nebo. . .Niagara Falls 

184. Hugh Murray .. Bridgeburg 



TORONTO DISTRICT, NO. 8 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. Arthur L. Tinker, Toronto 



No. 

4. St. Andrew and 

St. John Toronto 

8. King Solomon's. . . .Toronto 

60. Doric Newmarket 

62. York N. Toronto 

65. St. Paul's Toronto 

77. Occident Toronto 

79. Orient Toronto 

91. Antiquity Toronto 



No. 

135. Succoth Uxbridge 

138. Shekinah. . . .West Toronto 
145. The St. Patrick. . .Toronto 

163. The Beaches Toronto 

185. Toronto Toronto 

195. Peel Brampton 

205. Victoria Thornhill 

212. Mount Sinai Toronto 



GEORGIAN DISTRICT, NO. 9 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. Clare Le Roy VanWyck, 
Owen Sound 



No. 

27. Manitou Collingwood 

34. Signet Barrie 

56. Georgian Owen Sound 

70. Grand River . . . Bracebridge 



No. 

86. Macpherson Meaford 

131. Amabel Wiarton 

167. Kichikewana . . . .Midland 
198. Couchiching Orillia 



ONTARIO DISTRICT, NO. 10 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. David Fleming Robertson, 
Campbellford 



No. 

28. Pentalpha Oshawa 

35. Keystone Whitby 

36. Corinthian Peterboro 

37. Victoria Port Hope 



45. 

48. 



Excelsior Colborne 

St. John's Cobourg 



No. 

94. Midland Lindsay 

110. Warkworth . . . Warkworth 
134. King Darius . . . Cannington 
139. St. Andrew's. . . .Havelock 

144. PresquTsle Brighton 

168. Ionic Campbellford 



PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT, NO. 11 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. James Oscar R. McCurdy, 

Belleville 



No. 

7. The Moira Belleville 

26. St. Mark's Trenton 

31. Prince Edward Picton 



No. 

44. Mount Sinai Napanee 

72. Keystone ... .... .Stirling 

161. Madoc Madoc 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 



189 



ST. LAWRENCE DISTRICT, NO. 12 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. John A. Fleming, Prescott 



No. 

1. Ancient Frontcnac and 

Cataraqui Kingston 

22. Grenville Prescott 

59. Sussex Brockville 

68. Maitland N. Augusta 



No. 

100. St. Lawrence . . Brockville 

112. St. John's Morrisburg 

113. Covenant Cornwall 

132. Leeds Gananoque 



OTTAWA DISTRICT, NO. 13 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. Robert S. Simpson, Ottawa 



No. 

16. 
01. 

114. 
116. 
133. 



Carleton Ottawa 

Granite Almonte 

Bonnechere Renfrew 

Maple Carleton PI. 

St. Francis. . Smith's Falls 



No. 

143. Glengarry Maxville 

148. St. John's. . .Vankleek Hill 
151. Laurentian . . . .Pembroke 
210. Kitchener Russell 



ALGOMA DISTRICT, NO. 14 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. T. J. Cherry, Keewatin 



82. Shuniah Port Arthur 

90. Golden Kenora 

140. Ft. William. . .Ft. William 



No. 

149. Atwood Rainy River 

152. Alberton Ft. Frances 



MANITOBA E. DISTRICT, NO. 15 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. J. L. McKay, Neepawa 



No. 

52. Pr. Rupert Winnipeg 

99. Keystone. .Po'ge la Prairie 

136. King Edward. . . .Neepawa 



No. 

171. Rabboni Dauphin 

187. Connaught Winnipeg 



MANITOBA W. DISTRICT, NO. 16 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. C. H. Payne, Rivers, Man. 



No. 

101. Corinthian . . . .Boissevain 

141. Keystone Brandon 



No. 

156. Avondale Hartney 

183. Mount Sinai Rivers 



SASKATCHEWAN N. DISTRICT, NO. 20 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. Otto Waldemar Andreason 
Humboldt 



No. 

160. Prince Albert. . . Pr. Albert 

165. Saskatoon Saskatoon 

181. Battleford Battleford 



No. 

207. King George Yorkton 

209. Humboldt Humboldt 



190 



GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



SASKATCHEWAN W. DISTRICT, NO. 21 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. George D. McMillian, 
Moose Jaw 



No. 

162. Moose Jaw. . . .Moose Jaw 

173. Weyburn Weyburn 

180. Estevan Estevan 



No. 

186. Unity Swift Current 

208. Assiniboia Assiniboia 

211. Shaunavon . . . .Shaunavon 



SASKATCHEWAN E. DISTRICT, NO. 22 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. David Railton, Sintaluta 



No. 

121. Wascana Regina 

166. Moose Mountain. . .Areola 
170. Golden Compass . Sintaluta 



No. 

192. Trinity Melville 

193. Govan Govan 

194. Orient Moosomin 



NEW ONTARIO DISTRICT, NO. 23 

Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. Alexander Daniel Meldrum, 

Sudbury 



No. 

58. Pembroke Mattawa 

95. Tuscan Sudbury 

102. Algonquin, Sault Ste. Marie 

103. St. John's North Bay 



No. 

169. Temiska'ng. New Liskeard 

203. Cobalt Cobalt 

213. Northern Lights . . Timmins 



UNATTACHED 

Acting Grand Superintendent — R. Ex. Comp. A. J. Gillis, 
Dawson 
No. 154, Klondike Dawson, Y.T. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 

CHAPTER RETURNS 



191 



Name of Chapter 



Where Held 



Regular Convocation 



Anct. Frontenac and 

Cataraqui 

The Hiram 

St. John's 

St. And. and St. John 

St. George's 

St. John's 

The Moira 

King Solomon's. . 

Wawanosh 

Carleton 

Oxford 

Mt. Moriah 

Mount Horeb. . . . 

Grenville 

Ezra 

Tecumseh 

St. Mark's 

Manitou 

Pentalpha 

McCallum 

Huron 

Prince Edward. . . 

Waterloo 

Signet 

Keystone 

Corinthian 

Victoria 

Guelph 

Harris 

Mount Sinai 

Excelsior 

St. James 

Wellington 

St. John's 

Prince Rupert 

Bruce 

Palestine 

Niagara 

Georgian 

King Hiram 

Pembroke 

Sussex 

Doric 

Granite 

York 

Havelock 

Willson 

St. Paul's 

TheMalloch 

Enterprise 

Maitland 

Grimsby 

Grand River 

Prince of Wales. . . 

Keystone 

Erie 

Beaver ... 

air 

Mount Nebo.. .... 

' tacident 

Minnewawa 

Orient 

Ark 

Aylmer 

•Shuniah 



Kingston 

Hamilton 

London 

Toronto 

London 

Hamilton 

Belleville 

Toronto 

Sarnia 

Ottawa 

Woodstock 

St. Catharines . 

Brantford 

Prescott 

Simcoe , 

Stratford , 

Trenton , 

Collingwood . . 

Oshawa 

Dunnville 

Goderich , 

Picton 

Gait 

Barrie 

Whitby 

Peterborough . . 

Port Hope 

Guelph 

Ingersoll 

Napanee 

Colborne 

St. Mary's 

Chatham 

Cobourg 

Winnipeg 

Petrolia 

St. Thomas 

Niagara 

Owen Sound . . . 

Port Colborne. 

Mattawa 

Brockville 

Newmarket. . . . 

Almonte 

Toronto 

Kincardine. . . . 

Welland 

Toronto 

Seaforth 

Harriston 

N. Augusta .... 

Grimsby 

Bracebridge. . . . 
Amherstburg. . . 

Stirling 

Ridgetown 

Strathroy 

Milton 

Niagara Falls . . 

Toronto 

Parkhill 

Toronto 

Windsor 

Aylmer 

Port Arthur. . . 



Third Friday 

Fourth Friday 

Fourth Wednesday 

Third Friday 

Fourth Friday 

Second Thursday 

First Tuesday 

Fourth Thursday 

Second Friday 

Third Friday 

Third Friday 

Second Friday 

First Friday 

Second Tuesday 

Thursday af . f . m 

Fourth Friday 

Third Tuesday 

Fourth Friday 

First Tuesday 

Third Friday 

Third Tuesday 

Monday on or af . f . m 

Second Monday 

Second Tuesday 

Third Friday 

Fourth Friday 

Second Friday 

Second Friday 

Fourth Friday 

Wednesday af . f . m 

First Tuesday 

Second Monday 

Second Thursday 

Friday on or b. f . m 

First Thursday 

Third Wednesday 

Second Thursday 

Thursday af . f . m 

Third Tuesday 

First Thursday 

Third Tuesday 

Third Friday 

First Wednesday 

Second Thursday 

First Friday 

Third Friday 

Last Wednesday 

Second Wednesday 

Third Monday 

First Monday 

Friday af . f . m 

First Monday 

Third Thursday 

First Friday 

Thursday b. f . m 

Monday on or af . f . m 

First Monday 

Thursday af . f . m 

Third Friday 

Second Friday 

Thursday on or af . f . m. . . 

Second Thursday 

Second Monday 

Friday af . f . m 

Third Wednesday 



192 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

CHAPTER RETURNS TO 31st DECEMBER. 1918 



First Principal Z. 



H. J. Milne 

Robt. Buchanan 

J. W. Wallace 

W. G. H. Ewing 

Frank S. Campbell . . . 

Herman R. Clark 

C. B. Scantlebury. . . . 
Frederick D. Hunt. . . 

J. E. B. Phelps 

A. H. McKee 

V. LeRoy Heath 

John Herod 

H. R. Ryan 

E. H. Greig 

A. J. Peachey 

F. S. Smith 

W. W. Bonisteel 

J. A. Caslake 

Donald Hall 

J. B. Cowles 

H. O. Sturdy 

E. H. Pearce 

J. P. Stuart 

Alexander Cowan 

F. G. Erskine 

G. W. Haley 

Arthur Mark 

John Gould 

A. S. Crawford 

A. MacGregor 

John Thomas Gordon. 

C. E. Richardson 

A. M. Burtch 

C. R. Gummow 

N. E. Nichols 

Johnston Vance 

Jas. Bristow 

F. J. McClelland 

C. T. Sutherland 

F. R. Johnson 

C. W. Haentschel 

Thomas Dowell 

Arthur Winn 

M. R. McFarlane. . . . 

Robert Shaw 

M. D. McPhail 

Percy Whitfield 

H. S. Park 

L. T. Delacey 

R. G. Barton 

G. W. Chapman 

J. B. Marlatt 

J. W. Reid 

C. R. Hackett 

T. E. B. Yeats 

Thos. E. Armstrong . . 

Alfred Stoner 

M. S. Sproat 

J. J. Foster 

John Russell 

F. T. Zapfe 

J. C. Bennett 

Ernest Sansburn 

L. H. Douglas 

A. M. Frank 



Scribe E. 



R. S. Graham 

Geo. H. Lanigan .... 

O. Ellwood. 

Oscar H. King 

P. P. Elliott 

Geo. H. Britton 

L. C. Yeomans 

Robt. A. Pearce 

Robt. Garrett 

L. C. Allen 

H. A. Biggins 

A. N. Lindsay 

F. S. Blain 

J. W. Ault 

Harry A. Johnston . . 

Jno. Stevenson 

R. H. Spencer 

Geo. C. Coles 

J. F. Grierson 

J. E. Yocum 

J. Straiton 

J. L. Gravdon 

Charles Blake 

A. H. Felt 

W. M. Van Valkenburgh 

W. A. Logan 

J. W. Sanders 

R. Donellan 

Chas. E. Cook 

E. J. Walters 

James Thorne 

Thos. L. Sinclair. . . . 

J. G. Martin 

Robt. Buck 

Geo. Syme. 

Jno. Sinclair 

W. E. Idsardi 

A. J. Coyne 

James Leslie 

Harry Davis 

J. D. Christie 

Jonathan Greene. . . . 

J. G. Muir 

J. B. Illingworth. . . . 

J. P. Argue 

J. A. Mackenzie 

Geo. Wells 

R. Cassels 

A. M. Barton 

W. D. McLellan 

G. A. Love 

A. H. Phipps 

Francis P. Warne 

B. P. Overholt 

James McP. Cotts. . . 

Harry Campbell 

R. M. Trueman 

Wm. Panton 

F. W. Swannell 

D. J. Proctor 

Wm. Dawson 

J. M. Malcolm 

John S. Master 

Wm. Stevenson 

T. J. C. Rodden 



s » 



156 

393 

363 

215 

324 

399 

201 

2SS 

284 

254 

87 

198 

208 

48 

146 

191 

104 

156 

134 

92 

95 

157 

133 

180 

80 

161 

129 

103 

84 

87 

74 

87 

242 

74 

404 

107 

263 

41 

127 

42 

53 

126 

60 

63 

110 

70 

156 

220 

67 

117 

35 

103 

79 

125 

80 

97 

73 

73 

173 

426 

70 

143 

355 

115 

198 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 



193 



CHAPTER RETURNS 



No. 


Name of Chapter 


Where Held 


Regular Convocation 


83 


Ionic 

Lebanon 

Macpherson 

MacNabb 






S4 




Third Tuesday 


SG 




Third Thursday. . . 


ss 




First Thursday af. f. m. . 
Third Friday 




90 


Golden 






81 






94 


Midland 




Third Thursday 


95 




















Portage la Prairie . . . 


First Friday 


100 


St. Lawrence 


First Thursday 


101 






102 




Sault Ste. Marie 




103 






104 


White Oak 




Third Tuesday 


110 






Monday af . f . m 

Tuesday af . f . m 

Third Wednesday 

Third Monday 




112 


St. John's 






113 








114 








115 








116 




Carleton Place 




117 




Third Friday 


119 








120 








121 








122 








123 






Third Wednesday 




124 


Westminster 

Rocky Mt 


New Westminster . . . 




125 




127 
















128 


Elliot 


Mitchell . . . 


Second Tuesday af. f . m. 




130 




Southampton 




131 






132 






First Wednesday 

Second Friday af . f . m. . . 
First Wednesday af. f . m. 




133 




Smith's Falls 




134 


King Darius 




135 






136 


King Edward 

Crow's Nest 

Shekinah 




Second Wednesday af. f. 




*137 


Fernie 




138 






139 


St. Andrew's 

Fort William 






140 


Fort William 


First Friday 


141 




t!42 


Cyrus 


Cumberland 




143 






HI 


Presqu'Isle 






145 


The St. Patrick 

Bernard 




Third Saturday. . . . 


146 






147 


Lucknow 




Thursday af. f. m 




14s 


St. John's 


VankleekHill 

Rainy River 




149 


Atwood 


Third Thursday. . . 


150 


London 


Third Tuesday . . . 


151 


Laurentian 




Third Thursday . . . 


152 


Alberton 


Fort Frances 


Second Thursday 

Third Wednesday 




153 


Sombra 




154 


Klondike 






156 


Ancaster 




Tuesday af . f . m 

Friday on or af . f . m. . . . 




156 


Avondale 






157 


Okanagan 






160 


Prince Albert 


Prince Albert 


Third Tuesday 



♦No return. Warrant surrendered. 
f\'o return. 



194 



GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



CHAPTER RETURNS TO 31st DECEMBER, 1918 



6 

55 

s 

ft 
O 


First Principal Z. 


Scribe E. 


-2 9 

CO 


1 

33 

CO 

a 

< 


M 

a 

a 
'0 

*-> 


CO 

i 



a 

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1 

a 


m 

a 


a 

| 
■i 

DQ 


a 


00 

A CO 

CO 




3 

a 


i 

1 

Q 


83 


E. E. Wilson 




70 

58 

64 

67 

133 

242 

120 

106 

224 

82 

87 

109 

286 

128 

68 

44 

74 

105 

90 

54 

78 

106 

100 

40 

232 

102 

100 

160 

125 

86 

101 

46 

51 

39 

86 

68 

52 

80 

180 

58 

165 

77 

207 

78 

45 

39 

39 

464 

49 

36 

34 

73 

180 

48 

41 

86 

121 

65 

105 

60 

79 


8 

10 

4 

2 

10 

47 

4 

4 

25 

2 

1 

3 

20 

"2 

"5 

2 
8 
6 
3 
6 
12 


"i 

1 

'2 

'2 

2 

i 

2 


i 

'2 

2 
1 

i 

1 

'3 

1 


i 

1 

"6 
1 
2 
4 
1 
1 
6 
4 
1 

"i 
' i 


2 
1 
3 

20 

5 

20 

i 

6 

2 
11 

1 
9 

1 

'l 
3 


1 

2 

1 
4 

1 

4 

6 
2 
3 
3 

4 

1 

1 
2 

i 

'2 
2 
1 
5 

'3 
1 
4 
3 
3 

1 

2 

i 

'2 
1 


77 

67 

65 

67 

141 

265 

123 

102 

222 

81 

83 

98 

301 

117 

69 

43 

75 

107 

88 

59 

80 

106 

111 

38 

235 

101 

95 

163 

130 

90 

98 

48 

48 

36 

78 

74 

52 

93 

184 


7 
9 

1 

"8 

23 
3 

15 

"i 

!!i 

2 

"5 
2 

11 

'3 

' '3 
5 

4 

"2 

' 6 

13 
4 




84 


R. A. Coutts 


H. E. W. Tamlyn 

F. H. Finley 




86 


Albert G. Bright 




88 


R. D. McAlpine 

H. S. Galloway 




90 


H. O. Holden. . 




91 


W. J. Armstrong 






94 


R. G. Corneil 




95 

98 


Win. McDonald 


A. D. Meldrum 


4 



99 


W. R. Grieve .... 


E. A. Williams 


1 


100 


C. H. Begley. ...... 


Geo. W. Morrison 


4 


101 


Samuel McBride 

Wesley Johnson 

H. G. Thorpe 


11 


102 


W. T. Scott 




103 




11 


104 




W. K. Leggatt 




110 




P. S. Ewing 


1 


112 


R. H. Ashton 


B. A. Herring 




113 


W. W. Sheets 


J. Ridley 




114 


W. N. H. Quartermaine . 


H. Macdonald 





115 


Geo. E. Taylor 




116 


M. H. Steele.. 


A. H. Edwards 




117 


J. F. Carmichael 


J. D. Weir 






4 

"i 
9 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
3 

"2 

1 

6 

1 




119 


A. T. Bristow 




120 




James Anderson 

Francis B. Reilly 

G. W. Dunn 


•? 


121 


S. McLarty 


14 


3 

1 






122 




1 


123 






^i 


124 






5 
10 
8 
3 
2 


1 


1 




125 


T. J. Brown 


A. C. Shankland 

John F. Doyle 




127 






128 


E. A. MacKenrot 

Fred Porterfield 

J. D. McLeod . . 




it 


129 


Wm. Babb 




130 


R. B. Hillmer. . . 


s 


131 




S. E. Foster 

J. H. Valleau 








3 


13? 




1 

7 

ii 

8 

42 
8 

19 
1 

"2 
5 

133 
6 
2 
3 

"9 
3 
5 
5 


1 




s 


133 


Harry W. Aunger 

W. H. Bick. 


G. W. Fluker 




134 


T. H. Foster 




135 


Julius W. Rynard 

D. E. Pollock 


V. M. Hare.. 




136 


Chas. H. Pattison 




3 

.58 






137 




58 


138 


John F. McLennan 

G. R. McGregor 


Wm. J. Wadsworth 

H. F. McNichol 

C. J. Moors 


1 
7 
4 
1 

13 

1 
2 

4 


2 

2 

1 

'7 
3 

.2 

1 
2 
4 

i 

1 


204 
76 

222 
77 
45 
41 
44 

571 
49 
33 
37 
73 

190 
49 
40 
89 

114 
73 

109 
57 
83 


39 
15 

'2 
5 

107 

*3 

io 
1 

'3 

4 
4 




139 
140 


i 

1 

'2 

1 
1 


2 
1 

'3 


2 
2 
1 

ii 

2 
3 

"2 
"3 

"2 

4 


1 


141 


C. S. Marshall 


W. E. Crawford 

Chas. J. Parnham 

D. P. McDiarmid 

Oscar L. Morrow 


■\ 


142 
143 


Geo. K. McNaughton . . . 
J. H. Munro 




144 
145 


Vernon Coulter 




146 




Noah Blackmore 

W. W. Hill 




147 




3 


148 
149 
150 


Wm. S. Hall 

A. Murdoch 


Arch. D. McCrae 

Malcolm McNeill 

C. C. Reed 




151 


J. S. Fraser 


R. L. McCormick 

D. J. Gillon 




15? 


J. W. Walker . . 


1 


153 


W. E. Stover 


W. W. Stover 




154 


W. B. Rheinhardt 

Ward Roelofson 

R. M. Smith... 


Frank H. Osborn 

Robert Ferguson 

A. T. Foot 


7 


155 
156 


8 
5 
1 
5 


1 


1 




157 


W. B. Higgins 

J. N. Smith 


E. F. Lloyd 


3 


160 


J. McMillan 





ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 



195 



CHAPTER RETURNS 



\o. 


Name of Chapter 


Where Held 


Regular Convocation 


101 






Tuesday af . f . m 


162 






103 


The Beaches 






104 






lt».") 






Third Friday 


166 


Moose Mountain.. . . 
Kichikewana 






1(17 


Midland 




168 


Campbellford 

New Liskeard 




1fi9 


Teniiskaming 

Golden Compass. . . . 




170 




171 






173 






Second Wednesday 

Third Thursday 


174 




Grand Forks 


17:. 


The Hamilton 


Third Tuesday 


*177 






17s 




Prince Rupert 




ian 






181 


Battleford 


Battleford 


Third Thursday . . . 


182 








1^;; 


Mount Sinai 

Hugh Murray 

Toronto 




Third Friday 


184 






is.", 






186 




Swift Current 


Second Wednesday 


187 


Connaught 


190 


Pacific 






191 


X Vancouver 


N. Vancouver 

Melville 




19? 




193 


Govan 






194 






Wednesday af . f . m 


195 


Peel 




19S 


Couchiching. ..".... 

Cobalt .... 

Victoria 

Kelowna 

King George. ..*.... 
Assiniboia 


Orillia 




203 


Cobalt 


Third Tuesday 


205 


Thornhill 


Second Wednesday 




Kelowna 


207 
208 


Yorkton 


Thursday af . f . m 


209 


Humboldt 

Kitchener 


Humboldt 


Third Thursday . . . 


210 


Russell 




211 


Shaunavon 




Tuesday af . f . m 


212 


Mount Sinai 

Northern Lights 


Toronto 


213 


Timmins 











Joined with Grand Chapter of Alberta. 



196 



GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



CHAPTER RETURNS TO 31st DECEMBER, 1918 



6 

! 


First Principal Z. 


Scribe E. 


(P . 

s « 

in 

CO 


1 - 

a 

.2 
'8 

m 
1 
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(73 

W 

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"3 
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a 

03 


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P 


00 

it 

co 

CO 


9 

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3 
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161 
162 
163 
164 


J.J. Porritt 

J. E. McFee 

W. E. Nugent.... 

W. H. Bole 

Gilbert Swain.. . . 
E. W. F. Harris.. 
J. M. H. McGuire 
I. A. Humphries.. 
H. W. Sutcliffe... 
T. E. Partridge. . . 

Thos. Walker 

T. G. Laing 

John McKie 

L. F. Stephens . . . 


Will J. Hill 

C. Albert Smith.. 

R. E. Miller 

J. B. Ferguson. . . 

Geo. L. Pow 

W. F. Youngblud. 

R. D. Keefe 

P. C. Denyes 

C. A. Byam 

F. M. Dundas. . . . 

H. W. Culver 

J. H. Hilliar 

Wm. J. Cook. . . . 
W. F. McGiverin. 


77 

263 

86 

59 

273 

75 

100 

82 

160 

47 

118 

94 

43 

98 

32 

88 

64 

75 

104 

79 

45 

179 

112 

103 

96 

52 

74 

79 

76 

29 

83 

70 

23 

39 

63 

33 

85 

20 

33 


7 

14 
4 
1 

46 
2 

10 
7 

12 
2 
4 
5 


1 
4 

1 




1 
2 
1 


3i 


' 5 

"l 

6 
3 
3 

2 
1 
1 

"6 

1 
1 


84 
243 

90 

59 
314 

64 
107 

87 
126 

48 
118 

86 

42 
101 


7 

" 4 


'20 


165 
166 
167 


4 


3 

2 


6 

10 


"2 


41 

5 

.... 


ii 


168 












169 
170 


1 




5 


41 


34 


171 




1 
2 


1 
2 


4 

7 




173 
174 


"3 


8 


175 


4 












177 








3? 


3?! 


178 
180 
181 
182 
183 


Thos. McClymont 
L. A. Duncan.. . . 
Geo. H. Bond.... 
V. W. Stewart. . . 

Geo. Frame 

JohnG. Watts. . . 
J. M. Malcolm.. . 
D. W. Graham... 
John Parton 

C. Bullard 

Samuel Fea 

H. Bateman 

R. Dickey 

D. M. Tubman... 
T. H. Moorehead 
D. H. McGill.... 

T. A. Jeacle 

Everett S. Cox... 

D. W. Sutherland. 

F. J. Moritz 

J. E. McFetridge. 
O. W. Andreasen. 

A. Walker 

Jas. McCouvrey. . 

E. J. Repath 

R. J. Jemmett. . . 


Doug. Sutherland 
James A. Smith . . 
W. R. Ridington. 

F. R. Exham 

C. H. Payne 

Jno. A. North 

Alex. Innes. ..... 

S. F. L. Partridge. 
John Macwhirter. 
John G. Scott. . . . 

John B. Bennett.. 

J. Henning 

J. Orville Clarke. . 
A. T. Kenward... 

W. C. Young 

P. Kelly 


11 

3 

75 

11 

2 


3 

1 
1 


4 


2 

1 
2 
3 




3 

"2 


97 
71 

147 
112 

80 
46 
207 
117 
115 
92 
50 
74 
89 
79 
32 
85 
78 
25 
41 
73 
41 
80 
25 
38 
65 
38 


9 

7 

72 

8 

1 

1 

28 

5 

12 




184 


"32 

5 

14 
6 
2 
7 

16 
6 
3 
5 

14 
2 
2 

11 
8 


1 












185 
186 


1 


2 


1 


2 




187 
190 
191 
IP? 






1 
3 
3 
1 
2 
3 


"7 
1 
2 
4 


1 
"4 


4 
2 


193 
194 
195 


10 
3 
3 
2 
8 
2 
2 

10 
8 

""5 

5 

65 

38 




198 






1 
4 


1 


1 
2 




203 
205 


F. H. Todd, Actg. 

J. E. Francis 

G.A.Melville.. .. 

C. Holmes 

D. McA. Ross. . . . 
H. Cheetham .... 
J. A. Cochrane. . . 

Hugh Brown 

C. E. Garrard 




206 














207 










1 




208 












209 








3 


2 


5 


210 


5 

7 
35 
19 










211 










2 
2 
1 




21? 


32 

20 










213 


































19,601 


1,672 


122 


58 


357 


375 


317 


20,404 


1,129 


326 



RECAPITULATION 



Number of Chapters, Warranted 165 

Number of Members, December 31st, 1917 19,601 

Number of Registrations, " 1918 1,672 

Number of Joinings, " 122 

Number of Restorations, " " . 58 

1,852 

Number of Withdrawals, " 1918 357 

Number of Suspensions, " " 375 

Number of Deaths, " " 317 

1,049 

Net Gain 803 

Total Membership, December 31st, 1918 20,404 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 197 

SUSPENSIONS. 

Chapter. 

No. 1. Elmer Fern Waldner. 

No. 2. John Anderson, Wra. E. Brown, William Brown, Gilbert 
Clayton, John A. Clark, Geo. J. Foulis, J. K. Cross, 
John Moffatt, Henry Alexander McCoy, Frank Robin- 
son, Bernard Wilhelm, John Wood, Walter R. Thomson, 
Sidney T. Tribute. 

No. 3. Chas. Abbott, V. W. Burridge. 

No. 4. William Williamson. 

No. 5. James W. Bailey, W. J. Mountjoy, E. T. Richards, Wm. 
Ward, Roy S. Burridge, Edmund Crawford, A. M. 
Campbell, H. T. Stearn. 

No. 8. J. Sharp, John W. Hand, Arthur Brown. 

No. 16. Jos. Lewis Heald, John Roland Hill, Albert Edward 
Morris, Chas. Howard Putnam, Thos. E. Burgess, 
Fred C. Carruthers, Lawrence Fleet Christie, Jas. Alex. 
McColm, William Hy. Townsen. 

No. 20. Archibald Dawson, Ross Allen Rastall, John Hanlan 
Hines, Ross Byron Ramsey, Harry Joseph Wallace, 
Percy S. Thornton, Norval John Gowland, David Miller, 
Alfred Edward Edwards, Reginald A. W. Rastall, Cecil 

E. Beare, John Harvey Runchey, Morgan E. Harris, 
James S. Scott, Thomas Anderson, Earl Trumper. 

No. 23. William R. Shearer, Wilson McPherson, Alex. Leitch, 
Enoch Lee Roberts, Chas. W. Culver, J. E. Butler, 
J. E. Blayney. 

No. 26. Glen R. White. 

40. Howard H. Dean, George Sleeman. 

41. William Partlo, H. O. Wright, Sterling H. Warnock, 

George Wilson, Austin P. Lachapelle, Herbert P. 

Snuttleworth, David Vance, Henry S. Eyre, William 

Pullen, William John Clarke. 
No. 44. David Robert Benson, Wilbert Woodcock. 
No. 47. Alex. Carter, F. E. Fisher, H. P. Naylor, H. E. Whately. 
No. 54. Niel McQueen Ramsay. 
No. 57. Richard Mathews, Roy Watson. 
N< >. 59. Horace N. Gardiner, Harry F. Laughlin, Donald McAlpine, 

Ezra M. Robinson, Ernest A. Hudson. 
()2. Edward Jackson, William S. Thompson. 

63. Andrew Cormack. 

64. Harlem Bemiss, Fred Gourlay, Norman Shaffer, Harry 

Keenan, John Gordon, P. S. Peacock, J. L. Brodie, 

F. C. Margett, Wm. Moleskv, Roy Fries, A. S. Myhill, 
Jos. R. Willson, C. B. Ayers, Fred Sparks, H. O. 
Lovejoy, J. A. Green, N. C. Burdick. 

No. 69. Wellington B. VanDyke, Charles I. Pettit, Hugh Francis 

Vidal. 
No. 72. George Douglas McCullough. 
No. 77. H. M. McNeil, J. T. Waterman, J. W. Rudolph, H. C. 

Alexander, W. H. White, F. Macoomb, E. Hadley, W T m. 

Haslam, K. J. Cross, A. M. W T ickens, H. Bedell, J. A. 



198 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Allan, C. M. Lowden, J. T. King, C. L. Gray, C. C. 

Wightman, W. H. Minshull, C. W. F. Howard, Fred 

Pearson, Francis J. McFarlane, C. A. H. Clark, D. H. 

Colquhoun, G. H. Woodburn, F. H. Cunningham, J. T. 

Alexander, W. Hutchinson, J. McD. Sharpe, J. Mc- 

Lachlan. 
No. 78. Armenis A. Towns. 
No. 79. John Andrews, Thomas Newell, Charles Taylor, Thomas 

Edmund Wrenshall. 
No. 80. Joseph Henry Carson, David Earl, Malcolm Leybourne, 

William Edward Meadows, John Norbury, Herbert 

O'Neil, Sidney Edward Rigg. 
No. 84. Leslie McLaughlin, Joseph Gibson. 
No. 86. Griffin S. Rogers. 

No. 88. Charles Swanison, Samuel McMath, W. C. Curtis. 
No. 91. J. A. Currie, J. H. E. Bennett, H. Barr, W. C. Bullock, 

W. W. Demmery, O. L. Gardner, A. Hendrie, G. D. 

Lloyd, R. S. McMillan, R. J. Redfern, J. Davies, E. F. 

Hick, S. Maguire, T. A. Neeley, A. Ross, G. H. Stroud, 

W. Stansfield, W. E. Tibbets, H. R. G. Watson, F. 

Kelly. 
No. 95. Charles Douglas, Charles W. Caron, William Harland, 

William George Gillespie, William John Hambly. 
No. 98. R. L. Betts, J. A. Chisholm, James Doig, R. C. Hodgson, 

S. N. Jarrett, J. B. Kay, R. W. T. Kirby, T. Larney, 

T. Morley, P. McNaughton, James McGown, Norman 

McLeod, H. Newmarch, C. E. Robson, J. Duff Stuart, 

L. D. Swenerton, H. Sinclair, W. R. Vye, A. Wallace, 

D. McDermott. 
No. 100. George N. Robinson. 

No. 101. Stewart Burrows, Arthur George Harris, Robert Ritchie, 

E. J. Tuck, Ingmar Peterson, Fred Stebbing. 
No. 102. John Lamb, Alexander Heller. 

No. 103. James Arthurs, Arthur Lewis Francis Brymer, Angus D. 

Mclnnis, John Robertson Moffat, Norman S. Vander- 

burg, George P. Angus, Emiel Leslie Welte, Harry W. 

Angus, William Albert Griffin, William John Parsons, 

William A. Martyn. 
No. 112. C. D. Bouck. 
No. 114. Thomas Burt, David Craig, Henry Edward Hudson, 

Duncan J. McKillop, Lome Eldon Rowley, Wm. Mark 

Senn, David Hewart, Robert C. Timmins, Thomas C. 

Young. 
No. 116. Frederick G. Robinson. 
No. 123. Joseph Kerr Salter. 

No. 132. Sam. Angrove, F. M. Dillon, N. J. McKinley. 
No. 138. John Stanley McGuirl. 
No. 139. F. J. Squires, H. G. Frances, J. H. Boylan, W. J. Miller, 

W. H. Gillies, W. C. Inkster, F. R. Wells. 
No. 140. T. E. Dean, W. H. Laverty, Jno. McClure, Jos. Hy. 

Rodgers. 
No. 141. Charles F. Eagles. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 199 

No. 145. J. C. Bradley, W. R. Fenton, J. H. Fussell, M. B. R. 
Gordon, A. J. Hewitt, C. A. Hendry, F. P. Hall, W. S. 
Hargott, D. F. Johnstone, J. F. Lindsay, R. S. McColl, 
F. W. Niehans, C. C. Richardson. 

No. 146. John E. Lang. 

No. 147. Donald Cameron, W. S. Holmes. 

No. 152. William Bishop, J. A. Osborne, D. H. Campbell, C. F. 

McGregor. 
No. 162. William E. Alexander, Charles Antriter, A. E. Beaton, 
Geo. P. Bowden, Charles Cavanaugh, Johnson Cherry, 
Thomas Caswell, L. A. Douglas., James Gowan, George 
Hall, F. W. Hinton, Arthur R. Lowe, James D. Munra, 
William M. Maclntyre, Frank Proby, Harry Palmer, 
Alastoir J. Poison, James D. Proctor, Bernard C. 
Pitman, James Webster, Ralph Wayland, Alexander 
Robertson, Lachlan McTavish, John B. Rice, Ben 
Stewart, Edward Sunington, Percy Sunington, James 
B. Swanson, George Sibbett, Alfred Woodard, George 
Whitby. 

No. 166. John H. Morrison, John Gordon Sullivan. 

No. 169. L. H. Neil, H. J. Deyell, J. W. Ellard, C. H. Chapin, Jno. 
McLeod, I. E. Virgin, G. F. Cairnie, C. Devlin, E. 
Goodman, G. S. Stewart, R. W. Woods, W. R. Sullivan, 
N. R. Green, S. Solomon, M. F. Purnaville, W. E. 
McCready, B. J. Stallwood, P. Harris, L. Jacob, A. 
Macksond, N. C. Groch, N. W. Pierce, W. F. Mc- 
Dermott, J. Arthur, S. Stahl, A. H. Stewart, R. F. 
Killock, J. A. Herman, J. G. Fitzsimmons, W. R. 
Nickle, J. H. Shillinglaw, C. R. Thompson, C. Spear- 
man, J. H. Stewart, E. Monaghan, J. W. Swent, J. F. 
Askwith, A. W. Charland, S. A. Cummingford, E. B. 
Thornhill, E. E. Holton. 
171. Alonzo Cyrus Crosby, Sidney W. Hanchitt, David Hal 

Sutherland, Albert Edward Iredale. 
173. Geoffrey Wilfrid Yates, Hugh A. McCuaig, John Thomas 
Stainsby, William Alvin Hurlburt, Ernest Bowman, 
James Kennedy Brimacombe, Guy Grover West. 

No. 185. William John Simmons. 

No. 190. John Edward Ardell, James Torrance Armstrong, James 
Alexander Chambers, Fred Milton Kimbull, Frank 
Nesby Rees, Robert Campbell Timmons, Wesley 
Johnson Taber. 

No. 191. Daniel Amskold. 

No. 192. David Craig, C. D. Walker. 

No. 193. John Bradley, Charles Harry Wright, Edwin Wood, 
Duncan McLachlan. 

No. 198. R. J. Carson. 

No. 209. Thomas Ridgeway Bolsover, William, Nassau Duff, Alex. 
Xeil Wilkinson. 



200 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

RESTORATIONS. 

Chapter. 

No. 2. J. K. Cross. 

No. 3. F. J. Layman, J. B. Adams. 

No. 4. Benjamin G. Stephenson. 

No. 24. Arthur H. Goetz. 

No. 26. Frank J. Farley. 

No. 30. Robert McKay. 

No. 31. John S. Williams. 

No. 44. Walter A. Cavers. 

No. 48. Robert Morrow. 

No. 52. James Thompson Black. 

No. 59. Matt. Harold Potter, Frederick McLennan. 

No. 60. Thomas Frank Cook, John Spalding. 

No. 62. Thomas H. Scott. 

No. 73. Harold G. McFarlane, Jas. R. Marshall, J. D. Brien. 

No. 77. Reginald G. Jones, David McCrorrie, Hugh Johnston, 

Harry Pickard. 

No. 84. Arthur H. Carr. 

No. 88. Richard Perrin, Clinton Fritz.* 

No. 90. John McKenzie, Henry Robert Phipps. 

No. 91. Richard Hayes. 

No. 95. Joseph Errington. 

No. 98. Simon Peter Conroy. 

No. 102. John James Carrick, James Thomas Nibbs, Henry 

Dubois. 

No. 103. Murdoch McLeod. 

No. 119. Robert Walter Simpson. 

No. 124. Richard A. Henderson. 

No. 127. John Dick Galloway. 

No. 139. Edgar W. Pickford, A. D. Carey. 

No. 140. Wm. A. Butler. 

No. 145. W. H. Nixon, James W. Commeford, D. F. Johnstone. 

No. 156. Howard Meredith Jackson. 

No. 165. John McNee Dawson, Charles Henry Wentz, Herbert 

Gilbert Wilkie. 

No. 166. E. W. F. Harris, W. H. Montgomery. 

No. 171. Chas. Edward Davis Kennedy. 

No. 173. Samuel James Taylor, Robert J. Brandon. 

No. 180. Harry F. Turner, Peter Lyall, C. A. Wynne Jones, Lawson 

Mead. 

No. 185. Charles J. F. Collier. 



202 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

M. EX. COMPANION 

3to(m &os& Eobertstott 

PAST GRAND Z. 



Grand Representative — New York 



DIED 31st MAY, 1918 



TORONTO, ONT. 



R. EX. COMPANION 

3teaac imber 

PAST GRAND SUPERINTENDENT 



Georgian District, No. 9 



DIED 20th JULY, 1918 



BRACEBRIDGE, ONT. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 203 



R. EX. COMPANION 

Jofjn JL premtan 

PAST GRAND REGISTRAR 



DIED 26th JANUARY, 1918 



TORONTO, ONT. 



V. EX. COMPANION 

&V\mtv Albert lufee 

PAST GRAND DIRECTOR OF CEREMONIES 



DIED 23rd NOVEMBER, 1918 



OTTAWA, ONT. 



204 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 




Chapter. 

No. 1. Robert Hendry, 8 Feb., 1918 ; William Morris 
Baillie, 11 June, 1918 ; Robert J. Free, Sept., 
1918 ; William George Hazlett, Oct., 1918 ; 
Horace Albert Jenkins, 19 Oct., 1918 ; H. J. 
Wilkinson (date not given) ; W. C. Wright 
(date not given). 

No. 2. Vantry Laurent King, 20 April, 1918 ; William 
Hancock, 12 July, 1918 ; William Smith, 28 
Oct., 1918 ; Joel Ward, 30 Oct., 1918. 

No. 3. A. E. Carrothers, 5 July, 1918 ; W. D. Taylor, 
16 July, 1918 ; E. J. Wells, Aug., 1918 ; A. S. 
Wallace (date not given) ; Wm. Gray (date 

not given). 

No. 4. Thomas B. Col^ July, 1918; R. J. Devlin, Feb., 
1918 ; John Ross Robertson, 31 May, 1918 ; 
Louis Seivert, Aug., 1918 ; Dr. Walter 
Norman Brown, Aug., 1918 ; Alex. W. Robb, 
Jan., 1918. 

No. 5. Edward C. Efner, 17 Oct., 1918 ; William H. 
Escott, 14 Oct., 1918 ; Percy Trebilcock, 
16 Oct., 1918 ; William Grassick, 24 Oct., 
1918 ; A. G. Smythe, 6 Dec, 1918. 

No. 6. Richard H. Lardman, 17 Jan., 1918 ; Ralph L. 
Gunn, 3 Oct., 1918 ; William Jarvis, 3 Oct., 
1918 ; George B. Dowswell, 21 Nov., 1918 ; 
George H. Sholters, 21 Nov., 1918 ; John 
McRoberts, 23 Nov., 1918. 

No. 7. Frederick Wm. Millard, 20 April, 1918 ; Frank 
Elvins, 28 April, 1918 ; Wm. A. Shaw, April, 
1918 ; Arthur Eugene Wrightmyer, 17 Oct., 
1918 ; Alfred John McCrodan, 23 Oct., 1918 ; 
Walter Alford, 19 Aug., 1918. 

No. 8. William J. Wilson, 8 April, 1918 ; J. Ross 
Robertson, 31 May, 1918. 

No. 15. Grant Home, 3 Aug., 1918 ; Jas. D. McGibbon, 
5 May, 1918 ; Thos. Wright, Sept., 1918 ; 
Fred C. Watson, 24 Nov., 1918. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 205 



©eatl)* 



. 



Chapter. 

No. 16. Sidney Albert Luke, 23 Nov., 1918 ; Henry 
C. Chapman, 28 Oct., 1918 ; Alexander 
Connor, 22 Dec., 1918 ; Frank Hunt, 6 Nov., 
1918 ; Rufus Augustus DeOlloqui, 14 Jan., 
1917 ; David M. Chambers, 11 Jan., 1917. 

No. 18. John Carruthers, 6 April, 1918. • 

No. 19. A. R. Thompson, 19 May, 1918 ; John R. 
Wilson, 23 Dec, 1918 ; John W. Coy, 22 
June, 1918. 

No. 20. Albert Edward Faulkner (date not given) ; 
Edward McDonald (date not given). 

No. 22. John A. Lock, Oct., 1918 ; Leonard Foster 
Jamieson, 27 June, 1918. 

No. 23. Robert A. Sinclair ; Robt. J. Miller ; James 
Downing ; Thomas Puzey (dates not given). 

Xo. 24. George Franklin Pounder, 12 Dec, 1918 ; 
Stanley Howson Brocklebank, 20 Sept., 1918 ; 
James Watt Lowe, 21 Aug., 1917 ; Alexander 
Angus McKenzie, 21 May, 1918. 

No. 26. Allan Robertson, 28 June, 1918 ; Robert Albert 
Hendricks, 26 Sept., 1918. 

No. 27. Robert S. Dey, Aug., 1918 ; Andrew W. Duncan, 
Oct., 1918 ; John William Murphy, Dec, 
1918 ; John Nettleton, 9 Jan., 1916. 

Xo. 28. William Holland, June, 1918 ; Herbert James 
Harris, 19 Feb., 1918 ; James S. Lunney, 1 
Oct., 1918. 

No. 30. Hugh H. Polley, 8 July, 1918 ; Edward R. G. 
Watson, 16 Sept., 1918 ; Jas. Robinson, 6 
Dec, 1918. 

No. 31. D. Herbert Payne, 10 Sept., 1918 ; H. Jarvis 
English, 27 Oct., 1918. 

No. 34. John A. Bell (about Aug., 1918). 



206 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



©eatftf 


Chapter. 




No. 36. 


Frederick William Trebilcock, 8 Oct., 1918. 


No. 37. 


John Henry Helm, 6 June, 1918. 


No. 40. 


John Scoon, 3 March, 1918 ; Robt. Stewart, 
20 July, 1918 ; Milford Purvis, 30 Oct., 1918. 


No. 41. 


Phillip Willits, 28 Feb., 1918. 


No. 45. 


Oscar Addison Simmons, 28 March, 1918 ; 
Willis A. Sargent, 1 Nov., 1918 ; Stephen 
Edway Fuller, 8 Oct., 1918. 



No. 47. John M. Park, 24 Dec, 1917 ; Norman A. 
Brown, 14 Oct., 1918. 

No. 52. James A. Wilson, 29 Jan., 1918 ; A. McLaren, 

17 Jan., 1918. 

No. 53. Robert Alexander Stauffer, 10 April, 1918. 

No. 54. Ira Thomas Pye Snelgrove, 8 Aug., 1918 ; 
Robert James Anderson, 5 Oct., 1918. 

No. 56. Samuel Loyd, 14 June, 1914 ; Robert McNight, 
24 June, 1918 ; Neil Campbell, 2 Sept., 1918 ; 
Morell Oldham, 1918. 

No. 57. John Cook, 5 July, 1918. 

No. 58. William B. Wilson, 20 Sept., 1918 ; Silas George 
Richardson, 9 Oct., 1918. 

No. 59. Herbert H. Edwards, 11 May, 1918 ; Charles 
E. Simpson, 24 April, 1918. 

No. 60. Leonard L. Ferguson, 4 March, 1918. 

No. 61. O. M. Groves, 9 Oct., 1918. 

No. 62. William Dimond, 5 June, 1918 ; Dalton I. Ball, 

18 Oct., 1918. 

No. 63. Laughlan McLean, 27 July, 1918 ; John Camp- 
bell McLeod, 10 May, 1918. 



J 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 207 




Chapter. 

No. 64. Gustavus M. Davis, Aug., 1918 ; Hermon Leslie 
Oliver, Dec., 1918. 

No. 65. Arthur Macdonald Brooke, 23 Oct., 1918 ; 
Hugh Lewis Hoyles, 1918 ; Armour Adamson 
Miller, 25th June, 1918 ; John Sinclair 
Robertson, June, 1918 ; Harry A. Sherrard, 
April, 1918. 

No. 66. James Fisher Reid, Nov., 1918. 

No. 67. Ernest W. Lambert, 13 June, 1918 ; Charles 
H. Heuther, Nov., 1918 ; Horace Parker, 
1918 ; Samuel Charles Southgate, 1918. 

No. 68. Gordon Ross Putnam, 20 March, 1918 ; Lome 
E. Shepard, 2 Nov., 1918. 

No. 69. L. F. Jamieson, 27 June, 1918 ; Richard Lipsit, 
14 Dec, 1918 ; Norman R. Sutherland, 26 
Dec, 1918 ; William Clarke, 6 Dec, 1918 ; 
Albert R. Henry, 21 Nov., 1918 ; William 
E. Millward, 7 May, 1918. 

No. 70. Isaac Huber, 20 July, 1918 ; Harold Vaughan 
Kinsey, 2 Dec, 1918. 

No. 73. Alfred Long, 27 June, 1918 ; Ross M. Ellsworth, 
18 Oct., 1918. 

No. 74. Oliver Munger, 16 Dec, 1918. 

No. 75. John Henry Peacock, 15 Jan., 1918 ; Clarence 
William Field, 7 Dec, 1918 ; James Richard 
Nixon, 3 Oct., 1918 ; D. Alton Campbell, 6 
Nov., 1918 ; Archd. J. McKinnon, 17 Nov., 
1918. 

No. 76. Richard Sloggett, 20 May, 1918 ; Joseph Roths- 
child, 28 Oct., 1918 ; John Robinson, 6 Nov., 
1918 ; James H. Brydges, 24 Dec, 1918. 

No. 77. Bertiford Worsley, 9 Oct., 1918 ; James Reid, 
6 Nov., 1918. 



208 



GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 




Chapter. 

No. 78. William Stanley, 26 June, 1911 ; Sandford 
Tudor, 17 Jan., 1915 ; Wesley W. Kerr, 18 
Dec., 1911 ; William J. Wilson, 1 April, 1918 ; 
Colin Haskett, 1918. 

No. 79. John Francis Scholes, 10 Feb., 1918 ; John 
Jones, 24 Aug., 1918. 

No. 80. Edward William Bauslaugh, 21 Jan., 1918 ; 
Walter Chater, 1 June, 1918 ; Richard 
Bangham, 19 Sept., 1918 ; John Spiers, 19 
Oct., 1918 ; Thomas Leo Chick, 9 Dec, 1918 ; 
Charles W. Fraser (summer, 1918). 

No. 81. S. S. Willison, 16 Oct., 1918 ; George E. Thom- 
son, William N. Palmer (dates not given) ; 
George F. Durker, Nov., 1918. 

No. 82. Thos. H. Teetheway, 9 July, 1918 ; Ray Bell, 
30 Oct., 1918 ; J. G. Bell, 5 Nov., 1918 ; D. 
McLean, 30 Nov., 1918. 

Neil Turner McWilliam, 4 March, 1918. 

Charles A. Farrar, 8 Feb., 1918 ; James Paul 
Barlow, 16 Oct., 1918. 

S. P. Sturgis, Nov., 1918. 

Archibald Fullerton, 3 Jan., 1918 ; R. J. N. 
Pether, 31 May, 1918 ; Robt. James, 1 July, 
1918 ; W. A. McCullouch, 24 Dec, 1918. 

James Donald Creyk, 2 Nov., 1918. 

John McLeod, 25 March, 1918 ; David Hope, 
1914 ; Edward Scafe, 15 Feb., 1913 ; Arthur 
T. Moth, 9 Oct., 1918. 

No. 98. Harold C. Clarke, Feb., 1918 ; Wm. A. McG. 
Brown, May, 1918 ; Clarence M. Marpole, 
July, 1918 ; Arthur Samuel Bourne, Oct., 
1918 ; James Stark, Nov., 1918 ; Matthew 
John Barr, Dec, 1918. 



No. 


83. 


No. 


86. 


No. 


88. 


No. 


90. 


No. 


91. 


No. 


95. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 209 



Dcatfjs 


Chapter. 




No. 


99. 


Frank Niddery, 1 Nov., 1918 ; P. B. Hazleton, 
June, 1918. 


No. 


100. 


E. G. Adams, 11 Aug., 1918 ; A. C. Miller, 19 
Oct., 1918 ; Herbert Axon, 26 Dec., 1918. 


No. 


101. 


John Collie, 14 March, 1918 ; James S. Wilson, 
Feb., 1918 ; Charles Wesley Holgate, 16 Oct., 
1918. 


Xo. 


102. 


W. F. Battersby (date not given) ; James Alex. 
Watson, 4 Nov., 1918 ; George Percival 
Preston, 19 Dec, 1918 ; David Shelbourne, 
2 Dec, 1918. 


No. 


104. 


Allan Stuart Chisholm, 24 Nov., 1918. 


No. 


110. 


Nicholas D. Richards, April, 1918. 


No. 


112. 


S. B. Fell, 18 Feb., 1918 ; Andrew Moffat, 
1 Nov., 1918. 


Xo. 


115. 


Alphaeus S. Lovett, 1918. 


Xo. 


117. 


George Whiting, Aug., 1918 ; Solon Albright, 
Sept., 1918. 


Xo. 


119. 


John Enoc Johnson, 20 March, 1918 ; Hugh 
Webster Pursel, 8 Oct., 1918. 


Xo. 


120. 


Elon Ezra Chipman, 21 April, 1918. 


No. 


121. 


William F. Brown, 17 Nov., 1918 ; Allan 
George King, 25 Oct., 1918 ; John F. Kirk- 
bride, Feb., 1918 ; John A. Kerr, 14 June, 
1918 ; E. E. Meek, 1 June, 1918. 


Xo. 


123. 


Bruce White, 15 Nov., 1918 ; Reuben Rufus 
Martin, 30 Nov., 1917 ; John Alexander 
Macdonald, 8 Oct., 1916. 


' No. 


124. 


David Alexander Chesney, 13 Oct., 1918. 



210 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 




Chapter. 

No. 125. Geo. Alexander Starke, 11 Jan., 1918 ; Andrew 
Miller, 11 Nov., 1918 ; William Leonard 
Kelly, 28 Dec., 1918 ; Edward Elwell, 30 
Jan., 1918. 

No. 127. Alfred Baker, 31 Oct., 1918 ; James Hardy, 8 
Nov., 1918 ; William M. Holt, 9 Nov., 1918. 

No. 128. Charles Holten, 13 Sept., 1918 ; Archibald E. 
Boyle, 8 Oct., 1918 ; J. B. Scott, 24 Dec, 
1918. 

No. 130. William Cassil Cone, June, 1918. 

No. 131. Josias G. Simpson, 16 Dec, 1917 ; John Alex- 
ander McKinnon, 27 Sept., 1918. 

No. 133. Norman Albertson, 20 Oct., 1918. 

No. 135. George C. Coates, 24 Nov., 1918 ; Samuel 
Robinson, 5 Nov., 1918. 

No. 136. Henry Sleigh, 8 June, 1918. 

No. 138. Thomas Edgar Hoar, 15 Sept., 1918 ; Sidney C. 
Johnson, 22 Nov., 1918. 

No. 139. W. M. Leny, S. W. Higley (dates not given). 

No. 141. John Waddell, 3 Jan., 1918. 

No. 145. George Brown, 14 June, 1918 ; E. W. Miller, 9 
Sept., 1918 ; M. H. G. McCarthy, 9 Oct., 
1918 ; H. Schwartz, 11 April, 1918 ; F. W. 
Tisdale, 31 Oct., 1918 ; G. T. Grigsby, 12 
Oct., 1918 ; W. H. Weir, 11 Dec, 1918. 

No. 146. D. D. Campbell, 30 Dec, 1917 ; John Alexander 
Kelly, 11 Oct., 1918 ; John Alexander 
Mitchell, 9 Jan., 1917. 

No. 151. W. B. Wilson, 14 Sept., 1918 ; Simon Scott 
Willison, 16 Oct., 1918. 

No. 152. Joseph Watson (date not given). 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 211 




Chapter. 

No. 153. Will C. Power, 13 Aug., 1918 ; Bernard G. 
Miller, 26 Aug., 1918. 

No. 154. Bertram Bryden Pinkerton, 20 Dec., 1917 ; 
Samuel Henry, 25 Oct., 1918 ; Thos. Milne, 
25 Oct., 1918 ; Edmund S. Ironside, 25 Oct., 
1918. 

No. 156. John King, 22 March, 1918. 

No. 160. James Barclay Brown, 2 Nov., 1918. 

No. 162. John Porter, 13 Jan., 1918 ; William Scramlin, 
25 Jan., 1918 ; Joseph Ed. Caldwell, 30 Oct., 
1918 ; Stephen Findlay, 5 Nov., 1918 ; John 
McFadyen, 7 Dec, 1918. 

No. 164. John Andrews (date not given). 

No. 165. Thomas Brebner, Reginald William Davis, 
Frederick Reinold Fredeen (dates not given) ; 
William Baker McLaggan, 5 May, 1918 ; 
Joseph John Philp, 16 Nov., 1918 ; Harlow 
Victor Tripp, 8 April, 1918. 

No. 166. H. A. Archer, Jan., 1918 ; Jno. King, March, 
1918 ; W. J. Willson, Nov., 1918. 

No. 167. John G. Gidley, 7 June, 1918 ; Wm. Henry 
Whittemore, Oct., 1918 ; John D'Arcy Flynn, 
7th Sept., 1918. 

No. 168. John E. Owens, William John Salter (dates not 
given). 

No. 169. W. H. Harmer, 18 Nov., 1918. 

No. 170. George Elwood Dickin, 14 Nov., 1918. 

No. 173. William Scramlin, Jan., 1918 ; David Lome 
Croston, 25 Feb., 1918 ; William McKay 
Little (New Year, 1918) ; G. M. Meek, May, 
1918 ; George Murdock Davidson, Jan., 1918; 
Arthur Peterson Leonard, 26 Dec, 1918. 



212 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



Beatftf 


Chapter. 






No, 174. 


William Longhurst, 10 Dec, 1918. 




No. 175. 


Charles Israel Kelly, 29 Dec, 1917. 




No. 178. 


Frederick Ball Deacon, 3 June, 1918 
C. Purdy, 15 Feb., 1918 ; Jno. 
Morrison, 7 Nov., 1918. 


; Claude 
Norman 



No. 181. Geoffrey Brichta (date not given) ; Henry M. 
Murdock, 19 Sept., 1918. 

No. 183. John Edward Halsey, 10 Nov., 1918. 

No. 185. John Walters, 21 Nov., 1918 ; Anthony Pat- 
terson Blain, 25 June, 1918. 

No. 187. John Barker Gould, 21 Oct., 1918. 

No. 192. P. P. Campbell, 1 Dec, 1918 ; E. B. Connell, 
10 Aug., 1918 ; H. R. Kelsey, 27 Oct., 1918 ; 
Alex. J. Paterson, 9 Nov., 1918. 

No. 198. A. S. Bowers, 30 March, 1918. 

No. 203. Norman McDougall Creyk, 28 Nov., 1918 ; 
Thomas McCauley, 5 Dec, 1918. 

No. 207. James Hale Roy Stanfield, 10 Nov., 1918. 

No. 209. Johan G. Hallson, 8 Nov., 1918 ; Wm. Glover 
Taylor, 8 Nov., 1918. 

No. 211. John Neville Huffman, 12 Nov., 1918 ; Herbert 
Harold Travis, 2 Nov., 1918. 

No 212. Abraham B. Hashmall, 17 Oct., 1918 ; Charles 
Black, 21 Oct., 1918. 

No. 213. George Murray Dewar, 13 Oct., 1918. 




'•Mine honour let me try : - 

In that I live, and for that will I die." 



Things 'ave transpired which made me learn 
The size and meanin' of the game. 

I did no more than others did, 

I don't know where the change began; 

I started as an average kid, 

I finished as a thinkin' man.— Kipling. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 213 

HONOR ROLL 

"Posterity gives to every man his true honor." 



To the brave and honored Companions who fought, 
as well as to those who died, in achieving a victory for 
the ideals of a brighter and better world in which to 
live. 



"Their honor bound them, and they wished to 
satisfy it." 



To those who fell in battle, or who died from 
wounds, their mortal remains lie not in Canadian soil, 
but to Canada they have bequeathed their memories 
and their glory. 

"On Fame's eternal camping ground 
Their silent tents are spread, 
And glory guards with solemn round 
The bivouac of the dead." 



Subjoined are the names of the Companions reported 
to the office of the Grand Scribe E., as having enlisted 
for Active Overseas Service, as well as showing those 
who have paid the "Supreme Sacrifice" : 

Ancient Frontenac and Cataraqui Chapter, 
No. 1, Kingston, Ont. — R. Ex. Comp. Lieut. -Col. 
W. T. Connell, M.D.; Comps. Capts. A. W. Winnett, 
M.D., George Bawden, J. McD. Mowat (killed in 
action), L. C. Lockett, W. H. Gimblett, M. E. Hall, 
Lieuts. Leonard H. Birkett, James Leckie, Sergt. 
Thomas King, Corp. Edmond H. Birkett, Ptes. W. 
Charles, A. G. Sinclair (killed in action), Frank Andrews, 



214 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

C. W. Dickson, J. C. D. Esterre, S. S. Lumb, Thos. 
McKenzie, L. N. Armstrong, E. R. Moore, H. Mc- 
Ilquham, J. B. Lowery. 

The Hiram Chapter, No. 2, Hamilton, Ont. — Ex. 
Comp. E. E. Linger ; Comps. Sam Cridge Troubridge, 

C. A. McBride, A. P. Whitney, Wm. Brine, Alex. 
Barclay, John Campbell, S. L. Eisenhofer, A. J. Mc- 
Vittie, N. D. Stapley (killed in action), Chester S. 
Walters, Gilbert J. Clayton, H. J. Gilbert, Frank A. 
Muir, Charles E. Mawson, S. T. Tribute, James Varley, 
B. F. Varley, J. K. Cross, Robert Clark, D. W. Fonger, 
A. E. Hahnan, T. A. James, W. G. H. Jones, Geo. E. 
Louth, Geo. R. Low, Geo. H. Nicholson, H. Stroud. 

St. John's Chapter, No. 3, London, Ont. — R. Ex. 
Comp. J. H. Wilson; Ex. Comp. A. E. Somerville; 
Comps. A. W. Kelley, C. G. Carlton, H. J. Stephens, 
M.D., A, R. Skelton, J. E. Middleton, J. J. L. Ardiel, 
J. Hart, J. R. Croden, J. Kelt, C. W. Thurling, R. A. W. 
Carter, C. Wickerson, E. A. Cooper, G. W. Renton, 
J. W. Peart, Dr. E. Seaborn, H. W. Kemp, W. H. 
Robinson. 

St. Andrew and St. John Chapter, No. 4. To- 
ronto, Ont. — Comps. Major Wm. Baillie, Capts. E. A. 
Grant, W. E. Struthers, J. E. Thompson, B. G. Stephen- 
son, Brig.-Major A. C. Lewis, Lieuts. B. J. Miller, H. 
Taylor, Q.M. Sergt. W. S. Jackson, Sergts. 
A. W. Wardill, George Cameron, Sapper George 
Chapman (killed in action, May 31st, 1917), Corp. 

D. Arnot, Gunners W. H. Stark, W. J. Cole. 

St. George's Chapter, No. 5, London, Ont. — 
Comps. Lt.-Cols. H. L. Milligan, D.S.O., 18th Batt.; 
Dr. C. H. Reason, R.A.M.C.; Major H. R. J. Sawyer, 
142nd Batt.; Capts. Dr. L. H. Douglas, R.A.M.C.; 
Dr. Chas. E. McMahon, R.A.M.C; Dr. F. H. Bowen, 
R.A.M.C.; F. D. Millar, C.A.S.; Lieut. M. Percival, 
7th M.R.; Quar.-M.-Sgts. J. G. Green, C.S.H., H. W. 
Burrows, C.A.M.C.; Quar.-M. H. J. Bennett, 142nd 
Batt.; Quar.-M. Sergt. C. H. Ward, No. 3, C.S.H. 
(killed in action), Sergt. A. P. Alford, 1st Can. Contg. ; 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 215 

Ptes. H. A. Dowell, C.M.R. (wounded), C. E. Furness, 
15th C.H., Gabriel McAllister, 134th Batt. (killed in 
action), H. W. Clark, 142nd Batt., Geo. H. Bennett, 
C.A.M.C, R. R. S. Bloom, 25th Batt., Chas. McGeary, 
Can. G. Hosp. (killed in action), R. W. Earrith, No. 3 
St. Hosp., Jas. Lyttle, 134th Batt. ; Sapper 
R. W. Reid, C.A.M.C; Pte. W. J. Reid, 142nd Batt., 
and Comps. A. A. Cooper, Aviation Corps, Dr. C. C. 
Ross, Chas. Griffiths, A. E. Bending, F. H. Kettle, 
M. D. Hambly, A. W. McVicker, W. H. Robinson, 
J. R. Craig, G. L. Hicks, J. E. Stafford, J. R. Stewart, 
M. H. Lee, John Young, W. C. Cross. 

St. John's Chapter, No. 6, Hamilton, Ont. — 
Ex. Comp. Major J. W. Bell, Comps. Major J. Chis- 
holm; Capts. H. C. Treneman, G. D. Farmer; Lieuts. 

E. S. Palmer, H. R. Stares, J. G. Tait ; Sergts. A. V. 
Sutton, C. R. Fressenden, H. Wolstenholme, A. Woosey, 

F. Robins ; Ptes. A. H. Noble, A. Dodds, F. Lawrence, 
J. C. Smith, J. G. Duns, A. C. Pearce, H. O. Spencer, 
T. Hainsworth, Z. H. Barnard, A. C. Beckley, W. J. 
Clark, W. E. Chaloner, W. R. B. Chaloner, F. L. 
Britton, Geo. Sholter (killed in action), Wm. Roussell, 
Comp. F. H. Baker, H. E. Hinderliter. 

The Moira Chapter, No. 7, Belleville, Ont. — 
Comps. Capts. Dr. Perry Gladstone Goldsmith, William 
Henry Hudson (killed in action, 8th Oct., 1916), Dr. 
Henry S. Clapp, William Stuart ; Lieut. William C. 
McGuines (died at Montreal while waiting to go over- 
seas, 11th Dec, 1916), Charles M. Sprague, James 
Hopert McGuire, William E. Schuester, Wm. John 
Cook, Thomas Richard Dands, Philip Henry Wills, 
Rev. John Alex. Petrie, William A. Shaw (killed in 
action, April, 1918), Claude Wallace. 

King Solomon's Chapter, No. 8, Toronto, Ont. — 
R. Ex. Comp. Lieut.-Col. D. A. Clark, M.D.; Comps. 
Major H. S. Cooper, Capts. R. A. Donald, W. A. Child, 
Francis Francis, Jr., Jas E. Brown, A. S. Pearson, 
Lieuts. W. C. Gowland, Jos. H. Hughes, John Sharp, 
Wm. G. Fairbanks, Harry E. Gee, T. E. Bowman, S. N. 
Francis, Elgin Wetherell, Geo. J. Blackmore, Alex. S. 



216 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Elliott, Sub. Lieut. Arthur E. Mandy, Q.M. Sergt. 
J. V. Conroy, Sergt. Major E. G. Fry, Sergts. Leonard 
Jaquiss, F. W. Tetley, E. W. Barber, Fred W. Burns, 
Corp. Arthur H. Smith, Ptes. W. H. Bateson (killed in 
France), R. J. Coley, Horace N. Carr, Geo. Burroughs- 
ford ; Comps. S. G. Tinker, R. V. W. Ainley, F. J. 
Griffiths, Ernest J. Wilson, Melville J. Young, Hy. E. 
Herbert, G. S. McArthur, Roland Toner (Capt. U.S.A.), 
H. J. Burns, Hy. E. Herbert, Geo. S. M. Arthur, W. E. 
Logan. 

Wawanosh Chapter, No. 15, Sarnia, Ont. — 
Comps. Lieut. -Col. R. I. Towers ; Capts. W. A. 
Henderson, M.D. (dropped dead six weeks after re- 
turning from front), Malcolm MacKenzie ; Lieut. 
Harry Beresford ; Andrew Mcintosh (killed in action 
17th Sept., 1916), Walter Palmer, Thos. W. Wright 
(killed in action), Hubert L. Baird. 

Carleton Chapter, No. 16, Ottawa, Ont. — 
Comps. L. E. Allen, S. M. Rogers, T. H. Picton, F. H. 
Honeywell, F. M. Mix, E. E. Hooper, L. F. Jackson, 
T. H. Kenny, H. L. Langdon, E. J. McCleery, J. A. 
McColm, P. C. McGillivray, D. J. McMinn, E. A. 
Oliver, J. F. Roy, C. C. Sheldon, J. M. Skuce, J. H. 
Summers, A. H. Thoburn, A. H. Wheeler. 

Oxford Chapter, No. 18, Woodstock, Ont. — 
Comps. J. B. Jupp, M.D., J. Carruthers (killed in action, 
6 April, 1918). 

Mount Moriah Chapter, No. 19, St. Catharines, 
Ont.— V. Ex. Comp. Lieut.-Col. J. S. Campbell ; Ex. 
Comp. Lieut.-Col. F. C. McCordick ; Comps. Major 
W. Hamilton Merritt, Capt. Henry B. Burgoyne. 

Mount Horeb Chapter, No. 20, Brantford, 
Ont. — Comps. Edward McDonald (killed in action), 
David Miller, Thomas Anderson, Samuel Seago, George 
Bloomfleld, Albert E. Faulkner (killed in action). 

Grenville Chapter, No. 22, Prescott, Ont. — 
Comps. Herbert Tripp, Leonard F. Jamieson (drowned 
while on active service, 27 June, 1918). 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 217 

Ezra Chapter, No. 23, Simcoe, Ont. — R. Ex. 
Comp. Surgeon W. A. Mcintosh ; Ex. Comps. Lieut. - 
Col. L. F. Aiken, Capt. A. H. Paulin ; Comp. Lieut. 
Walter B. Durward. 

Tecumseh Chapter, No. 24, Stratford, Ont. — 
Ex. Comps. T. A. Voyce, John A. Kennedy; Comps. W. 
C. Bradshaw, T. G. Delamere, H. J. Coghill, J. L. 
Youngs, Alex. Cameron, J. C. Stabler, A. H. Monteith, 
W. Hayter, James Low (killed in action), James Daniel 
Dempsey (died prisoner in Germany). 

St. Mark's Chapter, No. 26, Trenton, Ont. — 
Comps. Dr. H. V. Malone, A. E. Bywater, R. C. Titus, 
O. G. Alyea, J. L. McLean, J. H. Sills, Wm. Ingham. 

Manitou Chapter, No. 27, Collingwood, Ont. — 
Ex. Comp. T. E. Hawkins; Comps. Major S. McClel- 
land, Lieut. W. D. T. Atkinson, Sergt. -Major J. 
Johnston, Ptes. Ernest Walker, J. W. Rose, F. A. 
Nettleton, Roy Vanzant, F. Loughlin. 

Pentalpha Chapter, No. 28. Oshawa, Ont. — 
Comp. R. Cecil Cowan. 

McCallum Chapter, No. 29, Dunnville, Ont. — 
Comps. E. S. Baxter, J. P. Cowles, C. A. M. Thrush, 
Chester J. Martindale. 

Huron Chapter, No. 30, Goderich, Ont. — Ex. 
Comp. Major H. C. Dunlop ; Comps. Majors C. E. 
Sale (killed in action, France, January 17th, 1916), E. 
N. Lewis; R. Ex. Comp. Capt. W. F. Gallow, M.D., 
Lieut. A. G. Nisbett (killed in action, France, April 
10th, 1917), Ptes. W. L. Yule, C. W. Garthwaite, J. B. 
McKay, A. M. Maclnnes, Driver J. Alex. Straiton. 

Prince Edward Chapter, No. 31, Picton, Ont. — 
Comps. Lieut.-Col. Milton K. Adams, Major Bernard 
R. Hepburn, Capts. Sidney J. Gilmour, Ex. Comp. 
G. W. Morden, Comps. Dr. Chas. A. Publow, Lieuts. 
D. S. Ainsworth, Harry Reymes, Pte. William Gordon 
Werden (wounded). 



218 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Waterloo Chapter, No. 32, Galt, Ont. — Ex. 
Comps. Lieut. -Col. A. J. Oliver, Majors J. N. McRae, 
Harvey L. Willson, D. McLennan, Capt. G. H. Charl- 
ton, Lieut. John James Campbell (killed in action, 
October 26th, 1917), Gunner J. M. Philp. 

Signet Chapter, No. 34, Barrie, Ont. — R. Ex. 
Comp. A. Cowan ; Ex. Comps. Col. J. B. McPhee, 
Lieut.-Col. D. W. B. Spry, Major Jno. Preece, Capts. 
H. E. Jory, A. P. Potter, J. C. Miller, Lieut. R. W. 
Stewart ; Comps. Dr. C. C. Gibson, Sergts. B. W. Boyd, 
Frank Knight, W. C. Towers, H. M. Jupp, Geo. E. 
Madden, S. G. Smith, John Ochs, John Oakes. 

Keystone Chapter, No. 35, Whitby, Ont. — Ex. 
Comp. Major G. W. P. Every ; Comps. Capt. Dr. 
James Moore, Sergts. R. M. Deverell, E. G. Hazell, 

F. W. Jones, S. D. Dudley, Sapper Robt. Irwin, Pte. 
Fred Dowswell. 

Corinthian Chapter, No. 36, Peterborough, 
Ont. — Comps. Cols. R. M. Dinnistoun, R. J. Stuart, 
Lieut.-Col. C. H. Ackerman, Majors S. T. Medd, R. P. 
Watt, Keith G. Lech, Capts. Geo. Brisco, J. M. Bygott, 
Dr. A. D. McPherson, Lieuts. Dr. G. S. Cameron, 
A. R. Laing, A. T. Lefevre, Dr. V. H. McWilliams, 

G. K. Rackham, Claude Rogers. Q.M. Sergt. R. G. 
Cottrell, Sergts. Hurrell Dodds, D. H. Downie, D. A. 
Loomis, J. Fred Reed, R. J. Matchett, Rev. J. R. 
Bonner, Gunner W. T. Regan, Ptes. W. A. Noble, 
W. D. Parker, D. Carlisle. 

Victoria Chapter, No. 37, Port Hope, Ont. — V. 
Ex. Comp. Lieut.-Col. Robert Wallace Smart, Major 
Alfred H. C. Long, Comp. Pte. Norman L. Yelland, 
Arthur E. Choate, Wilfred Croft, John J. Jeffrey, 
Morgan Carry. 

Guelph Chapter, No. 40, Guelph, Ont. — Comps. 
Sergts. Peter Charlton, George M. Binks, Pte. Harry 
Page, John G. Grieve, Wm. J. Elliot. 

Harris Chapter, No. 41, Ingersoll, Ont. — 
Comps. Jas. V. Neal (killed in action), J. R. Beaton, 
Vincent Wilson (on H.M.S. Niobe). 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 219 

Mount Sinai Chapter, No. 44, Napanee, Ont. — 
Ex. Comp. G. P. Reiffenstein ; Comps. E. W. Rathbun, 
C. M. Stratton, S. D. Wagar, W. H. Roberts, Dr. E. 
M. Horton, Seaborn Emsley, W. W. Cambridge. 

Excelsior Chapter, No. 45, Colborne, Ont. — 
Comps. Ethelbert Elijah Latta, Charles P. Brown, 
Thomas B. Hewson. 

St. James Chapter, No. 46, St. Mary's, Ont. — 
Comps. Herbert Crawford Sharp, Albert Edward 
Palmer, Walter Leslie, Norman Ewan Raleigh, Gordon 
Ellis, Oliver John McNaughton. 

Wellington Chapter, No. 47, Chatham, Ont. — 
Comps. E. N. Fremlin, W. N. Gallougher (killed, March 
20, 1915), H. A. G. Willoughby, R. W. Angus, H. S. 
Clements, Rev. R. S. W. Howard, Alex. McDougal, 
Chas. A. Praugley, John Riddell, Neil Smith, H. D. 
Smith, W. M. Taylor, Geo. W. Welsh (killed in action). 

St. John's Chapter, No. 48, Cobourg, Ont. — Ex. 
Comps. Lieut. -Col. John W. Odell, Lieut. Dr. John 
R. Irvine ; Comp. Gunner W. S. Norris. 

Prince Rupert Chapter, No. 52, Winnipeg, Man. 
—Comps. John Barter, Walter Jeames, Russell M. 
McLeod, Dr. Robert M. Simpson, Charles S. Shipman, 
George B. Williams, George A. Williams, Henry S. R. 
Warwick, J. A. McTaggart, A. McCharles, D. William- 
son, E. A. Shaw, J. S. Laycock, G. F. Stableford, L. H. 
King, J. M. Beckett, C. B. Handcock, D. King, H. J. 
Watson, F. T. Cadham, S. L. Barrowclough, D. Mc- 
Lean, G. G. Miller, E. J. Simon, J. A. Acheson, D. 
Brown, W. J. Bell, J. M. Suthe, A. W. Morley, C. H. 
Simpson, Alex. Mclver (killed in action), L. R. Cole. 

Bruce Chapter, No. 53, Petrolia, Ont. — Comps. 
John Charles Reid, John Wesley Hall. 

Palestine Chapter, No. 54, St. Thomas, Ont.— 
R. Ex. Comp. E. W. Honsinger (Dentist); Comps. Fred 
Guest, M.D., W. A. Burns (Dentist), J. M. Nettleton, 
M.D., W. G. Davies (killed, 26th April, 1916), W. H. 



220 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Bailey, E. W. Ramey, H. E. Tylar, T. H. May 
(killed, 17th April, 1916), R. J. Anderson 
(killed in action, 8th August, 1918), James 
Urquhart, C. L. Spittler, G. M. Baldwin, J. R. McNeil, 
H. S. Chapman, Ira T. P. Snelgrove (killed in action, 
5th October, 1918). 

Niagara Chapter, No. 55, Niagara, Ont. — Comp. 
H. S. O'Melia. 

Georgian Chapter, No. 56, Owen Sound, Ont. — 
Comps. Capts. D. R. Dobie, J. H. Brownlees, Ptes. 
Willard Malone, E. E. Miller. 

King Hiram Chapter, No. 57, Port Colborne, 
Ont. — Comps. Donald McNevin, Alfred Wheable. 

Pembroke Chapter, No. 58, Mattawa, Ont. — 
Comps. Lieuts. Wm. H. Cowper, G. Clapperton (killed), 
Ptes. R. K. Wilson, R. J. Leach, Wm. Smith, H. T. 
Lloyd. 

Sussex Chapter, No. 59, Brockville, Ont. — 
Comps. Capt. Herbert H. Edwards, Albert L. Kearns, 
David Miles, E. C. H. Moore (killed at Vimy Ridge, 
April 23rd, 1917), Fred L. Barclay, Allan S. Connor. 

Doric Chapter, No. 60, Newmarket, Ont. — 
Comps. Capt. Aubrey Davies, Lieut. T. W. McConkey, 
Ptes. Robert Harrison, Francis L. Morto. 

Granite Chapter, No. 61, Almonte, Ont. — Comp. 
Lieut. Goodwin O. Kemp. 

York Chapter, No. 62, Eglington, Ont. — Comps. 
Capt. G. R. N. Collins, Edward Brown (Royal Aviation 
Corps), Dr. G. Howard, Pte. j. Argue, L. W. Reade, 
J. H. Elliott, Dr. M. M. Crawford. 

Havelock Chapter, No. 63, Kincardine, Ont. — 
Comps. H. L. Collins, M.D., J. G. McLeod, M.D. 

Willson Chapter, No. 64, Welland, Ont. — 
R. Ex. Comp. Col. J. E. Cohoe ; Comps. Col. Donald 
Sharp, Lieut. G. B. Ross, Dr. G. M. Davis, E. D. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 221 

Hooker, W. H. Ogg, Clarence Doan, F. E. McCann, 
Percy Whiffield, P. D. McAllister, Geo. H. Main, Chas. 
S. Bowers, Harry Vanderburg. 

St. Paul's Chapter, No. 65, Toronto, Ont. — Ex. 
Comp. Lieut. -Col. John A. Shaw, D.S.O.; Comps. Cols. 
Wallace Scott, H. A. Bruce, Lieut.-Cols. John T. 
Clarke, D. Douglas Young, A. A. Miller (killed in 
action), Majors W. D. Greer, Geo. M. Higginbotham 
(deceased), W. C. Mitchell, C. C. Wansborough, Fred- 
erick H. Moody, E. W. Wright, A. D. Armour, E. N. 
Armour, P. E. Boyd, H. E. Ridout ; Capts. J. B. Jupp, 
W. E. V. Shaw, J. A. McCollum, W. M. Hargraft, 
Lieuts. J. D. Warren, Hugh L. Hovles (killed in action). 
F. C. Grassick, W. M. Hargraft, R.N.V.R., Q.M. Sergt. 
Chas. S. McCollum, W. T. Anderson. 

The Malloch Chapter, No. 66, Seaforth, Ont. — 
V. Ex. Comp. Major R. S. Hays, Comps. Capt. H. H. 
Hodgins, C. E. Dowding, J. N. Gunn. 

Enterprise Chapter, No. 67, Harriston, Ont. — 
Comps. Major C. E. Livingstone, A. Donaldson, S.C. 
Southgate (killed in action), B. W. Wilson, Horace 
Parker (killed in action). 

Grimsby Chapter, No. 69, Grimsby, Ont. — R. Ex. 
Comp. A. E. Phipps ; Comps. A. E. Kimmons (killed), 
R. T. Johnson, E. S. Johnson, J. E. Scott, W. R. 
Woodland, W. B. Woolverton. 

Grand River Chapter, No. 70, Bracebridge, 
Ont.— Comps. Dr. Peter McGibbon, A.M.C., Thos. S. 
S. Parker, A. F. Butterworth (killed), Stanley Paulin. 

Prince of Wales, No. 71, Amherstburg, Ont. — 
Comp. Hugh Johnson. 

Keystone Chapter, No. 72, Stirling, Ont. — R. 
Ex. Comps. Major H. H. Alger, C.A.M.C, Capt. C. F. 
Walt, C.A.D.C; Comps. Major D. Green, Capts. J. L. 
McLean, J. H. Sills, and W. W. Wallace. 



222 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Beaver Chapter, No. 74, Strathroy, Ont. — 
Comps. Capts. Fred W. Jay and Arthur P. Malone 
(wounded), Comps. Norman F. Newton, Robert R. 
Lloyd, Wm. Campbell (wounded), John White, E. J. 
Hixon. 

St. Clair Chapter, No. 75, Milton, Ont. — Ex. 
Comp. C. E. Robertson (Aviation Corps) ; Comps. 
Capt. A. O. T. Beardmore, N. M. Campbell, B. G. 
Arnold, R. G. Lucas. 

Mount Nebo Chapter, No. 76, Niagara Falls, 
Ont.— Comps. Brig.-Gen. F. W. Hill, Major J. J. 
Harriman, Capts. Fred J. Anderson, D. A. R. Cameron, 
J. W. Bottomley (killed in action in East Africa), A. B. 
Robertson, J. Rothschild, T. T. Birkett, W. P. Lyon. 

Occident Chapter, No. 77, Toronto, Ont. — 
Comps. Majors A. C. Larter, E. G. Switzer ; Capts. 
J. S. Legge, A. McGregor (missing) ; Lieuts. W. D. 
Sprinks, W. H. Sharpe, W. J. Simpson, E. H. 
Jolliffe, J. M. Burden ; Sergts. W. G. B. Guguid 
(prisoner), R. H. Cuthbert W. G. Giles, A. Green, 
S. G. Newdick, A. Ross, A. A. Burridge ; Q.M.-Sergt. 
F. W. Hammett ; Corps. J. Cottrill, W. Haslam, J. G. 
Bell, G. H. Woodburn ; Ptes. H. Carey > H. Hirst, W. F. 
Munroe, H. Dowie, J. Atkinson, F. Hopkinson, F. 
Sheridan (killed in action), C. J. Barker, W. G. Self, 
E. Fraleigh, G. H. Wood, S. W. Gunbridge, J. Clegg, 
Seaman H. J. Newcombe, Alex. Duthie (killed in 
action). 

Minnewawa Chapter, No. 78, Parkhill, Ont. — 
Ex. Comps. Dr. G. W. Racey, D. C. Wilson ; Comps. 
W. D. Brand, Harold J. Glenn. 

Orient Chapter, No. 79, Toronto, Ont. — Ex. 
Comps. Major W. L. Baynes-Reid, Sergt, Major Geo. 
Spademan ; Comps. Majors Alex. Gillies, Wm. C. N. 
Marriott, Capts. W. E. C. McCarthy, A. S. Weiss, 
Frank L. Thompson, Lieuts. A. T. Skill (killed in 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 223 

action), J. McK. Ferguson, Staff-Sergt. C. DeL. Mac- 
Neely, Sergt. Thos. Purchase, Ptes. W. C. Dies, J. J. 
Gallagher, D. J. Williams, Wm. G. Woods, G. L. Val- 
lery, F. G. Russell, O. H. Luke, and Signallers A. H. 
Jones and Geo. B. Paris. 

Ark Chapter, No. 80, Windsor, Ont. — Comps. 
Lieut. -Col. Ernest S. Wigle, Major J. C. Tolmie, Capts. 
Fred Laing Lodge, John F. Reid, Lieuts. Claude Wel- 
lington Pike (killed in action), A. E. Cock, Orville 
Rolfson, Sergt. Stanley Wallace. 

Aylmer Chapter, No. 81, Aylmer, Ont. — Ex. 
Comp. Lieut. Dr. H. L. Douglas ; Comps. Rev. J. M. 
McGillivray (Chaplain), Capt. George Stewart, Lieuts. 
L. F. Clark, G. E. Johnson, Comp. Geo. Ellis. 

Shuniah Chapter, No. 82, Port Arthur, Ont. — 
Comps. Claude Street, Walter Gordon, Alfred Wallace, 
George H. Otto, Charles Wm. McLean, Edwin Shellard, 
Frank Rowe, Fred W. Thorogood, Thos. Plant, A. J. 
Peckett, Rev. C. W. Hedley, Neil Mclver, F. G. 
Loveladv, Dr. J. I. Pratt, R. E. McKenzie, Bro. John 
H. Wilson. 

Ionic Chapter, No. 83, Orangeville, Ont. — R. 
Ex. Comp. Lieut. -Col. J. A. V. Preston ; Ex. Comps. 
R. J. Bennett, Richard Robinson ; Comps. B. E. 
Matthews, W. K. Colbeck, J. E. L. Keyes, T. A. Carson, 
W. F. R. Subbs. 

Lebanon Chapter, No. 84, Wingham, Ont. — Ex. 
Comp. Capt. Adjt. Charles G. Van Stone ; Comp. 

Capt. Dr. George H. Ross. 

• 

Macpherson Chapter, No. 86, Meaford, Ont. — 
Comp. Dr. Joseph Jordan. 

MacNabb Chapter, No. 88, Dresden, Ont. — 
Comps. Majors R. D. Black, Harold G. McVean. 

Golden Chapter, No. 90, Kenora, Ont. — R. Ex. 
Comp. Major Dr. N. Schnarr ; Comps. Lieuts. H. W. 
Echlin, G. C. Hay, F. P. Edwards. A. P. Miller, George 
Kidd; Comps. J. B. L. McDonald, C. G. McLeod, 



224 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

A. T. Fife, J. W. Mackie, A. C. Waugh, P. McVicar, 
C. J. Farr (killed in action), H. T. Britten, H. Dawson, 
A. T. Alterton, J. R. McKenzie, H. C. Barker, Angus 
Stewart, Thomas McGonnachie, G. A. West, H. W. 
Echlin, John McKenzie, H. R. Phipps, T. B. Elliott. 

Antiquity Chapter, No. 91, Toronto, Ont. — 
Comps. Cols. J. A. Currie, R. H. Greer, Capts. A. G. 
Fletcher, Raymond Walker, Sergt. -Majors W. H. 
Grant, G. W. Broughton, Gunners W. Sirrett, J. N. 
Williams, W. R. B. Humphries, Pte. A. H. Green, W. 
Ross, E. C. Hockaday, T. G. Crossan, Geo. Ferguson, 
T. Mitchell (died from wounds), E. J. Taylor, W. G. 
Pink, O. R. Allen, G. A. Finn, Thos. Mathews, C. F. 
Harraden, W. G. Griffith, J. S. Mackey, J. L. Galbraith, 
N. F. Graham, Geo. Ferguson, A. H. Carter, S. L. 
Pearson, C. H. McKinnon, C . F. Rutherford, C. H. 
Schrag, W. F.Biowerman, R. W. Hind. J. H. Robertson, 
T. A. Glover, W. T. Booth, T. A. Hillock (died from 
wounds) . 

Midland Chapter, No. 94. Lindsay, Ont. — 
Comps. Lieut. -Col. J. "[• H. Fee ; Majors J. F. Carew, 
Dr. W. J. Brown ; Capts. Dr. J. McCullock, Rev. Jas. 
Wallace, Wm. Warren; Lieuts. C. L. Davidson, D. T. 
Elliott, A. T. Porter; Sergt. Stanley McLean, Pte. 
Cecil H. Hughes. 

Tuscan Chapter, No. 95, Sudbury, Ont. — R. Ex. 
Comp. Surgeon Major R. H. Arthur ; Ex. Comp. 
Lieut.-Col. W. J. Cressey ; Comps. Major D. M. 
Brodie, Lieuts. W. R. Spencer, H. Whitehead, Corp. 
H. H. McNairney, Pte. H. G. Shephard, H. M. Tor- 
rington, C.*A. Durkee, J. A. Cronk. 

Vancouver Chapter, No. 98, Vancouver, B.C. — 
Comps. Col. J. Duff Stuart ; Major Jas. Sclater; Capts. 
Frederick Bayliss, G. M. Endacott ; R. Ex. Comp. 
Lieut. J. H. Roaf ; Ex. Comps. Donald M. Moore 
(killed in action), Rev. A. L. Burch ; Comps. Ptes. 
George P. Bowie (killed in action), J. A. Fraser, C. E. 
King, E. S. Morgan, R. McMahon, Frank Smith 
(killed in action), G. A. Watson, T. E. L. Taylor, H. 
W. Pyatt, H. G. D. Kemp, J. Hucheon, R. D. Thomp- 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 225 

son, A. J. Banham, E. A. S. Chowne, A. U. de Pencier, 
N. M. Hall, M. McPhatter, G. H. McKay, W. C. 
Smaill, C. S. Thicke, P. L. King, E. P. Dennis, J. M. 
MacMillan, C. Marpole, Thomas Proctor (missing). 

Keystone Chapter, No. 99, Portage La Prairie, 
Man. — Ex. Comp. H. A. Gordon ; Comps. A. C. 
Williams (killed in action), F. G. Taylor, C. D. Mc- 
Pherson, A. L. Hamilton, A. J. Pollitt, Alex. Campbell, 
J. P. McKinnon, G. R. Milne. 

St. Lawrence Chapter, No. 100, Brockville, 
Ont. — Comps. Lieut. -Col. Charles T. Wilkinson, Majors 
Dr. F. B. Carron, A. W. Grey, Capt. C. E. McLean, 
Sergt. H. H. Vance, Ptes. J. E. Cleland, J. W. McEwan, 
C. A. Donaldson. 

Corinthian Chapter, No. 101, Boissevain, Man. 
— Ex. Comp. John R. Hutchinson ; Comps. Alf. 
Dusenbury, A. D. Anderson. 

Algonquin Chapter, No. 102, Sault Ste. Marie, 
Ont. — Comps. A. H. Hugill, J. E. McLurg (wounded 
and prisoner of war), Joseph Hobbs, C. M. McCreath, 
R. J. Aitkin, W. D. Battersby (killed in action), J. J. 
Carrick, Don. M. Hogarth, J. S. McCay (killed in 
action). 

St. John's Chapter, No. 103, North Bay, Ont. — 
Comps. G. P. Vollmer, E. C. Shepherd (killed in action). 

White Oak Chapter, No. 104, Oakville, Ont. — 
Comps. Arthur V. Stanton, S. C. Morden, J. H. Hawkes. 

Warkworth Chapter, No. 110, Warkworth, 
Ont. — Comp. J. N. Richards, M.D., Major J. Macoun, 
Dr. F. A. Aylesworth, Dr. J. A. Blezard, James O. 
Grieve. 

St. John's Chapter, No. 112, Morrisburg, Ont. — 
Comps. Fred A. Nash, Herbert A. Fink. 

Covenant Chapter, No. 113, Cornwall, Ont. — 
Comps. Col. H. A. Morgan, Capts. F. J. Cameron, 
S. M. Gray, Lieut. F. D. Raymond, F. J. Robinson, 
A. McKerchar. 



226 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

BONNECHERE CHAPTER, No. 114, RENFREW, ONT. 

Comps. Capts. Henry J. Airth, P. S. MacLaren, Alex. 
C. Young, Lieut. Thomas D. Campbell, Sergt. R. G. 
Johnson, Gunner James P. Morrison, John A. 
Delahey, J. T. McCagherty. 

Brant Chapter, No. 115, Paris,. Ont.— V. Ex. 
Comp. L. Lapierre ; Comps. H. P. James, S. Knill, H. 
H. Fair, W. G. McCosh (killed in action). 

Maple Chapter, No. 116, Carleton Place, Ont. 
— Comps. W. Heber McCallum, Walter Ross Mcll- 
quham, James Ernest Williams. 

Kitchener Chapter, No. 117, Kitchener, Ont. — 
Comps. Col. W. M. O. Lochead ; Capts. A. Lockhardt, 
W. H. Gregory ; Lieuts. H. C. Snyder (killed in action), 
S. Albright (killed in action), Dr. J. J. Walters ; Corp. 
Benjamin Burnham, Signaller George E. Harper, Pte. 
Wm. Uffelman, Comps. Thos. D. Forsythe, Dr. George 
Eric Chapman. 

King Cyrus Chapter, No. 119, Leamington, 
Ont.— Ex. Comp. Capt. R. Hillier, M.D.; Comps. W. 
A. Burgess, M.D., Russell J. Pearce. 

Kootenay Chapter, No. 120, Kaslo, B.C. — 
Comps. Col. W. J. H. Holmes, A. A. Taylor, Malcolm 
McLeod. 

Wascana Chapter, No. 121, Regina, Sask. — 
Comps. Lieut. -Col. R. A. Carman ; Majors R. H. 
Read, I. McAra, G. H. Marsh, F. J. James ; Capts. L. 
V. Kerr, D. S. Tamblyn, J. F. Anderson, F. G. Arnold, 
J. A. Cullum (killed in action) ; Lieut. J. C. Meade, 
Sergt.-Major W. F. Whebell, Ptes. G. S. Bealson 
(killed in action), J. Macklen, A. J. Dines, E. E. Meek 
(killed in action). 

Rossland Chapter, No. 122, Rossland, B.C. — 
Comps. A. B. Chandler, C. H. MacDougall (killed in 
action), P. W. Brady, Geo. E. Foster. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 227 

Nelson Chapter, No. 123, Nelson, B.C. — Comps. 
Capts. H. F. V. Meurling, C. J. Archer ; Lieut. L. B. 
Reynolds, Company Sergt. -Major John Teague ; 
Sergts. E. E. Robinson, Claud L. Wales (killed in 
action) ; Ptes. J. A. MacDonald (killed in action), 
Fred Nicholls, R. R. Martin (killed in action), M. F. 
Shaw. 

Westminster Chapter, No. 124, New West- 
minster, B.C. — Comps. Major V. L. Marsh ; Capts. 
M. J. Knight, J. W. Carmichael, Dr. A. L. McQuarrie, 
Dr. Robt. McCaffrey ; Ex. Comps. Lieuts. D. C. 
Tuck, R. Cullen, L. M. Richardson; Comps. Lieuts. J. 
H. Diamond, D. E. Munn (died from wounds, April 
18th, 1917), D. B. Martyn, P. F. Collin, F. J. Mac- 
Kenzie, Dr. T. H. Levey ; Ptes. Samuel Giles, H. C. 
Fisher, W. H. Griffin, F. J. Brandrith, J. B. McCul- 
lough, H. Lonsdale, T. A. Clegg, H. Huston, C. S. 
Feriss, H. Murgatroyd, Granby Farrant. 

Rocky Mountain Chapter, No. 125, Cranbrook*, 
B.C. — Comps. Capts. W. Halsall, E. A. Mallandaine ; 
R. Ex. Comps. Lieuts. T. H. Banfield, E. W. Connolly ; 
Comps. Sergts. T. B. Stark, L. T. Grace, Corp. G. 
Vigne, Ptes. A. C. Bell, H. B. Carter, A. Empson. 

Keystone Chapter, No. 127, Nanaimo, B.C. — 
Comps. Lieut. H. R. Jepson (died of wounds at Vimy 
Ridge), Sergt. Charles Dickinson ; Ex. Comp. Corp. 
Richard Isherwood ; Comp. A. K. MacDonall. 

Revelstoke Chapter, No. 128, Revelstoke, 
B.C.— Comps. Capts. J. H. M. D. Hamilton, W. W. 
Foster ; Lieuts. T. E. L. Talor, M. P. Lane (killed in 
action) ; Ptes. J. A. Campbell, Thomas Hope, J. S. H. 
Munro, T. H. Reade, T. C. Rea, J. D. Nicholdson. 

Chantry Chapter, No. 130, Southampton, Ont. 
— R. Ex. Comp. Dr. P. J. Scott ; Comps. Major George 
Nelson, D. D. McLeod, A. M. Christian (killed in 
action), J. E. Williscroft. 

Amabel Chapter, No. 131, Wiarton, Ont. — 
Comps. Ptes. E. F. Jackson, J. E. Grassett, J. A. 
McKinnon. 



228 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Leeds Chapter, No. 132, Gananoque, Ont. — Ex. 
Comp. Norman R. Gardiner; Comps. Morrison Acton, 
W. D. Wood. 

St. Francis Chapter, No. 133, Smith's Falls, 
Ont. — Comps. Capt. Thomas A. Kidd, Lieut. W. H. 
Code, Comp. G. W. Reaburn. 

King Darius Chapter, No. 134, Cannington, 
Ont. — Comps. Major H. S. Cameron, Lieuts. Chas. 
G. Cowan, Howard Keslick. 

Succoth Chapter, No. 135, Uxbridge, Ont. — R. 
Ex. Comp. Col. David A. Clark ; Comps. Lieut. 
Delbert Evans, Gunner W. Stanley Norris. 

King Edward Chapter, No. 136, Neepawa, Man. 
— R. Ex. Comp. William Young ; Comps. J. W. 
Bradley, W. S. Gordon, Arthur Booth (died from 
wounds received in action), Fred W. Alguire, James A. 
Fraser, R. Woodiwiss, Hubert Foster, Harold K. 
Newcombe. 

Shekinah Chapter, No. 138, Toronto, Ont. — 
Comps. Lieut. -Cols. J. G. Wright, C. H. Gilmour, Dr. 
A. Evans ; Capts. D. Hillman, W. A. McMaster 
Lieut, F. W. Prior, Sergt. -Majors W. Worthington, 
T. Kenney ; Corp. A. Turriff, Sapper H. Wellwood, 
Ptes. J. Barber, M. R. Fydell, F. B. Hartney, P. Russell. 

St. Andrew's Chapter, No. 139, Havelock, Ont. 
— Comps. W. J. Andrews, Clarence Copp. 

Fort William Chapter, No. 140, Fort William, 
Ont.— Comps. Col. E. R. Wayland, Majors J. E. 
Swinburne, Milton Francis, R. H. Neeland ; Ex. 
Comps. Lieuts. E. D. Higginbottom, G. G. Rooker, 
C. E. Watkins, Corp. E. H. North ; Comps. Ptes. 
W. J. Huston (killed in action), D. Mans, John A. 
Ross, Hector McDonald, E. C. Coslett, B. P. Robinson 
(killed), John E. Spohr (killed), E. J. Dure (motor 
boat), A. E. Griffin, H. S. Hancock, R. G. Gilleride, 
H. I. Orr. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 229 

Keystone Chapter, No. 141, Brandon, Man. — 
Comps. Lieut. -Col. D. W. Beaubier ; Majors C. J. 
Whillier, A. Havard, W. W. Donaldson ; Capts. T. S. 
Finn, F. J. R. Wichelo, W. G. Hopper, A. F. Campbell ; 
Lieuts. C. J. Mussell (killed in action, September, 1916), 
W. J. McTaggart, W. J. Moisley ; Q.M.-Sergt. H. M. 
Kerr. 

Cyrus Chapter, No. 142, Cumberland, B.C. — 
Comp. John Milligan. 

Glengarry Chapter, No. 143, Maxville, Ont. — 
Comps. Capt. Finley Munroe, M.D., Robert R. Hunter. 

Presque Isle Chapter, No. 144, Brighton, Ont. 
— Comps. Clarence T. Lapp, Percy F. Webb. 

The St. Patrick Chapter, No. 145, Toronto, 
Ont. — Ex. Comp. Maj.-Sur.-Gen. G. S. Ryerson ; 
Comps. Col. W. J. Neill ; Majors H. J. Dingman, 
Thomas Gibson, W. H. Hedges ; Capts. G. H. Doherty, 
Dr. A. G. Fletcher, Rev. J. D. Morrow, R. Walker, Jr., 
A. S. Hamilton, W. N. Smillie ; Lieuts. L. H. Meyer, 
Lou F. Scholes ; Sergts. Fred. C. Baker, B. O. Furey, 
W. J. McDonald, Thomas Piper ; Lance-Corp. T. F. 
Sylvester ; Ptes. J. Farrington, A. G. Grant, J. K. 
Gillies, J. A. Graydon, A. R. McMullen, G. C. Mc- 
Curdy, J. Procter, W. A. Tuxford, Edward Reed, 
Robert A. Shaw, and Comps. A. T. Grisgby, C. M. 
Ingall, T. F. Ranee, A. J. VanNostrand. 

Bernard Chapter, No. 146, Listowel, Ont. — 
Comp. John E. Lang. 

Atwood Chapter, No. 149, Rainy River, Ont. — 
Ex. Comp. G. Ross ; Comps. A. P. McDonald, J. H. 
Wilson, Wm. McKenzie. 

London Chapter, No. 150, London, Ont. — Comps. 
John A. Barnhill, George T. E. Martin, J. H. C. Wood- 
ward, Geo. White, John L. Richmond, John H. Town- 
end, F. A. Taylor, E. M. McLean, George T. Studd, 
A. J. Cross, F. C. Hodges, R. H. Berry, Chester F. 
Price, F. M. Brickenden, E. R. Dingle, F. R. Shore, 
Edgar K. Bragg. 



230 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Laurentian Chapter, No. 151, Pembroke,. Ont. — 
Comps. Geo. H. Dunbar, Alex. J. Millar, Geo. H. Ross, 
W. F. Waddington. 

Alberton Chapter, No. 152, Fort Frances, Ont. 
— Comps. Lieut. -Col. David C. McKenzie; Capt. Colin 
Russel ; Lieuts. P. A. Wright (died from injuries), Colin 
F. McGregor, L. H. Tucker (killed in action), James 
Atkins, R. Eldridge, G. A. Stethem. 

Sombra Chapter, No. 153, Sombra, Ont. — Comps. 
Capt. S. P. S. Cathcart, Pte. B. G. Miller 

Klondike Chapter, No. 154, Dawson, Y.T. — 
Comps. Lieut. -Col. Alfred Thompson, Capt. George 
Black, John Watt (killed in action, October 4th, 1915), 
Francis L. Lindblad, Malcolm McKinnon, John F. 
McLennan, William G. Radford. 

Ancaster Chapter, No. 155, Ancaster, Ont. — Ex. 
Comps. Major G. D. Farmer, Joseph G. Dunns, Comps. 
A. S. Armes, Wm. W. Irwin, John Pickard, H. Lee Begg. 

Avondale Chapter, No. 156, Hartney, Man. — R. 
Ex. Comp. J. C. W. Reid; Comps. John Grant Rattray, 
Hubert Alexander Croll, Amslie Lunham Young, 
Arthur Biggins, Geo. T. Maitland, Fred A. Tedford, 
Chas. G. Webb, A. B. Chapman, A. L. Johnston, J. E. 
Underbill. 

Okanagan Chapter, No. 157, Vernon, B.C. — 
Comps. Majors R. J. Mutrie (killed in action, March, 
1916), J. T. Bardolph, Q.M.-Sergt. F. Barnes, Norman 
M. Currie, Edgar H. Crawford. 

Prince Albert Chapter, No. 160, Prince Albert, 
Sask. — R. Ex. Comp. Capt. Adjt. Garnet Coombs ; 
Comps. Frank A. Creighton, James H. Lindsay, John 
P. Lyle, Wm. McDonald, John E. L. Richmond, 
William R. Thomson. 

Madoc Chapter, No. 161, Madoc, Ont. — Comps. 
Capts. Arthur B. Whytock, M.D., E. C. A. Crawford, 
M.D.; Lieuts. Wilfred Smith and R. M. Sarles and 
Harold H. Johnson, Charles Edward Wright, Auberon 
Thomas James. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 231 

Moose Jaw Chapter, No. 162, Moose Jaw, Sask. 
— Comps. Dr. R. H. Smith, Dr. Wm. Brown, Walter 
W. DeRosseter (killed in action), Herbert Snell, Alva 

C. Sipes, Edwin C. Scatchard, Donald C. Thompson, 
Henry H. Bamford, Julian P. Meyers. 

The Beaches Chapter, No. 163, Toronto, Ont. — 
R. Ex. Comp. Dr. D. A. Clark ; Comps. H. A. Perkins, 
W. C. Graham, George J. Stanley (killed in action, 
November 20th, 1916), R. T. Griffin, Chas. Legge. 

Lorne Chapter, No. 164, West Lorne, Ont. — 
Comp. Joseph Melbourne Kelly. 

Saskatoon Chapter, No. 165, Saskatoon, Sask. — 
Comps. Lieut.-Col. H. E. Munro, Major G. G. Morris, 
Capts. R. Ex. Comp. G. A. Munro ; Comps. T. W. 
Fawcett, Rev. P. W. Pullinger, A. E. St. Laurent, G. W. 
McFarlane, R. Davis (killed in action), Lieuts. Ivan 
Tinkees (killed in action), D. Macdonald (killed in 
action), Arthur Farquhar (Aviation Corp) ; Sergts. F. 
Reeves, D. Douglas, Ptes. T. Yorath, Ruben Smith, 
Geo. E. L. Armstrong, F. G. Tanner, E. G. Greenway, 
Wm. E. Arscott, Wm. McLaggan (died, May 5, 1918), 
Harold V. Tripp (killed in action), T. W. Sanderson, 
E. H. C. Cook, Alne C. Cameron, A. J. E. Sumner ; 
Comps. H. Bond, Chas. Barnes, J. C. K. Langford, 
Victor Michie, N. P. Olsen, Thos. Simpson, F. W. D. 
Thompson, W. Todd, F. K. Wilson, W. A. Wright. 

Moose Mountain, No. 166, Arcola, Sask. — ■ 
Comp. Lieut. H. A. Archer (killed in action). 

KlCHIKEWANA CHAPTER, No. 167, MIDLAND, ONT. 

— R. Ex. Comp. Major Dr. R. Raikes ; Comp. Major 

D. L. McKeand (wounded) ; Ex. Comp. Capt. Dr. F. C. 
Macdonald ; Comps. Capt. W. Finlayson, Lieuts. J. 
B. Syer, H. J. Thompson, Lance-Corp. C. T. Darling 
(killed in action), Ptes. H. G. Skelsey, E. A. Preston, 
H. H. Keller, C. D. Trueman, Joseph Sweeting (navy), 
W. E. Brown, A. E. Langman, H. W. Adams. 



232 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Ionic Chapter, No. 168, Campbellford, Ont. — 
Comps. Dr. R. H. Bonnycastle, A. B. Colville, V. S. 
Collinson, R. H. Pearse, E. Williams, Dr. A. Haig, R. 
H. Simpson, Geo. T. Dickson, F. G. Mitchell, C. W. 
West, A. McKinney, A. E. Gordon, W. J. Salter (killed 
in action), H. E. E. Salisbury, William H. Nicholls. 

Temiskaming Chapter. No. 169, New Liskeard, 
Ont. — Comps. James Warner (killed in action, Dec, 
1916), Wilfred F. Peterman (killed in action, Dec, 
1916). 

Golden Compass Chapter, No. 170, Sintaluta, 
Sask. — Comps. W. J. Patterson, F. G. Moore. 

Rabboni Chapter, No. 171, Dauphin, Man. — 
Comps. Dr. E. M. Vesey, Dr. Walter Ross, John Dent, 
Charles Wm. Shaw (killed in action), Philip Manby. 

Weyburn Chapter, No. 173, Weyburn, Sask. — 
Ex. Comp. John Chisholm Under hill ; Comps. Thomas 
Arthur Underwood, Herbert Charles Dazeley, George 
Forbes Guernsey, William McKay Little (died at war), 
William Alex. Nickle, G. M. Meek (died at war). 

Boundary Chapter, No. 174, Grand Forks, B.C. 
— Comps. Lieuts. Richard G. Hargraves, Frederick 
W. McLaine, Sergt. William J. Jory. 

The Hamilton Chapter, No. 175, Hamilton. 
Ont. — Ex. Comp. Capt. Ernest Kelly ; Comps. Col. 
George W. Ballard, Majors William Field, Herbert 
Jones (died), A. J. Taylor. 

Kaien Chapter, No. 178, Prince Rupert, B.C. — 
Ex. Comps. Major C. W. Peck (wounded), Capt. Don 
Moore (killed, May 20th, 1915) ; Comps. Capt. J. T. 
Wall, C.A.M.C, Sergt. R. W. Cameron, Sapper James 
M. Munnis, John F. Brandt, Wm. F. Beak, Neil M. 
McNeil, John A. McDonald (killed September 3rd, 
1916), Flight Lieut. Claude C. Purdy (killed in action), 
Robert *A. Stalker (killed in action), Thomas Stewart, 
Marriott M. Wells, Geo. B. Hull. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 233 

Estevan Chapter, No. 180, Estevan, Sask. — 
Comps. Capt. Samuel Dryden (D.C.M.) ; Lieut. 
Harold N. Scott, James Parkinson, Arthur W. Keith, 
W. T. Searle, Wm. Creighton, H. Vaughn. 

Battleford Chapter, No. 181, Battleford, 
Sask. — Comps. F. J. Surey, J. G. Stephenson, P. Yule, 
R. E. Osborne, Geoffrey Brichta (killed in action). 

Camosun Chapter, No. 182, Victoria, B.C. — Ex. 
Comp. S. C. Court (killed in action) ; Comps. R. 
Forster, G. Bangerter, R. Peters, R. Morrison, W. S. 
Brown, W. A. S. Duncan, Walter McNair (wounded), 
Fred Morrison, Geo. E. Wilkinson, Harry B. Capell, 
Charles Wm. Sowerby. 

Mount Sinai Chapter, No. 183, Rivers, Man. — 
Ex. Comp. Norman Ferguson (killed in action), Comps. 
Alexander Lindsay, Allan Sinclair Hodnett (killed in 
action). 

Hugh Murray Chapter, No. 184, Bridgeburg, 
Ont. — Comp. Sergt. Thomas V. Stamp. 

Toronto Chapter, No. 185, Toronto, Ont. — 
Comps. Majors John M. Gibson, Dr. Alex. Mackay, 
Capt. Dr. W. E. Struthers, Adjt. Arthur J. Everett, 
Lieuts. Edward C. Johnston, Ernest A. Ternan, M. B. 
Hastings, David F. Sykes, W. J. Crawford, H. Irwin, 
Sergts. R. H. McDonald, Wm. McCullough (killed in 
action), Ptes. Thomas Windsor, Elmo M. Mains, 
Charles Martin (killed in action). 

Unity Chapter, No. 186, Swift Current, Sask. — 
Comps. Lieuts. J. J. Doble, R. M. Crowe, Sergts. Alex. 
Murdoch, R. R. Anderson, Ptes. J. J. Palmer (killed in 
action, September 4th, 1916), L. M. Robinson, J. E. H. 
Laidlaw, John O. Grieves. 

Connaught Chapter, No. 187, Winnipeg, Man. — 
M. Ex. Comp. Field Marshal H.R.H. The Duke of 
Connaught ; Comps. Brig.-General R. Burritt, Lieut.- 
Col. L. McMeans ; R. Ex. Comp. Major G. W. Morden; 



234 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

Comps. Majors T. T. Kirby, J. A. McEwen ; Capts. 
E. A. Deacon, J. B. Gould (killed in action), C. S. Gunn, 

C. V. Lindsay, W. J. Simpson ; Lieuts. W. J. Brick, H. 
L. Chalmers, W. E. Davison, George G. Miller, S. H. 
Mitchell (died on active service, April 8th, 1915), Gunner 
W. T. Davis. 

Pacific Chapter, No. 190, Vancouver, B.C. — R. 
Ex. Comp. Capt. John H. Roaf ; Comps. Lieut. Ernest 
A. Stokes, Ptes. William Frisken, William Kennedy 
Murchie, James Alan Shafer, Ernest Seward Wisband. 
Richmond Adam, Harry B. Everard. Wilbur Johnston, 

North Vancouver Chapter, No. 191, North 
Vancouver, B.C. — Comps. Roy L. Wheeler (wounded), 
A. R.-Kerwin (wounded), E. A. Peers, S. H. Walker, 
E. T. Cockrell. 

Trinity Chapter, No. 192, Melville, Sask. — 
Comps. F. I. Tanner, Chas. Bell (died from wounds), 
Wm. Ernest Wardale, D. Matheson, Edward B. Connell 
(killed in action), W. E. Kemp, W. H. Bissett, A. E. 
Dobereiner, J. F. Crowell. 

Govan Chapter, No. 193, Go van, .Sask. — Comp. 
Daniel L. Scott, Robert T. Jaffray, Asa C. Beach, 
Daniel Mel. Orton. 

Orient Chapter, No. 194, Moosomin, Sask. — Ex. 
Comp. Capt. Dr. R. T. McLaren ; Comps. Capts. 

D. P. Miller, J. Wark ; Lieuts. C. B. Nicholl (died from 
wounds in France, July 30th, 1915), L. A. Franks, Jas. 
Wilson, Corp. Wm. James Shoult, Robert A. Buchan, 
A. F. MacKinnon, George O. Green, J. P. Cowles, G. E. 
Jenkins, J. Maneer, Harold L. Parke, Comps. Seaton 
Hairsine, David Grant. 

Couchiching Chapter, No. 198, Orillia, Ont. — 
Comps. Major John Preese, Lieut. W. O. Tudhope, 
Corp. H. M. Jupp, A. T. Bowers, Ex. Comp. N. W. 
Purdy, Comp. F. S. Brennan. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 235 

Cobalt Chapter, No. 203, Cobalt, Ont. — Comps. 
Majors R. P. Rogers, R. H. James ; Capts. W. F. 
Peterman (killed in action, September 26th, 1916), 
A. T. Smyth, P. L. Blodgett ; Lieuts. T. G. Code, W. 
T. Montgomery ; Pte. J. F. Askwith, Sapper B. W. 
Hughes, and Comp. A. J. Dawes. 

Victoria Chapter, No. 205, Thornhill, Ont. — 
Comps. Sergt. John Scott (died in Francte), T. G. 
Harper. 

Kelowna Chapter, No. 206, Kelowna, B.C. — 
Comps. Capt. Kenneth Maclaren, Lieut. C. W. Dickson, 
Q.M. -Sergt. Samuel Gray. 

King George Chapter, No. 207, Yorkton, Sask. 
— Comps. Lieut. David Wedderspoon, Wm. Henry 
Bissett, Arthur Edward Dobereiner. 

Humboldt Chapter, No. 209, Humboldt, Sask. — 
Comps. Major H. V. Mighton, Capt. C. G. Cox, Lieut. 
John A. Stirling, Sergt. A. P. Dowsett, Ptes. G. F. 

Gillespie, Charles Kent. 

-i 

• 

Shaunavon Chapter, No. 211, Shaunavon, Sask. 

— Comps. Lieut. J. A. McNicol, Pte. Albert H. Stevens 



I fought for my King and country." 



236 



GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



GRAND REPRESENTATIVES 

AT GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



Grand Chapters. 


Name. 


Residence. 










J. K. Brydon 

William Birrell 

T. W. Chappie 

J. W. Rogers 

J McC. Potts 

Abraham Shaw 

J. M. Shaw, M.D 

Robert W. Clewlo 

James H. Cowan 

W. N. Ponton 

W. H. G. Garrioch 

Wm. G. Reid 


















Stirling 
Kingston 






District of Columbia .... 
Florida 


Toronto 
Gait 




Belleville 
















C. W. Postlethwaite 

Geo. J. Bennett 

J. M. Gibson 

Henry T. Smith 


















W. Y. Mills 


Kingston 








R. G. W. Conolly 


















E. E. Chipman 






Alex. G. Horwood 

R. H. Spencer. 

W. H. Mowat 












New Brunswick 

New Hampshire 


James Woods, M.D 

W. S. R. Murch 


Sarnia 








Francis B. Reilly 






F. W. Harcourt 

Walter T. Connell 

R. W. Brennan 

Wm. G.Bell 


Toronto 








Toronto 




Winnipeg 






Ohio 


Hugh A. MacKay 

Ed. Worth 


Kitchener 




D. A. Clark, M.D 

H. S. Griffin, M.D 

Edward B. Brown 

Michael Walsh 

D. F. Macwatt 

Frank B. Gregory 

A. E. Cooper 

H. H. Watson 

E. T. Malone 

A. S. Gorrell, M.D 

J. B. Nixon 

Joseph W. Hickson 

Alex. Patterson 

A. T. Freed 




Pennsylvania 

Quebec 


Hamilton 

Toronto 

Ingersoll 


Scotland 


Sarnia 
Collingwood 






Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Victoria 

Virginia 


Vancouver 

Toronto 

Regina 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Toronto 

Hamilton 








Alexander Cowan 


Barrie 






Wyoming 


J. T. Hollinshead 


Port Arthur 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 237 

GRAND REPRESENTATIVES 

FROM GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 



Grand Chapters. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Alabama 

Alberta 


Lew Lazarus 

F. S. Watson 


Birmingham 


Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 


James Henry Barrett 

Jeff L. Davis 

Roland E. Hartley 

Lawrence N. Greenleaf . . . . 

Geo. N. Delap 

George S. Scott 


Douglas 

Fayetteville 

San Francisco 

Denver 

Hartford 

Wilmington 


Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 


Chester de Rocher 

J. A. Walton 

Wm. R. Hamilton, M.D.. . 


Bradentown 

Columbus 

Weiser 


Indiana 

Iowa 

Ireland 

Kansas 

Kentucky 


Thos. R. Marshall 

D. B. Ayleswortb. 

J. H. Neilson 

Harry F. White 

H. R. French 

John W. Armstrong 

WinfieldS. Hinkley 

Charles C. Homer 

Lorenzo L. Green 

Andrew P. Swanstrom .... 


Columbia City 

Eldora 

Dublin 

Topeka 

Mount Sterling 

Welsh 


Maine 


Lisbon 








St. Paul 








Thos. R. Morrow 

Clemens A. Spellman 

Frank Bell 


Kansas City 
Beatrice 


Nebraska 


New Brunswick 

New Hampshire 


Charles D. Jones 

Frank R. Marston 

Godfrey Pittis 


St. John 
Farmington 


New South Wales 

New York 


James McCreadie 

William Stanton, M.D 

Robert Fletcher 

J. E. Cameron 

Geo. H. Keyes 

G. S. Wright 

Ralph R. Rickly 

William Noble 

Donald McKay 

Samuel Shaw 


Sydney 


New Zealand 




North Carolina 

North Dakota 


Kinston 


Nova Scotia 




Ohio 












Pennsylvania 


Philadelphia 


Quebec 


I. H. Stearns 

W. R. Greene 

Chas. Maule Ramsay 

Wm. W. Wannamaker. . . . 

D. Carrigan 

Martin Bell 


Montreal 


Scotland 

South Carolina 


Brechin Castle 
Orangeburg 
Custer City 


South Dakota 




Texas 




Utah 


Michael Malone 

C. W. Whitcomb 

John Byatt 

E. L. Guey 

Nathan S. Porter . 


Ogden 


Vermont 


Victoria 

Virginia 


Melbourne 
Norfolk 




Olympia 

Fremantle 

Wheeling 

Duran 

Cheyenne 


Western Australia 


Wm. Henry Berry 

John A. Zorn 

A. J. Wallace 

Geo. C. Rafter 


i>in 

Wyoming 



N B. — The Grand Chapters of Michigan, Montana and New Mexico do not 
exchange representatives. 



238 



GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

GRAND SECRETARIES 



State. 



Alabama 

Alberta 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Canada 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

England 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Ireland 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Brunswick 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New South Wales 

New Zealand 

New York. 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Nova Scotia 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Quebec 

Rhode Island 

Scotland 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Victoria 

Virginia 

Washington 

Western Australia 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Gen. Grand Chapter, U.S. 



Name. 



George A. Beauchamp . 

J. E. Johnson 

George J. Roskruge. . . 

John C. Bone 

Thomas A. Da vies 

Henry T. Smith 

Charles H. Jacobson. . 

George A. Kies 

Stuart J. Horn 

Arvine W. Johnston . . 

P. Colville Smith 

Wilber P. Webster.... 

E. A. McHan 

Lewis W. Ensign . 



Residence 



Montgomery 

Calgary 

Tucson 

Batesville 

San Francisco 

Toronto, Ont. 

Denver 

Hartford 

Wilmington 

Washington 

F. M. H., London 

Jacksonville 

Macon 

Boise 



J. E. Jeffers | Springfield 



Calvin W. Prather. 

O. F. Graves , 

Hy. E. Flavelle 

Albert K. Wilson 

G. Allison Holland 

John A. Davilla , 

Chas. B. Davis 

JohnH. Miller 

Frederick T. Comee... . 
Charles A. Conover. . . . 

John Fishel 

Frederic Gordon Speed . 
Robert F. Stevenson . . . 
Cornelius Hedges, Jr. . . 

Francis E. White 

Edward D. Vanderlieth 

J. Twining Hartt 

Harry M. Cheney 

Peter McGill 

Alpheus A. Keen 

Alf. J. Burbidge 

Herbert J. Williams 

Chas. C. Hunt 

John B. Griggs , 

Walter L. Stockwell 

B. F. Porter , 

Edwin Hagenbuch 

James A. Scott 

James F. Robinson 

Geo. B.Wells 

W. M. Couper 

William R. Greene 

Alfred A. Murray 

O. Frank Hart 

George A. Pettigrew. . . 

Stith M. Cain 

T. M. Bartley 

Walter Daniels 

Henry H. Ross 

G. L. Marquand 

James B. Blanks 

Yancey C. Blalock 

John C. Strickland 

David K. Reed 

William W. Perry 

Adrian J. Parshall 

Charles A. Conover. 



Indianapolis 

Harlan 

F. M. H., Dublin 

Topeka 

Lexington 

New Orleans 

Portland 

Baltimore 

Boston 

Coldwater 

St. Paul 

Vicksburg 

St. Louis 

Helena 

Omaha 

Carson City 

St. John 

Concord 

Bound Brook 

Albuquerque 

F.M.H., Sydney 

F.M.H., Wellington 

New York 

Elizabeth City 

Fargo 

Truro 

Urbana 

Muskogee 

Portland 

Philadelphia 

Montreal, Que. 

Providence 

Edinburgh 

Columbia 

Sioux Falls 

Nashville 

Tahoka 

Salt Lake City 

Burlington 

F.M.H., Melbourne 

Petersburg 

Walla Walla 

Perth 

Clarksburg 

Milwaukee 

Cheyenne 

Coldwater, Mich. 



ANNUAL CONVOCATION, TORONTO, 1919 239 

INDEX TO PROCEEDINGS, 1919 



PAGE 

Active Chapters 152 

ress of Grand Z 14 

Amendments to By-laws 154 

Annual Convocation, where held 3-5 

Annual Report, Foreign Correspondence presented 178 

Appointments of Grand Officers 182 

Assets of Grand Chapter 157 

By-laws Approved 154 

Certificates of Good Standing 151 

Credentials, Report of Committee on 6 

Chapters Represented 9 

Charter Members — New Chapters 153 

Communications 146 

Crow's Nest Chapter, warrant surrendered 150 

Dispensations Issued 151 

District Grand Superintendents 176 

District Grand Superintendents, Reports of . . 31 

Deaths 204 

Election of Officers 177 

Executive Committee : Elected Members 177 

Appointed Members 182 

Benevolence 178 

Foreign Correspondence Appendix 

Grand Chapter : Opened 4-6 

Officers present 3-5 

Representatives present 12 

Closed 183 

Grand Superintendent of District present 5 

Grand Chapter of B.C. — formation approved 148 

Historian Elected 177 

Honorary Rank P.G.Z. Conferred— E. T. Malone 179 

Honor Roll 213 

In Memoriam 201 

Installation of Officers 181 

Instructions to Grand Superintendents 181 

List of Grand Representatives 236-7 

List of Grand Secretaries 238 

List of Executive Committee and Sub-Committee 184 



240 GRAND CHAPTER OF CANADA 

List of Chapters by Districts 187 

Membership 171 

Minutes Annual Convocation 1918 adopted 12 

Next Place of Meeting 177 

New Chapters 153 

Payment for use of rooms 180 

Paying travelling expenses of Executive Committee 181 

Proposed testimonial to retiring Grand Z 180 

Reports of Executive Committee on : 

Audit and Finance 162 

Benevolence 159 

Condition of Capitular Masonry 165 

Grand Z.'s Address 173 

Warrants 160 

Report of Grand Scribe E 149 

Report of Grand Treasurer 157 

Resolutions to Receive and Adopt the Report of Executive 
Committee on : 

Audit and Finance 164 

Benevolence 160 

Condition of Capitular Masonry 172 

Grand Z.'s Address 175 

Warrants 161 

Returns of Subordinate Chapters 191 

Restorations 200 

Revision in Directions in Work 179 

Sash Restored to Regalia of Order 179 

Scrutineers of Ballot 177 

Suitable Regalia for I.P.G.Z 179 

Suspensions 197 

Vote of Thanks to Toronto and Masonic Temple Corporation. 180 

" Scrutineers 180 

Chapters 180 

Warrants and Seals returned from Alberta Chapters 152 



APPENDIX 



REPORT ON 

FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE 



Companions of the Most Excellent Grand Chapter of 
Royal Arch Masons of Canada : — 

Presenting our 4th Annual Report or Review 
of the proceedings of other Grand Chapters, we — an 
editor uses the plural, as does a king — venture to pre- 
face it with what orators euphemistically call "a few 
remarks." The chairman at a public meeting, when 
introducing the principal speaker, often (and quite 
unnecessarily) gives a more or less brief sketch of what 
he thinks the speaker is going to say. This is not to 
be that kind of an introduction. Last year we discussed 
the functions of a preface and of a conclusion and 
found it difficult to make a distinction between them. 
Let us now begin at the very beginning. The reviewer 
is in his sanctum sanctorum. The door is close-tiled, 
Excellent Sirs. His materials are assembled — his 
working tools ready at hand, his pen, his ink, his 
scissors, his paste. He looks at the materials — a pile 
of books, 50 or more — and reflects that the Grand Scribe 
E. has power to add to their number. He examines 
the outsides of the books : they are chiefly red, some 
are white, and a few are yellow (not in an evil sense), 
one is gray (but not with years), and one is gorgeous 
in purple. What are the dates on the books ? The 
reviewer, let it be said, begins his task on the first 
day of the first month — the year is 1919. The armis- 
tice is in force, but peace is not yet. The dates, that 
is, the dates of the proceedings to be reviewed, will be, 
he hastily assumes, all in different months of 1918. 
But no, he remembers, some Grand Chapters meet in 
December, a good many in November, and some Grand 
Secretaries are late in getting out their books. There 
must be some proceedings of 1917 which did not reach 
him in time for his 1918 review. And indeed, on a 
closer examination, he finds that about one-third of 
the whole are labelled 1917, and in a few instances he 
has both 1917 and 1918. So much for the outsides of 
the books. What about the insides ? He indulges 
himself in anticipation, most of it pleasant. What 



iv APPENDIX 

will be said about the war ? After all, most of the 
books come from the United States. The British 
Grand Chapters are few, and usually, with the excep- 
tions of Scotland, Quebec, Nova Scotia, and, we now 
must add, Alberta, not enthralling. Will our Com- 
panions of the Great Republic wave the flag and make 
the eagle scream ? Will the Grand High Priests say 
something or will they confine themselves to statistics 
and platitudes ? Will the "necrologists" or "memor- 
ialists" "drop into poetry" as of yore ? Grand High 
Priests come and go, but the Companions of the Round 
Table are a quasi-permanent body. Shall *we meet 
again at that invisible board all our old friends, or have 
some been gathered to their fathers ? These questions 
will be answered in good time. So we proceed, re- 
straining our curiosity, methodically and alphabetically, 
to take up the books one by one. And the first and 
not the least of these is : — 

Alabama. 

It is sometimes said that there is a sameness about 
the proceedings of Grand Chapters and that it is 
seldom that anything interesting is found in the Annual 
Reports. That is not the experience of the best writers 
in the Correspondence Corps, as we read their reviews ; 
and, indeed, to the diligent seeker often comes the 
reward of finding such abundant riches in a report 
that there is not room to receive it all. That is a 
matter of thankful and glad experience. 

'Way -down in Alabama they seem to know the 
secret of pressing into the service of the Royal Craft 
men of high culture, of light and leading. In 1916, 
an eminent physician filled the highest office in Grand 
Chapter ; and in 1917 we have his successor, John 
Henry McCormick, Most Excellent Grand High Priest, 
also a physician, and more — a professor in the National 
University, and a scientist of high repute. This much 
we learn from an excellent biographical sketch (with 
portrait) prefacing the volume of proceedings at the 
91st Annual Convocation, held in the City of Mont- 
gomery on the 3rd and 4th December, 1917. It 
is added : "He is a man of much erudition and learning 






APPENDIX v 

and is endowed with a brilliant and comprehensive 
intellect, kindness of heart, and a warm, genial disposi- 
tion. As a conversationalist and as a writer he is as 
eloquent with his tongue as with his pen." 

The Grand Chapter was opened in due form by 
the Deputy Grand High Priest, after which the Grand 
High Priest made a state entry and was duly honoured. 
This procedure is noted as being new, and intended 
to make the opening "a little more impressive and a 
little more formal." 

The Grand High Priest, in his address to Grand 
Chapter, after an eloquent reference to the war and 
the duty of Masons — "our duty everywhere, our duty 
always, evil and wrong never, a base act nowhere" — 
spoke feelingly of the death, on the 26th February, 
1915, of Past Grand High Priest Francis Harwood 
Bates, who was born in 1851 and presided over the 
Grand Chapter in 1905. 

The claims of the Masonic Widows and Orphans' 
Home of Alabama were forcibly brought to the atten- 
tion of Grand Chapter. "The pressing times," it was 
said, "have increased the number of our dependents, 
and likewise the cost of their maintenance." 

The Grand High Priest made a record in Alabama 
by visiting every subordinate Chapter in the jurisdic- 
tion — there are 64. "I felt," he said, "the necessity 
of calling the attention of the Companions at this time 
to a better understanding of the true Free -Masonry. 
For the most part, outside of a knowledge of the ritual 
and the laws governing the Chapter, the great mass of 
Capitular Masons seem to have no true conception of 
its meaning or its purpose. I therefore requested each 
Chapter to dispense with work upon the occasion of 
my visit ; after the formal official visit was concluded 
. . . the Blue Lodge Masons of the vicinity were invited 
to become the guests of the Chapter, and a general 
discussion of Free Masonry ensued. The interest 
generally manifested was a constant and convincing 
argument in favour of the course pursued. It was 
gratifying to note that, so far as I could ascertain, there 
was not a single Chapter in which peace and harmony 
did not prevail — a truly wonderful record, which is 



vi APPENDIX 

further evidenced by the fact that I have not been 
called upon to make a single official decision during 
the year." 

Passing from the record of his visits the Most 
Excellent took up the subject of "Inspections." "From 
the information at hand, I am convinced," he said, 
"that the inspection plan as an efficient piece of ma- 
chinery is a failure and should be abolished." He, 
therefore, recommended that the inspection system be 
abolished, and that, in lieu thereof, a Grand Lecturer 
be appointed, at a salary of $1,200 per annum, "whose 
duty it shall be to visit the several subordinate Chapters 
when requested to do so by a Chapter or by direction 
of the Grand High Priest, to instruct said Chapter in 
the ritvj al and laws of the Order ; and that he shall also give 
instructions in the history and symbolism of Free 
Masonry in so far as it relates to Capitular Masonry." 

This recommendation was referred to the Committee 
on Masonic Jurisprudence, who reported concurrence 
with it, but suggested that the financial aspect of it 
should be dealt with by the Finance Committee. We 
read that the Report of the Jurisprudence Committee 
was adopted ; but we do not find that the Finance 
Committee reported ; and we may infer from the fact 
that 15 District Inspectors were appointed for the 
ensuing Capitular year, that the recommendation has 
at least not yet become law. 

The Grand Treasurer's budget is a small one ; he 
deals with receipts of only $3,682 ; of this sum $500 
was expended in a gift to the Masonic Home already 
spoken of. The balance of $2,206.21 from 1916 was 
increased to $2,602.21. 

There are, as we have said, 64 Chapters, one being 
under dispensation ; the total membership on the 
15th October, 1917, was 5,292 ; the net gain in a 
year was 399 — not a bad showing, all drawbacks being 
considered. 

The Correspondence Report is once more written 
by the able and scholarly Lawrence H. Lee, P.G.H.P. 
Canada, 1917, is dealt with appreciatively ; and there 
is a kindly and encouraging word for the present 



APPENDIX vii 

reviewer. Comp. Lee's conclusion is well worth 
quoting : — 

"It is a far cry from Alberta, all around the world, 
and back to Wyoming. But the task is attended with 
nothing but pleasure, and the trip is always of more 
benefit to the traveller than to those who will endeavour 
to trace his steps as he passed on the way through the 
Capitular domains. 

"Many of the Reviewers announce that they find 
nothing novel or startling in the Capitular World. 
This is true. The writer, however, desires to record 
the fact that there is a note of hope and progress almost 
everywhere. Here and there in the addresses delivered 
is a note of warning that Masonry is on trial, and must 
answer for herself and justify her existence, when the 
world emerges from its baptism of fire, and begins to 
take an account of the institutions claiming its notice 
because of beneficial potencies to the human race. If 
each Mason can realise the potencies for good within his 
reach, and put into militant operation the lessons in- 
culcated, the answer will not be hard to give, nor will 
the regenerated world be slow to accord it first place 
in Human Institutions of benefit to Humanity. So 
mote it be." 

Henry F. Reese, Selma, Grand High Priest. 

George A. Beauchamp, Montgomery, Grand Secre- 
tary. 

Alberta. 

Congratulations to the youngest of the Grand 
Chapters (save one) on its harmony and steady pro- 
gress ! 

The 4th Annual Convocation was held in the City 
of High River, on the 13th March, 1918 ; M.E. 
Comp. Robert Patterson, Grand Z., presiding. From 
his address we cull the following paragraphs :— 

"The hand of death has been upon some of our 
subordinate Chapters. Nine of our Companions died 
on active service, and eight died at home. 

"The scrap of paper may be torn, words of honour 
may be broken, but our Brotherhood remains unshaken, 
being founded on the everlasting rock of Truth." 



viii APPENDIX 

"There are 20 subordinate Chapters in this juris- 
diction. I visited all except 3." 

"The work is being uniformly and accurately 
rendered ; harmony and a true fraternal spirit is 
everywhere manifest ; and an active interest is taken 
in promoting the cause of Capitular Masonry through- 
out the Province." 

x The Province is divided into three districts, and 
there are three reports from as many Grand Superin- 
tendents. 

The Report of the Committee on the Condition of 
Capitular Masonry states : — 

"At the time of last report laid before this Grand 
Body there were 18 Chapters and 1,736 members. It 
is most gratifying to be able to state that there are now 
20 Chapters and 1,872 members, the last Chapter, 
Kether, having decided to enroll under the banner of 
Alberta, thus making us a united and happy family." 

The finances of the Grand Chapter seem to be 
healthy. The receipts are not large, nor are the dis- 
bursements, but the balance on hand, $674.65, on the 
11th February, 1918, is greater than at the end of 
the previous year. 

The net increase in membership in a year is 136. 

The Honour Roll of Royal Arch Masons who have 
enlisted for service Overseas is a long one. 

The Report of the Committee on Correspondence, 
presented by M.E. Comp. S. Y. Taylor, P.G.Z., is 
introduced in these words : — 

"Following the course now adopted by several 
Grand Chapters, we have compiled in brief form what 
we considered to be some of the most important topics 
under discussion in Capitular Masonry in other Grand 
Jurisdictions. While the established method so long 
in use in many Jurisdictions is much more complete 
and touches upon more subjects, yet for the sake of 
economy and brevity we have adopted this plan for 
the present. We have not attempted to discuss or 
give in our own words an outline of these topics and 
events but have deemed it wise to give in the writer's 
own language his arguments on the question under 



APPENDIX ix 

discussion, and earnestly hope that the Companions of 
Alberta will read carefully the information submitted. 

"To our Companions of the Guild let us say that 
we regret that we cannot spend the time and space to 
visit you personally through this medium. We have 
enjoyed your interesting reports and hope to know you 
better in future years." 

And then follow some selections from Correspon- 
dence Reports. 

Andrew R. Dickson, Wetaskiwin, Grand Z. 

John E. Johnson, 633 Fifteenth Avenue West, 
Calgary, Grand Scribe E. 

Arizona. 

The 28th Annual Convocation of the Grand Chapter 
of Arizona was held in the City of Tucson, on the 13th 
February, 1918. Louis Gwaltney Moyers, Grand 
High Priest, presided. From his portrait (frontispiece 
of volume of proceedings) he appears to be quite young 
and vigorous ; no account of his life is given. In his 
address he said : — 

" While the growth of our organisation has not kept 
pace with the rapid strides of some of our sister Juris- 
dictions, it is gratifying to me to be able to report a 
revivifying interest in Capitular Masonry in Arizona 
and a healthy increase in membership in the subordinate 
Chapters. Reports from the various secretaries show 
a net gain of 68 in our Jurisdiction for the year,' the 
largest gain of any one year in our history. 

"Since our last Convocation the black' canopy of 
war, which for the past three years has hung like a 
pall over Europe, has spread its blighting shadow to 
our own land and we have been drawn into the awful 
vortex. With the freedom of the world threatened 
by the barbarism of the middle ages and even civiliza- 
tion itself in the balance, our country could no longer 
remain a disinterested spectator deaf to the cries of 
outraged humanity. The war, therefore, has come 
to us and we must see it through. No divided allegi- 
ance or wavering loyalty is to be tolerated. Our 
country first, and we, as Royal Arch Masons, true to 
the precepts of our Order, that teaches faith in God 



x APPENDIX 

and loyalty to Country, must stand ready to do our 
duty regardless of what that duty may be or where it 
calls us ; to give of our time, our means, and our very 
lives, if need be, in defence of those principles of right 
and justice on which our government was founded." 

There appear to be 11 subordinate Chapters, with 
a membership of 896 ; net gain in a year, 68. 

The financial statement shows prosperity — $7,000 
invested in bonds and a cash balance for the year of 
$1,300. 

No Correspondence Report. 

James H. Barrett, Douglas, Grand High Priest. 

George J. Roskruge, Tucson, Grand Secretary. 

Arkansas. 

A revival of Royal Arch Masonry in the State of 
Arkansas was noticed in our review in 1918 of the 
proceedings of the Grand Chapter in 1917. In the 
book of the proceedings now before us — the Grand 
Chapter met at Little Rock on the 22nd November, 
1917 — there is no specific account of the progress made ; 
but, on studying the reports, we find that the number 
of Chapters was increased from 88 to 89 and the mem- 
bership from 4,615 to 4,835 — a gain of 220. The 
financial condition is good. A fund of $5,000, already 
invested, was ordered to be reinvested in the purchase 
of Liberty bonds. And a grant of $50 was made to a 
disabled Companion. 

We find Grand High Priest Allen Winham, of 
Taxarkana, seated in the Grand East, and delivering 
an address in which he notes the passing of two eminent 
Royal Craftsmen of Arkansas, viz. : Caleb H. Stone, 
P.G.H.P., who was 88 when he died in December, 1916, 
and was Grand High Priest in 1881 ; and Robert 
Liddell, P.G.H.P., who died in February, 1917, at the 
age of 67, and was Grand High Priest in 1912. 

In reference to the condition of the Grand Chapter, 
M.E. Comp. Winham, said : — 

1 ' During the years I have been an officer of this 
Grand Chapter, I have indulged the hope that, should 
I ever reach the exalted position of Grand High Priest, 
I would spend the year among the Chapters of this 



APPENDIX xi 

Jurisdiction in personal touch with the Companions in 
an endeavour to arouse a greater interest in Capitular 
Masonry. I regret more than I can express to you that 
conditions in my own affairs have rendered it impossible 
for me to do as I had planned. The proportion of 
Chapter Masons in Arkansas to Blue Lodge Masons 
is perhaps smaller than it is in a great majority of the 
Grand Jurisdictions of our country. Many of our 
Chapters are weak and need assistance. Grand High 
Priest Whipple, in his masterly address a year ago, 
gave a list of about 15 towns and villages where it is 
possible and desirable to organise Chapters. We 
ought to succour the weak Chapters and organise other 
Chapters. 

"I recommend that this Grand Chapter shall 
consider the advisability of putting some competent 
Companion in the field with sufficient compensation 
to enable him to devote his time and talents to this 
work." 

This recommendation was referred to the Committee . 
on Jurisprudence, who reported that under the existing 
conditions the Grand Chapter would not be justified 
in putting an "organiser" in the field. The report 
was adopted, and the recommendation thus disapproved. 

E. Comp. Gordon Huffmaster presents the Report 
on Foreign Correspondence. In opening he says : 
"We have reviewed every Jurisdiction whose proceed- 
ings have reached us." Canada's proceedings evident- 
ly did not reach him, though the reason why we cannot 
tell. Alberta, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and 
Quebec are included. The report is a good one in 
spite of the significant omission. 

Thomas J. W r oods, Evening Shade, Grand High 
Priest. 

John C. Bone, Batesville, Grand Secretary. 

California. 

The proceedings of the Grand Chapter in 1918 are 
very interesting ; and not less so the proceedings at 
a special Convocation held on the 8th September, 
1917, in the Masonic Home for Children, situated near 
Covina, for the purpose of participating in the ceremony 



xii APPENDIX 

of the dedication of that institution. We quote from 
the report : — 

''The Masonic Home for Children near Covina 
was erected at a cost of $130,000 — exclusive of furn- 
ishings — and is located upon about 36 acres of orchard 
and farming land. The funds for two of the buildings 
were contributed by Masons throughout the State, 
while those for the third building were donated by a 
Brother Mason whose name (at his request) is un- 
known — except to a few of the brethren. 

"These buildings stand as a monument to the 
noblest in Masonry ; a sheltering place for worthy 
homeless and needy orphan children of deceased 
Masonic brethren in California. The location is 
attractively situated in the lap of the verdant San 
Gabriel Valley. 

"All the material which entered into the construc- 
tion of the buildings was obtained in America." 

At the Convocation in 1918 a sum of $5,000 was 
appropriated for the purpose of constructing and 
equipping a building for vocational training as an 
adjunct to the home. 

The Convocation referred to, the 64th Annual 
Convocation, was held in San Francisco on the 16th 
April, 1918. Grand High Priest Edward Byron 
Spencer (portrait prefacing volume of proceedings) 
presided. After the opening, the Grand High Priest 
was presented with a gavel made of wood from an 
Acacia tree grown on the heights of Mount Moriah, 
and fashioned by the hands of the orphan boys of the 
Covina Home. The reception of the United States 
flag and the service flag of Grand Chapter followed. 
There was great enthusiasm. 

In the Grand High Priest's address, suitable mention 
was made of the death on the 6th April, 1917, of 
Past Grand High Priest Willet ; the death on the 8th 
June, 1917, of Henry Ascroft, Grand Lecturer ; 
and the deaths of several other members of the Cali- 
fornia Grand Chapter, as well as of distinguished 
Royal Craftsmen of other Jurisdictions. 

Ex. Comp. Daniel Bradford Richards, of California 
Chapter No. 5, San Francisco, was appointed Grand 



APPENDIX xiii 

Lecturer. The position is an important one in the 
California jurisdiction ; a salary of $2,400 was formerly- 
paid ; but new arrangements were • made by which 
District Deputies are to relieve the Grand Lecturer of 
many of his duties ; and his salary was reduced to 
$300 with travelling expenses where necessary. 

The Grand High Priest's address dealt with many 
subjects, and he made many practical recommenda- 
tions. 

His diligence in visiting the subordinate Chapters 
scattered over a large State was almost unequalled, 
and good results had been obtained. 

The' Grand Secretary's Report showed a total 
membership of 14,026 for 122 Chapters (14 of which 
are inactive), and a net gain in a year of 210. 

The Grand Treasurer's Report showed $60,000 
invested funds and cash balance $16,645.12, an increase 
of more than $2,500 in a year. 

"The Challenge of the Present Crisis" was the 
subjedt of an eloquent address by the Grand Chaplain, 
Comp. J. Whitcomb Brougher. Self-sacrifice is the 
key-note. There were several other excellent addresses. 

The Report of the Committee on Correspondence 
for the year ending April, 1918, signed by Hugh King 
McKevitt, Chairman, was presented. The proceed- 
ings of 48 Grand Chapters are briefly reviewed ; our 
own Grand Chapter receives its share of attention. 

William Parker Filmer, 330 Jackson Street, San 
Francisco, Grand High Priest. 

Thomas A. Davies, Masonic Temple, San Francisco, 
Grand Secretary. 

Colorado. 

The task of the reviewer when he comes to Colorado 
is in one respect an easy one. Difficulties may arise 
from an embarrassment of riches ; but there is no dif- 
ficulty in getting at the things which every reviewer 
looks for in every volume and sometimes cannot find. 
In the book before us, containing the proceedings of 
the Grand Chapter of Colorado at its 44th Annual 
Convocation, held in Denver on the 18th September, 
1918, we are at once confronted with a portrait of the 
newly elected and installed Grand High Priest, Herbert 



xiv APPENDIX 

Stead Sands, and an account of his life follows im- 
mediately. Of British parentage, he was born in 
Stamford, Connecticut, in 1874 ; his mother, who died 
in Colorado in 1916, was Elizabeth Victoria French, 
born in Ballinasloe, Ireland, and a cousin of the present 
Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland, Viscount French. Comp. 
Sands is an electrical engineer and the manager in 
Denver for the Westinghouse Electric and Manufac- 
turing Company. He has had a distinguished career 
in Masonry. His biographer says that he is thoroughly 
conversant with the spirit and purposes of Masonry, 
has the faculty of constructive organisation, together 
with a sympathy with and generous toleration 'for the 
opinions of others. 

Comp. Sands, however, plays a subordinate part 
in the proceedings before us. It is M.E. Comp. 
William S. Pickerill, of Durango, whom we find pre- 
siding as Grand High Priest at the opening of the 44th 
Annual Convocation, and making an address in which 
he announces the creation of a Colorado Soldier 
Masons' War Relief Fund, and thus pleads for its 
support : — 

"We are going to create a fund for the care of the 
maimed, the wounded, and the diseased of our Brothers, 
Companions, and Fraters. We, therefore, earnestly 
ask every Mason who is a member of one or more of 
the above named Bodies, voluntarily to contribute 
$1 per quarter for each Body of which he is a member, 
to be paid into the hands of the Secretary of the re- 
spective Bodies on or before the first day of April, 
June, September, and December of each year during 
the war or until peace shall be declared ; making a 
total of $4 per annum for each Master Mason ; $4 
per annum for each Royal Arch Mason ; and $4 per 
annum for each Knight Templar ; a total of $12 per 
annum if a member of all three Bodies. 

"We have made no sacrifices as yet. We who 
remain at home cannot make any sacrifices at all 
comparable to those that will be made by those who 
shall go into the war and to those who are dependent 
upon them. We must learn to give and to give will- 
ingly. If we were to give all that we have of material 



APPENDIX xv 

wealth, it would be as nothing compared to what many 
will be called upon to give and to sacrifice." 

The Grand Treasurer's Report showed an invested 
surplus of about $15,000 and a cash balance on hand 
of about $5,000. 

The Grand Secretary reported 49 Chapters on the 
roll ; total membership, 6,275 ; net gain in a year, 227. 

Two new Chapters were constituted and dedicated 
during the year. 

During the year two Past Grand High Priests 
passed on. James Hamilton Peabody, a successful 
merchant of Canon City, was Governor of the State 
of Colorado in 1902. An eminent Mason, he served 
the office of Grand High Priest in 1896-97. He was 
born in Vermont in 1852. George D. Kennedy was 
born in 1869, was Grand High Priest in 1908-9, and 
died in January, 1918. He was by profession a dentist. 

The well-loved Companion Ernest LeNeve Foster, 
Chairman of the Committee on Correspondence, shows 
his customary ability and discretion in his 31st Report, 
which he presents "with the hope that our condensa- 
tions of the proceedings and a few remarks of our own 
may meet with your approval." He also gives his 
annual digest of decisions. The proceedings of 52 
Grand Bodies are reviewed, among them the Grand 
Chapter of Canada, which receives careful attention 
and even some encomiums. 

Herbert S. Sands, Denver, Grand High Priest. 

Charles H. Jacobson, Denver, Grand Secretary. 

Columbia (District of). 

Unfortunately we have not space to print the whole 
of the address of M.E. Comp. William W. Jermane, 
Grand High Priest, delivered at the 51st Annual 
Convocation of the Grand Chapter of the District of 
Columbia, held in Washington on the 13th February, 
1918. Every word of it is worth reading, but our 
readers (if any) must be content with a few extracts : — 

"In reviewing the work of the year I meet a condi- 
tion which many of my predecessors have met. The 
Royal Craft is not growing ; indeed, it is not holding 
its own. The condition of apathy, which has been 



xvi APPENDIX 

so noticeable for a number of years, continues ; it 
must be corrected if we are to justify our right to 
continued profitable existence. The chief reason for 
this condition is found in the belief held by many of 
our members that they can reap where they have not 
sown, or otherwise than as they have sown. If we 
continue to sow indifference and neglect, we shall 
continue to reap stagnation." 

"If there ever was a time when Royal Arch Masonry 
in this Jurisdiction needed the loyal support of its 
membership, that time is now. I make this appeal 
with all the emphasis at my command. A larger 
attendance at the Chapter Convocations is our greatest 
need. If we can have this, all our other problems in 
time will solve themselves ; unless we can have it, 
those problems will become increasingly difficult." 

"The membership of the 13 constituent Chapters 
at the end of the year was 3,524, a net loss of 48 as 
compared with the membership of a year ago. There 
might have been an increase but for the fact that 
certain of the Chapters made up their minds to suspend 
all Companions who were in arrears for dues. This 
action in every instance had my hearty approval. If 
all the Chapters had pursued that course, the reports 
would show a net decrease much greater than that 
just mentioned ; but such a move, I believe, would 
have been in the interest of better things. Companions 
are not conferring a favour upon anybody by keeping 
their names on our rolls, and, the moment they begin 
to think they are, steps should be taken to convince 
them of their mistake. Nor is it in keeping with the 
dignity of the institution for the Secretary and line 
officers to become collection agents in their efforts to 
induce Companions to square their accounts. There 
has been entirely too much activity of that kind in the 
Jurisdiction, and I note with pleasure that several of 
the Chapters have decided not to permit any more of it. 
When Companions make up their minds that the 
Chapter no longer means anything to them, they should 
be permitted to go their way in peace. When they 
fail to respond to the statutory notices, and are un- 
willing to seek the relief that is always generously given 



APPENDIX xvii 

those who cannot afford to pay, our work has been 
done. Subsequent solicitation does them no good, and 
it does the Chapters positive harm." 

The slump in Washington is not perhaps a very 
alarming one ; but the wise words of Grand High Priest 
Jermane have a universal application, and may well 
be pondered over in any Jurisdiction. We venture 
most respectfully to concur wholly in the opinions 
expressed. 

Comp. Jermane is a man of marked ability ; a 
Washington correspondent for State newspapers ; 
and a great Mason. He was born in 1862, and has 
lived in Washington since 1899. 

George Edgar Carson, Grand High Priest of the 
General Grand Chapter of the United States, was 
present at this Convocation — he is, of course, a Past 
Grand High Priest of Columbia, and has been a member 
of the Grand Chapter for 40 years. He was accorded 
the usual honours, and addressed the Grand Chapter. 
In this connection it may be mentioned that the Gen- 
eral Grand Chapter met in October, 1918, not in Wash- 
ington, but in Baltimore. The necessary accommoda- 
tion was not available in Washington in October, 1918, 
as seems natural ; but Baltimore, like Captain Costi- 
gan's cellar, is "handy by," and the delegates had 
the opportunity of seeing the federal capital city. 

Two Past Grand High Priests died during the year 
of office of Comp. Jermane : Henry Kedglie Simpson, 
Grand High Priest in 1905 ; and Moses Dawson Mull, 
Grand High Priest in 1911. 

"The stated Convocations of a Chapter shall be 
at least two in each month." So says the Book of 
the Law. The Grand High Priest recommended that 
"one" be substituted for "two." The proposal re- 
ceived the 12 months' hoist — but it will doubtless 
receive approval at the next Annual Convocation. 

There are 13 constituent Chapters, as already 
mentioned ; these have a total membership of 3,524 ; 
and there was a net loss of 48 in a year. 

The Grand Chapter is necessarily not a large one, 
and the Grand Treasurer's budget is small — $2,500 



xviii APPENDIX 

invested in Liberty bonds, and a cash balance on hand 
of $4,617.61. 

R.E. Comp. Roe Fulkerson — who, we see, has 
climbed up the promotion ladder as far as Grand 
Principal Sojourner — continues to write the Corres- 
pondence Report. It is as racy as ever. It is a 
pleasure to quote the conclusion : — 

"Whoa, Pegasus ! Old hoss, we have been around 
the circle for the ninth time. Here we stop for eats. 
The track has not been heavy this year, but we are 
both a bit saddle-worn, a few splints, ringbones, and 
spavins are slowing your gait, and your wings do not 
flop with the same youthful enthusiasm. 

"It may be, too, that the hand on your bridle is a 
little shaky from too much riding, and so is less inclined 
to guide you off the centre of the track and close to the 
rail, where the race is more risky and exciting. 

"But everything is changing, Pegasus. Dependent 
membership is a dead issue ; the crowd around the 
Alberta-Canada bout is scattering, which shows the 
fight is over ; nobody will speak to Miss Scotland, for 
her reputation as a home-breaker is established ; 
every one is becoming resigned to prohibition ; people 
are no longer practising the best policy brandy of 
honesty ; but are being good because they enjoy it ; 
the war in Europe has ceased to be a horror and become 
an institution ; but, dog-gone it, it's a good world, 
after all — but gee, Pegasus the good die young, and 
good things are so rarely interesting things to exper- 
ience, read about, or write about." 

The proceedings of 50 Grand Chapters are reviewed ; 
Canada, 1917, is sympathetically treated ; and this is 
said, with a touch of genuine pathos, of which a true 
humourist is ever capable : — 

"As an afterthought we wish to add that their 
(Canada's) book has in it pages set aside for an honour- 
roll for those Companions who have gone across the 
water to follow their flag in this last great fight, which 
is now our fight, to establish that great principle first 
taught at the Masonic altar, the equality of man. We 
will meet them there and call to them, and please God 
our call will be, 'Come on, Companions !' not 'Go on, 



APPENDIX xix 

Companions,' as we have been calling across the border 
for the last few years." 

Arthur C. Shaw, Masonic Temple, Washington, 
DC, Grand High Priest. 

Arvine W. Johnston, Masonic Temple, Washington, 
D.C., Grand Secretary. 

Connecticut. 

At the 120th Annual Convocation of the Grand 
Chapter of Roval Arch Masons of Connecticut, held 
in the City of Hartford on the 14th May, 1918, there 
were 15 Past Grand High Priests present, and it was 
regretfully recorded that 3 had died during the year of 
office of Grand High Priest Edward W. Avery, who 
presided. 

A notable departure was that of M.E. Comp. James 
McCormick, P.G.H.P. and Grand Secretary, on the 
25th June, 1917. He was born in 1831, in Flushing, 
New York. In 1860 he settled in Windsor, Connec- 
ticut, where he remained until his death. He was 
made a Mason in 1853, was Master of his Lodge in 
1855-56, and from that time to the end of his life was 
almost continuously in the service. He was Grand 
High Priest in 1885-86, and had been Grand Secretary 
for 23 years. 

P.G.H.P. George A. Kies was appointed to serve 
out the year as Grand Secretary, and was elected Grand 
Secretary at this Convocation. 

P.G.H.P. Wesley U. Pearne died at his home in 
Middletown on the 5th July, 1917 ; he was born in 
1851, made a Mason in 1875, and served as Grand High 
Priest in 1899. 

The Senior Past Grand High Priest, M.E. Comp. 
Henry W. Coye, died at his home in Vineyard Haven, 
Mass., on the 27th November, 1917, at the age of 88 ; 
he was Grand High Priest in 1876-7. 

There are only 40 Chapters under the Connecticut 
Grand Chapter, and as the Grand Chapter itself is 
120 years old, we infer that Pythagoras Chapter, No. 
17, Hartford, is by no means one of the oldest ; it 
reached, however, the century mark in October, 1917, 



xx APPENDIX 

and its 100th anniversary was celebrated on the 5th 
October, by a banquet and speeches. The Grand High 
Priest was present. The assembled company listened 
to an historical address given by Isaiah Baker, Grand 
Treasurer and Past Grand High Priest, which is said 
to have been "very complete and most interesting." 

This address is printed in full in the Grand Chapter 
proceedings. 

The Chapters were visited and inspected by the 
principal officers of Grand Chapter. 

The Grand Treasurer reported a balance on hand 
of $5,251.22, being an increase of about $20 over the 
balance of the previous year. 

The Grand Secretary reported a membership of 
10,401 in the 40 Chapters ; net gain in a year 234. 

The part which the Past Grand High Priests play 
in this Grand Chapter is noticeable. 

George A. Kies, now Grand Secretary, is also the 
author of the Correspondence Report, which begins 
thus : — 

"How the years fly ! The Grand Chapter (not to 
mention the Capitular world) has endured the writer 
until now, when we have the honour to submit our 10th 
(and last) Annual Report of what seems to us of value 
in the proceedings of other Grand Chapters. We 
follow the same old ruts, proceeding alphabetically 
with, first the U.S. Grand Chapters, and following 
with the Foreign Grand Bodies." 

We have referred on previous occasions to the good 
work of Comp. Kies, and are sorry to lose him as a 
reviewer. Perhaps he may be induced to reconsider 
his resolution to retire. His place will not easily be 
filled. 

In this Report, he has not included Canada among 
the "Foreign Bodies," nor has he (even by error) 
placed it among the United States Grand Chapters. 
It is not there at all, though Alberta, Nova Scotia, and 
Quebec are in the lime-light. 

The Report concludes with best wishes to brother 
correspondents, and these added words : — 

"In view of the present world-demoralisation, it 
is difficult to judge accurately as to Capitular condi- 



APPENDIX xxi 

tions. But it is safe to predict that, when the world 
returns to calm sanity (as it surely will at some time), 
Masonry will be found to be strong in well-doing for 
the uplift and general good of the human race." 

William R. Keavaney, 185 Bunker Hill Ave., 
Waterbury, Grand High Priest. 

George A. Kies, Hartford, Grand Secretary. 

Delaware. 

The year 1918 was an important one in the history 
of Royal Arch Masonry in Delaware. The Grand 
Chapter as now existing was constituted in 1868, and 
therefore 1918 was its jubilee year. The first Grand 
Chapter in Delaware was established in 1817 or 1818 ; 
and so 1918 was also, in a sense, a centennial year. 
The actual introduction of Royal Arch Masonry into 
Delaware was earlier than 1817. In an "Historical 
Sketch of Capitular Masonry in Delaware," by Stuart 
J. Horn, P.G.H.P., printed in the volume of proceed- 
ings for 1918, it is said that the first record of a Chapter 
of Royal Arch Masons in that State is given in the 
minutes of Washington Royal Arch Chapter of Super- 
Excellent Royal Arch Masons, held on the 24th Janu- 
ary, 1806, in the Borough of Wilmington, under the 
authority of a warrant from the Grand Lodge of 
Delaware. 

Grand Chapter met in Wilmington on the 16th 
January, 1918, for its 50th Annual Convocation. 
Canada's representative near the Grand Chapter of 
Delaware, Grand High Priest George S. Scott, presided. 
His portrait and a brief sketch of his Masonic career 
preface the volume of proceedings. He is a young man, 
having been born in Pennsylvania in 1877. His 
address was an excellent one. We quote the ex- 
ordium : — 

"A few years ago Royal Arch Masonry asked me, 
' What part of the work are you willing to undertake ? ' 
and received my answer, 'Any part, even the most 
servile, to promote so noble and glorious a work.' At 
that point I began my labours, with crow, pick, and 
spade, and in a comparatively short time I was rewarded 
with the highest gift in possession of the Companions 



xxii APPENDIX 

to grant, that of Grand High Priest ; and thus it comes 
that to-day I am permitted to extend to you a most 
hearty and cordial welcome to the 50th Annual Convo- 
cation of Royal Arch Masons of Delaware and the 
Centennial Anniversary of the introduction of Capitu- 
lar Masonry into Delaware. 

"The 12 months intervening since my election last 
January seem to be but as many weeks. How it re- 
minds us of the shortness of life and the uncertainty 
of its continuance ; yet, through the goodness of the 
Supreme High Priest, are we permitted to meet again 
in Annual Convocation to review the work of the past, 
consider what is best for the present, and plan for the 
future. 

"It is with considerable pleasure and satisfaction 
that I can report the past year to have been one of the 
most successful in the history of this Grand Chapter. 
Peace and harmony have prevailed in all the subordin- 
ate Chapters, and an evidence of prosperity is seen in 
the large increase in our members during the year." 

The above was the only reference which the address 
contained to the double celebration. The celebration 
proceedings were of a more public character and took 
place in a large hall in Wilmington on the evening of 
the day of meeting. 

The passing of two eminent members of Grand 
Chapter, Past Grand High Priest J. Harmer Rile and 
Past Deputy Grand High Priest Frank C. Melvin, was 
fittingly deplored. 

The Grand High Priest departed, as he said, from 
the usual custom of making one official visit to each 
subordinate Chapter during the Capitular year. The 
Jurisdiction being small, he felt it incumbent upon him 
to make as many informal visits as possible, and in 
this manner get the Chapters into closer touch with 
the Grand Chapter. 

The work or ritual is apparently very capably 
taught and supervised in Delaware by a Grand In- 
structor and a Committee on Work, who devised a 
plan for a School of Instruction, which was approved 
by the Grand High Priest and on his recommendation 
adopted by Grand Chapter. 



APPENDIX xxiii 

Of the 4 constituent Chapters, 3 are at Wilmington 
and 1 at Georgetown. The total membership on the 
17th January, 1917, was 1,273. During the year 122 
Masons were exalted and 3 affiliated, 22 died, and 5 
demit ted. The membership on the 16th January, 1918, 
was, therefore, 1,371, and the net gain 98. 

The Report of the Centennial Committee, pre- 
sented at this Convocation, was as follows : — 

"Your Committee appointed to provide a suitable 
celebration to mark the 100th anniversary of the in- 
troduction of Capitular Masonry into Delaware, have 
performed that duty to the best of their ability. Ow- 
ing to the stringency of war-times we deemed it in- 
advisable to have a banquet. We have therefore made 
a literary programme for a meeting to be held in the 
Auditorium of the High School, and are to be honoured 
by having Companion Thomas R. Marshall, Vice- 
President of the United States, to address us. The 
Committee will make a complete report at the next 
Communication of this Grand Chapter." 

Anticipating the Report, the volume contains the 
historical sketch already alluded to, and reports of the 
addresses made at the evening meeting, at which not 
only Masons, but other citizens, including many ladies, 
were present. Comp. Marshall, Vice-President of the 
United States, made a notable speech. This was one 
of the many good things he said : — 

"I don't know much about Wilmington. The little 
I do know about it is all to the good, but I have an 
idea that there are dead men in Wilmington who will 
be walking around Wilmington to-morrow having a 
good time. I hold that any man is dead who has not 
some high ideal planted in his soul towards the attain- 
ment of which he is urging all mankind to follow. He 
may live to be three score years and ten, if you call 
living, eating, drinking, and sleeping — but, if he 
has nothing to worship except himself, no object ex- 
cept his own interests, and is unwilling to make sacri- 
fices for his fellow-men, that man is dead. Any man 
or woman who could have subscribed to the Liberty 
loan and did not is dead. I hope he will be resurrected 
before the next loan is called. Any man or woman who 



xxiv APPENDIX 

could have subscribed for the Y.M.C.A. and did not, 
is dead, and I don't care to attend his or her funeral. 
On the other hand, no man ever dies who has given his 
life to some great purpose. George Washington is not 
dead to-night, my friends. He is more surely alive 
and with all the thought and purpose of humankind 
than he was when he knelt in prayer for his foot-sore 
soldiers in the snow at Valley Forge. Abraham 
Lincoln is not dead to-night. He lives. His vision 
grows larger and larger upon the horizon of the Repub- 
lic, and it will continue to grow larger as long as men 
love liberty. Joan of Arc is not dead. No, ladies 
and gentlemen, she listens again in Domremy for the 
voices, and I think she hears the voices of the men of 
America who are saying 'We are coming once again, 
Joan of Arc, across the seas to save the land you loved 
and that once loved us.'" 

The celebration appears to have been a great 
success. 

There is a very good Report on Correspondence by 
Comp. Thomas J. Day (his second). The proceedings 
of 55 Grand Chapters are reviewed, Canada (1917) 
being one. 

Leon Walker, Wilmington, Grand High Priest. 

Stuart J. Horn, P.O. Box 94, Wilmington, Grand 
Secretary. 

England and Wales. 

We are not favoured with any account of the pro- 
ceedings of the Grand Chapter ; but the printed pro- 
ceedings at the Quarterly Communications of the 
Grand Lodge of Mark Master Masons of England and 
Wales and the Colonfies and Dependencies of the 
British Crown are sent to us with great regularity. 
Unfortunately there is little in them which, in our 
opinion, would interest readers of this report. R.W. 
Bro. Loveland Loveland, Deputy Grand Master, is still 
on the throne, in the absence of the Grand Master, and 
excellent charitable work is done and recorded. The 
Quarterly Communications of which we have reports 
before us are those of the 4th December, 1917 ; the 
5th March, 1918 ; the 4th June, 1918 ; and the 3rd 
September, 1918. 



APPENDIX xxv 

H.R.H. The Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, 
Grand Master. 

Arthur David Hansell, Mark Masons' Hall, Great 
Queen Street, London, W.C. 2, Grand Secretary. 

Florida. 

We confess to a feeling of disappointment when we 
open a new volume containing the proceedings of a 
Grand Chapter and find a portrait of the Grand High 
Priest and then his address, the principal feature of 
the proceedings, but no account of the man. This 
feeling is emphasised where the portrait indicates — as 
it often does — high intellectual gifts and where the 
matter of the address bears out the indication. Of 
Dabney B. Palmer, Grand High Priest of the Grand 
Chapter of Florida, who presided at the 72nd Annual 
Convocation, held in the City of Jacksonville, on the 
21st and 22nd May, -1918, we should certainly like to 
know more. His address is an excellent one. Of the 
war he speaks eloquently. We give just one para- 
graph :— 

"Who would have dreamed a little over one year 
ago that America could ever become the closely united 
nation it is to-day, welded and fused into a single 
purpose, sought by one hundred million hearts ? 
Could there be loyalty more clearly universal, when 
newcome vies with native in a thousand proofs of ardent 
patriotism ?" 

James Carnell, Grand High Priest of Florida in 1899, 
died on the 17th June, 1917. He was born in Leicester, 
England, on the 30th September, 1849. The presiding 
Grand High Priest paid this tribute to the memory of 
his eminent predecessor : — 

"He was one of the fairest-minded men I have ever 
met. He was just, and he believed that all his fellows 
possessed the same virtue. He was generous. He 
knew that men were human and liable to err. He was 
honest. He did what he thought was right and then 
clung to it. Moreover, he was a gentleman and a 
Mason. He was kind and considerate. He was at 
all times modest and retiring, yet he rememberd the 
dignity of his position in life. He belonged to that 



xxvi APPENDIX 

old-fashioned, honest, class of gentlemen that is fast 
disappearing." 

The Grand Treasurer's Report shows a healthy 
financial condition — there is a surplus of nearly $12,000, 
most of it invested, part of the investment being in 
U.S. Liberty bonds. 

There are 36 subordinate Chapters, with a total 
membership of 2,983 ; net gain in a year, 243. 

The Report of the Committee on Fraternal Corres- 
pondence is again presented by Comp. Ely P. Hubbell. 
It is able and comprehensive ; the learned and careful 
reviewer has taken great pains to bring out all that is 
important or interesting in the proceedings of each 
Grand Chapter. Canada (1917) receives a due share 
of attention. We quote Comp. Hubbell's conclusion, 
with which we are in complete sympathy, our own ex- 
perience being similar to and almost as recent as his 
own : — 

"For some reason the 1917 proceedings of Virginia, 
New Brunswick, and New Zealand have failed to reach 
us. All the others, with scarcely an exception, report 
substantial increase in membership. The only element 
of discord noticeable is the gradual severing of fraternal 
relations with Scotland. Although war in some form 
is the all-absorbing topic, yet we have refrained from 
referring to it, for the reason that nothing we could 
write will mitigate its horrors or change its course. 

"Each year some of the Grand Chapters decide to 
make the minor offices elective and others are seriously 
considering so doing. This is a proceeding 'which is 
in keeping with the prevailing democratic tendencies 
of the times. The appointive system makes it possible 
for the retiring High Priest to select his successor. 

"It was with many misgivings that we took up the 
work of preparing a Correspondence Report, and with 
something approaching heart-failure we turned to see 
what our Companion Knights of the Round Table had 
to say of our 'first offence.' The returns so far re- 
ceived indicate that our work will pass inspection and 
entitle us to wages. If we were engaged in starting 
a new enterprise, a newspaper for instance, doubtless 
we would 'feature' what our contemporaries had to 



APPENDIX xxvii 

say of us with appropriate 'scare-heads.' As it is, we 
have referred briefly, if at all, to the many expressions 
of approval, but we nevertheless sincerely thank you, 
Companions, for your kind words." 

Charles H. Ketchum, Key West, Grand High Priest. 

Wilber P. Webster, Jacksonville, Grand Secretary. 

Georgia. 

The Grand Chapter of Georgia met in Annual Con- 
vocation in the Convention Hall of Dempsey Hotel, 
Macon, on the 25th April, 1917, and was in session for 
two days. Thomas H. Jeffries, Grand High Priest, 
presided. He began his address with a reference to 
world-conditions, using these words : — 

"We have come upon a time in the world's history 
the like of which the world has never experienced before. 

"The things for which Freemasonry stands are being 
put to a test such as they have never before undergone. 
Shall the inherent right of individual sovereignty sur- 
vive and prevail or shall free men bow their necks to 
the yoke of the oppressor ? The boast of Freemasonry 
is individual freedom, freedom of opinion and con- 
science, freedom to follow the dictates of conscience 
and the judgments of intellect without the interference 
of any mortal man, be he priest or potentate. 

"So sure as God lives and rules, so sure as right is 
mightier than wrong, so sure as good shall prevail over 
evil, so surely shall the principles promulgated by 
Masonry dominate the hearts and minds of men and 
then rule and govern the world." 

On the 4th June, 1917, died R. E. Comp. S. H. 
Griswold, Grand Treasurer "for so many years," said 
the Grand High Priest, "that the oldest of us can 
scarcely remember who was his predecessor in office." 

The Grand Treasurer's taking was not the only 
breach in the official family of Grand Chapter. The 
sudden death of the Deputy Grand High Priest, R.E. 
Comp. W. L. Williams, on the 1st February, 1918, was 
also recorded. 

The Grand High Priest most feelingly testified to 
the sorrow of the Grand Chapter in regard to the double 
loss thus sustained. 



xxviii APPENDIX 

A liberal appropriation to the Masonic Home was 
recommended. 

Some general remarks upon loyalty and love of 
country made by the Most Excellent were most felici- 
tous. 

It may perhaps be impertinent to discuss the fin- 
ances of a stranger Grand Chapter, but we could not 
help being impressed with the Report of the Finance 
Committee, which was adopted. From the previous 
year there was a balance on hand of nearly $14,000 ; 
more than $12,000 was collected for dues ; and nearly 
$200 interest on deposits was earned. The principal 
items of expenditure are under two heads : "Expense 
of this Convocation," $2,500 ; and salary of Grand 
Lecturer, $1,800, salary of Grand Secretary, $900, 
travelling expenses of Grand Lecturer, $1,200. The 
expense of holding the Convocation seems very large, 
but it appears that the delegates have their expenses 
paid. We are glad to see that the one occupant of the 
two offices of Grand Secretary and Grand Lecturer, 
R.E. Comp. Edgar A. McHan, gets a reasonable salary 
and a fair allowance for expenses ; an additional sum 
of $1,200 was appropriated for a new motor-car for 
him — and that too seems very reasonab e ; he also has 
a stenographer — we assume an occasional one — at $200. 
The sum of $3,500 was appropriated to the purchase of 
Liberty bonds, and $2,500 worth of those purchased 
are to be given to the Endowment 'Fund of the Masonic 
Home. An appropriation of $100 each for payment of 
the expenses of attendance of delegates at the General 
Grand Chapter meeting in Baltimore was also made — 
the delegates not to exceed ten. . 

The Grand Chapter is a large one. There are 157 
Chapters, with a total membership of 10,689 ; net gain 
in a year, 852. 

The utmost harmony prevails. 

Well done Georgia ! 

Charles L. Bass, Chairman of the Committee on 
Correspondence, produces his 5th Annual Report. He 
limits his review to 30 Grand Chapters. We are not 
told on what principle he selects them. Canada is not 



APPENDIX xxix 

included ; the only British Grand -Chapter noticed is 
Quebec (1917). He appends a brief digest of decisions. 

Elliott W. Parish, Savannah, Grand High Priest. 

Edgar A. McHan, Macon, Grand Secretary. 

Idaho. 

The Grand Chapter of Idaho is still small, but 
growing. A year ago, reviewing the proceedings of 
the Convocation of May, 1916, we commented on the 
fact that the volume containing them was late in 
making its appearance — writing then in January, 1918, 
we might well have had a later volume before us. But 
now, Januarv, 1919, we have the; proceedings both of 
1917 and 1918. 

We take up first the proceedings at the 9th Annual 
Convocation held in Kellogg on the 21st and 22nd 
August, 1917. 

The Grand High Priest, M.E. Comp. Thomas M. 
Fleming, in his address, said : — 

"I am happy to report that the Chapters of this 
Jurisdiction with very few exceptions are active ; that 
prosperity obtains ; that the gain in membership has 
been a substantial one ; that harmony prevails ; that 
no question of difference for reference to the Com- 
mittee on Appeals and Grievances has presented itself ; 
that the most cordial relations continue to exist with 
our sister Jurisdictions." 

From the Grand Secretary's Report it appeared 
that this Convocation was postponed from May to 
August on account of serious floods in Kellogg and 
vicinity in the month of May. 

The Report of the Committee on Chapters shows 
19 chartered Chapters and one under dispensation ; 
total membership on the 30th April, 1917, 1,532 ; net 
gain in a year, 90. 

A charter was granted to Rupert Chapter, No. 22, 
hitherto working under dispensation. 

The Committee on Necrology reported "that the 
year now drawing to a close has witnessed an unusual 
draft upon the ranks of the Royal Arch Masons of 
Idaho ... no less than 31 having laid aside the tools of 
the Craft at the Divine behest." The most notable 



xxx APPENDIX 

death was that of Jonas W. Brown, a member of Boise 
Chapter, No. 3. "Perhaps no other Mason in the 
annals of our Jurisdiction or of the entire North- West 
is more sincerely revered . . . His temple was finished 
at the age of 91, after a life perfectly rounded out in 
every particular." 

In Comp. Edward L. Gauger, who prepared the 
"Review of Proceedings of other Grand Chapters," 
the Round Table has a promising recruit. He reviews 
the proceedings of 55 Chapters with care and circum- 
spection. Canada (1916) is one of the 55. In his 
"Conclusion" he says : — 

"The labour, though arduous, has been both plea- 
sant and profitable. I have endeavoured to collect 
such items of interest as I could, and present them in 
as clear a manner as possible, not venturing very far 
afield in the matter of criticisms, preferring rather to 
keep tight hold of the shore-lines until experience and 
a little greater knowledge of the customs and usages 
of the Craft have been obtained." 

The 10th Annual Convocation was held in the 
Masonic Temple, Pocatello, on the 16th and 17th May, 
1918 ; M.E. Comp. Homer David, Grand High Priest, 
presiding. In his address he said that the Craft was 
in a healthy conditon and harmonious, and in most 
sections alive to its opportunities. In some places, 
however, he found an apathy that indicated the lack 
of a healthy growth. He believed, that the condi- 
tions existing throughout the whole country were in a 
measure the cause ; but he also thought that at this 
time a redoubled effort should be made to counter- 
act unusual conditions. He recommended the estab- 
lishment of Schools of Instruction. This recom- 
mendation was approved by Grand Chapter. 

The number of chartered Chapters is still 20 ; the 
membership has increased to 1,608 ; the net gain is 76. 

Nineteen members of the Royal Craft in this Juris- 
diction had died during the year — two were mentioned 
as being prominent in the political and civil life of the 
State, namely, James H. Brady, late United States 
Senator, and John M. Haines, sometime Governor of 
the State of Idaho. 



APPENDIX xxxi 

The sum of $75 was appropriated for Red Cross 
subscriptions. 

Comp. Gauger is again in excellent form in his 
review of 51 Grand Chapters, of which Canada (1917) 
is one. This is his second review. He evidently has 
a keen pleasure in his work, and his appreciation of 
the excellences of stranger Grand Chapters grows with 
experience. 

He says, in concluding a capital review : — 

"As the printer is calling for copy, my conclusions 
must of necessity be short. The list comprises all of 
those proceedings which have been received, and the 
"journey" has been an unusually pleasant one. In 
my quotations, I have endeavoured to give to the 
Companions of Idaho the experiences of the Craft at 
large, in the various methods used to stimulate interest 
in Capitular Masonry. And the one particular factor 
which towers preeminently above all others, is the 
correct rendition of the ritualistic work and proper 
interpretation of the esoteric meaning. The social 
features which are often indulged in, brighten the 
occasion and have a very stimulating effect on the 
attendance. 

"The war is the all-absorbing topic which seems 
to have cemented the entire Fraternity the more firmly, 
as the very foundation-stone upon which our Order is 
constructed is being attacked, and it is the source of a 
great deal of satisfaction to all to know that all members 
from the youngest to the oldest are doing what they 
can to uphold the glorious traditions of that glorious 
banner, the beautiful Stars and Stripes." 

Albert A. Jessup, Boise, Grand High Priest. 

Lewis W. Ensign, Boise, Grand Secretary. 

Illinois. 

When we came to the volume of proceedings of the 
Grand Chapter of Illinois for 1917, we were appalled 
by its bulkiness. How were we even to skim — expert 
skimmer though we have become — through it all ? 
On a closer examination, however, we found that the 
Grand Chapter had been revising its Constitution and 
By-laws, and had seen fit to bind up the revised articles 



xxxii APPENDIX 

with the usual report of the proceedings ; and we also, 
upon a diligent perusal of the Grand High Priest's 
address, found a passage in which he gave high praise 
to the work of Comp. E. R. Turnbull, whose hand was 
the labouring one in the revision, and recommended an 
appropriation of $500 for the splended service rendered 
by the aforesaid Companion. This recommendation 
was approved by the Committee on Accounts and ad- 
opted by Grand Chapter. The great size of the volume 
is thus explained. 

This was the 69th Annual Convocation, and it was 
convened in the grand ball-room of La Salle Hotel, 
City of Chicago, on the 25th October, 1917. The 
Grand High Priest, James E. Jeffers, of whom we gave 
some account in our 1918 review, presided. 

Among distinguished visitors who were recived and 
duly honoured were : Charles C. Davis, Grand Master 
of the Second Veil of the General Grand Chapter of the 
United States, and personal representative of the 
General Grand High Priest for this occasion ; Joseph 
E. Dyas, Past General Grand High Priest ; Robert A. 
Woods, Past Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter 
of Indiana ; and Austin H. Scrogin, Grand Master of 
the Grand Lodge of Illinois. Excellent speeches were 
made by these eminent Craftsmen. 

The Grand High Priest's address was an able one, 
as one would expect. 

Referring to the dead in this and other Jurisdictions, 
he singled out for special mention the name of Robert 
L. McKinlay, "a wise counsellor, a devoted husband, 
father, and friend, a good man and Mason. He died 
on the 23rd January, 1917, having had a life of excep- 
tional activity, full of honour and usefulness." By pro- 
fession he was a lawyer, and he was a successful one. 
He was Grand High Priest of Illinois in 1903-04, "the 
year of his service being marked by unusual .growth 
and harmony." 

During the year dispensations were issued for the 
formation of two new Chapters, both in Chicago, and 
named respectively "America" and "Niagara." 

M.E. Comp. Jeffers expressed his unqualified 
approval of the excellent system of district inspection 



APPENDIX xxxiii 

that had been established. "Efficiency and system in 
handling the affairs of the Chapters, the proper keeping 
of records, a correct knowledge, uniformity, and seri- 
ousness of the degree ceremonies, enthusiasm and 
interest in Chapter affairs, have been the net results of 
the official visits of the Inspectors." 

Coming next to Schools of Instruction, he says that 
they have been of incalculable value to Royal Arch 
Masonry in Illinois. 

Many other subjects were discussed in the Grand 
High Priest's comprehensive address : Grand Lectur- 
ers, who are appointed after examination by a Board of 
Grand Examiners ; the Illinois Masonic Hospital 
Association ; the . Royal Arch Memorial Hospital ; 
the General Grand Chapter of the United States 
of America, which was to meet, and did meet, not in 
Washington, but in Baltimore, in October, 1918 ; and 
investments in Liberty loan bonds. 

The remarks made upon the official duties of a 
Grand High Priest are of universal application and we 
quote them with emphatic concurrence : — 

"The duties of the office of Grand High Priest, 
while not a great burden, are of considerable volume 
and importance, and require no little time and con- 
sideration, in the performance of which I have taken 
keen interest and pleasure. No question or corres- 
pondence, however insignificant or whence its source, 
but has received the same consideration and care as 
those of greater importance from the most prominent 
of the Craft. 

' ' In each and every instance I have tried to place 
myself in sympathy and accord with the Companion 
seeking information and to be of every service I could, 
believing it to be my duty, rather than to complain of 
the many unimportant questions and correspondence ; 
and in the doing of this I have found both profit and 
pleasure. 

11 I do not say it in a spirit of criticism, my Com- 
panions, but I have little patience with that Companion 
who, once in official line, accepts each successive year 
an advance in office and additional honours until he 
is finally crowned with the highest official position, and 



xxxiv APPENDIX 

then burdens his Annual Report with a complaint of 
the duties he has to perform in answering easy questions 
and useless correspondence. 

"Questions and correspondence concerning the 
affairs of the Chapter indicate an interest in Royal Arch 
Masonry ; and, however unimportant, is to be encour- 
aged rather than made an object of complaint. 

"In my short experience and limited observation 
I do not recall a single instance of these dignified and 
honoured offices being forced upon any Companion. 
On the contrary, I have heard it whispered that there 
have been times when the office did not seek the man, 
but rather that the reverse was the case. How in- 
consistent, then, that having attained the high position 
he should complain of its duties. This, my Com- 
panions, is my conception of the duties and obligations 
of the Grand High Priest, and to that end have my best 
efforts been directed." 

The reports of the Inspectors of the 27 districts 
into which the jurisdictional area is divided take up a 
considerable part of the large volume of proceedings. 
Efficiency and progress are well marked. 

The Grand Treasurer reported total receipts for the 
year, $56,389.31 ; total payments on orders, $30,312.37; 
balance on hand, $26,076.94 ; invested funds, $20,000. 

The financial and statistical statements are made 
up to the 30th June, 1917. On that day there were 
215 active Chapters, with a total membership of 
45,737 ; increase in a year, 2,147. 

The Committee on Accounts made some interesting 
recommendations as to the disposal of the funds of 
Grand Chapter, and all were approved and adopted. 
The most notable were these : — 

$5,000 to be used for the support and maintenance 
of the Royal Arch Memorial Hospital at Sullivan, 
Illinois. 

$500 to the Illinois Masonic Hospital Association. 

$1,000 to the American National Red Cross. 

$5,000 to be invested in Liberty bonds. 

$700 for the expenses of official representatives of 
the Grand Chapter attending the Triennial Convoca- 
tion of the General Grand Chapter. 



APPENDIX xxxv 

$500 for Comp. Turnbull's revision of the Constitu- 
tion and By-laws. 

Grand Chaplain H. E. Neff addressed the Grand 
Chapter, taking as his text the words "Without Hope 
of Fee or Reward." His address was rightly described 
by M.E. Comp. George M. Moulton as a "gem in 
Masonic literature." 

Arthur E. Wood was elected and installed as Grand 
High Priest for 1917-18. Of him we shall hear more, 
no doubt ; but we are briefly informed (in pursuance 
of an excellent custom) what manner of man he is. He 
was born on a farm (somehow all the best men are born 
on farms) in Illinois in 1864 ; worked as a farmer till 
1893, when he moved to Gibson City, and has since 
lived there, being engaged in the grain business. He 
was made a Master Mason in 1891, and has attained 
rank in the Grand Lodge as well as the Grand Chapter. 
Companion Wood (whose portrait is given) "is held 
in the highest esteem both in business and fraternal 
circles. He is still in the prime of life ; it is only fair 
to assume that the future holds additional honours in 
store for him, and that they will be well-deserved seems 
equally certain." 

R.E. Comp. George W. Warvelle, Committee on 
Correspondence, as well as Grand Secretary, presents 
his 16th Annual epistle. 

In opening, he remarks (how truly !) that "the 
chronicler can address his pen only to what is presented 
to him in the year-books." To construct an entertain- 
ing story from this material, he opines, is not an easy 
task ; and, like a lawyer, he cites the views of some 
eminent reviewers upon this point. The proceedings 
of 54 Grand Chapters came within his ken. He follows 
his own peculiar (and excellent) plan of giving a brief 
notice of each Jurisdiction, and then launching out into 
a topical dissertation — the latter being far more en- 
tertaining, and even, we venture to think, more in- 
structive, than the former. When he comes to Canada 
he has before him our proceedings of 1917, of which he 
gives a very fair summary. Some of the subjects 
dealt with in the "Postscript" are : "When the sun 
goes Down," dealing with the Correspondents of other 



xxxvi APPENDIX 

Jurisdictions who have crossed the Bar ; Nights ;" 
" Capitular Protection ; " "The Social Hour ;" "Soli- 
citation ; " "Life Membership." 

Under the head of "Comps." he delivers his mind 
of a cherished grievance. He does not like "Com- 
panion" as a substitute for "Brother ;" and he detests 
the abbreviation of "Companions" into "Comps." 
We do not altogether agree with his argument ; while 
we have a general dislike to abbreviations, we find 
custom too strong for us. "Comps.," we fear, has, in- 
the vernacular, "come to stay." 

The old rivalry — a generous rivalry — as to which of 
the Grand Chapters shall have the biggest membership, 
is, as usual, one of the things dealt with by Brother 
(shall we say ?) Warvelle. There seems to be some 
doubt as to whether Illinois or Ohio is in the lead — but 
it is one of them. 

Need we say, in closing this perhaps too lengthy 
review of Illinois' Grand Chapter, that it stands well 
to the front not only in numbers but in excellence? 
Verily it abounds in good works. 

Arthur E. Wood, Gibson City, Grand High Priest. 

George W. Warvelle, Room 1901, Masonic Temple, 
Chicago, Grand Secretary. 

Indiana. 

We are greatly impressed by the 1918 proceedings 
of the Grand Chapter of Indiana. 

The Convocation, the 73rd Annual, was held in 
Indianapolis on the 7th and 8th November, 1918, 
having been postponed from October on account of 
the influenza epidemic. 

The volume containing the proceedings — we are 
taking up the Grand Chapters in alphabetical order, 
just as Mark Twain's pilot arranged to pay his creditors 
— is the first to advise us of what was done at the 
General Grand Chapter's Triennial Convocation of 
October, 1918 ; and it is really the earliest publication 
in a new era, because the Grand Convocation was held 
just at the time of the armistice, It is thus inex- 
pressibly welcome, apart from its merits, which, as will 
be seen, are considerable. 



APPENDIX xxxvii 

The Grand High Priest, M.E. Comp. Elwood 
Barnard, mentioned in his address the Masonic Home 
at Franklin, Indiana. There is no debt upon the Home, 
but the Board is somewhat handicapped by the lack 
of available funds to increase the capacity, all rooms 
being full, and there being a waiting list of applicants 
for admission. He suggested that the Committee on 
Claims should consider the availability of funds, and 
that a suitable gift from revenue should be made. 

Circumstances over which he had no control pre- 
vented Comp. Barnard from attending the Triennial 
Convocation of the General Grand Chapter, which 
was held in Baltimore, beginning on the 2nd October, 
1918. He appointed as his proxy Calvin W. Prather, 
Past Grand High Priest and Grand Secretary, and 
Comp. Prather attended the Convocation and made 
a brief report, from which we learn several things : — 

(1) In the matter of the friction with the Grand 
Chapter of Scotland over the invasion of the Philippine 
territory, the General Grand High Priest made an 
effort at settlement, but failed in the attempt, and no 
results looking to the betterment of conditions were 
reached. 

(2) The Treasurer's Report showed a healthy 
condition of the finances of the General Grand Chapter. 

(3) A generous appropriation of $25,000 was made 
to the Red Cross, Y.M.C.A., and Salvation Army 
Funds ; the Masonic War Relief Fund was enriched by 
subscriptions to the amount of more than $16,000. 

(4) Leon T. Leach, a Past Grand High Priest of 
Indiana, was elected General Grand Master of the 
Third Veil ; Gustav A. Eitel, of Maryland, General 
Grand Treasurer, in place of Thomas J. Shryock, 
deceased ; and Frederick W. Craig, of Iowa, General 
Grand High Priest for the coming period of 3 years. 

(5) Raleigh, North Carolina, is the place fixed for 
holding the next Triennial Convocation. 

Coming back to Indiana, we find that the Grand 
Treasurer reports a balance on hand of $4,409.05, and 
an invested surplus of $10,000. 

The Grand Secretary's Report deals exhaustively 
with the affairs of the Grand Chapter. It appears 



xxxviii APPENDIX 

that on the 23rd October, 1918, there were 125 active 
Chapters, including 3 under dispensation. Charters 
for 2 of the 3 were granted at this Convocation. The 
total membership is placed at 21,678 ; the net increase, 
1,051, being slightly less than that of 1917, which was 
one of the largest in the history of the Grand Chapter. 
The Grand Secretary says that the increase is a matter 
for congratulation ; that peace and harmony have pre- 
vailed; and in the great work accomplished the spirit 
of loyalty and fraternity is very evident. 

The Grand Secretary writes also of the war and the 
contributions of Royal Arch Masons in Indiana to the 
Army and the war-chest. Indiana is well to the front 
in these respects also. 

The same Grand Officer, Calvin W. Prat her, was, 
as has already been said, the representative of his 
State Chapter at the Triennial Convocation of the 
General Grand Chapter. While there he presided over 
the Grand Secretaries Guild, of which he has been the 
head for 6 years. A sumptuous banquet was served 
to the Guild by the Companions in Baltimore. 

The Report of the Grand Inspector, M.E. Comp. 
John J. Glendening, is full and complete ; it gives very 
interesting details of the work. 

Appropriations aggregating $850 were made in 
favour of the Indiana Masonic Home, the Red Cross 
Fund, the Y.M.C.A. Fund,. and the Salvation Army. 

In accordance with the usual custom, the annual 
dinner was given at 6 p.m. on the 7th November in the 
Grand Lodge banquet -room, and was the occasion for 
a patriotic demonstration. The news of the signing 
of the armistice had proved to be premature, and the 
great joy that had manifested itself at the noon lun- 
cheon was subdued ; yet, with the full belief and ex- 
pectation that it would be but a few days at most 
until the end of the war would come and hostilities 
cease, which was indeed' the case, as the event showed, 
the dinner was much enjoyed, and the Companions 
were delighted to hear Companion Charles A. Book- 
waiter, who delivered a most interesting and intensely 
patriotic address, well received by the large number of 
Companions present. 



APPENDIX xxxix 

This is the first note of Peace. It will be remem- 
bered that the premature report of the armistice came 
on the 7th November, and that it was signed on the 
11th. 

William W. Ross, of Evansville, was elected Grand 
High Priest at this Convocation, but was not present ; 
his installation at a later date was arranged for ; and 
in the volume before us we find his portrait, but no 
sketch of his life. 

In happy vein Past Grand High Priest Robert 
Archer Woods writes his "Annual Capitular Review." 
This, he tells us, is his 8th Capitular journey through 
the Grand Jurisdictions of the World. He recounts 
doings of 54 Grand Chapters, and adds crisp comments 
of his own. A good deal of space is given to Canada, 
and some compliments are paid. Comp. Woods again 
chides the present writer for not using different type 
to distinguish quotations from original matter. The 
dear man avers that when there is no change of type 
the task of reading is more difficult. We humbly 
think that the use of a special type for quotations is a 
fetish. We know no reason why reading should be 
made any easier for persons who can read. The plan 
advocated seems to us to savour of the kindergarten — 
we beg pardon, children's garden. 

Comp. Woods was at Baltimore for the Triennial 
Convocation, and does not fail to notice the Third 
Triennial gathering of the Correspondents of the 
Capitular and Cryptic Round Table at the Masonic 
Temple in Baltimore. He says that at noon on the 
3rd October, 15 Correspondents, with several dis- 
tinguished guests, sat down to luncheon. We quote : — 

"Informal talks were had from all those present ; 
the matter of consolidation with the Grand Secretaries 
Guild was by mutual consent dropped ; the continua- 
tion of the Round Table as first conceived was deemed 
wisest for our modest purposes, and M.E. Companion 
Robert A. Woods, Princeton, Ind., was elected President- 
Secretary-Treasurer ; the "whole cheese," as some 
waggish Scribe put it. The funds in the Treasury are 
sufficient to run the organisation for several years 



xl APPENDIX 

without further assessment of dues ; postage and 
stationery being the only expense. 

11 Our object : to meet face to face, renew old and 
form new friendships, and thus lead to better under- 
standing of the individual and the consequent enlarge- 
ment and betterment of our ideals." 

We quote also the concluding words of this well- 
equipped reviewer : — 

" My annual peregrination is finished. To sum up 
briefly, it may be said that the growth and prosperity 
of Capitular interests in the past year have been phen- 
omenal, when one considers the almost cataclysmal 
conditions now confronting us, and which in themselves 
demand and receive abnormal attention. Surely we 
have great cause for rejoicing. Within our borders 
peace and harmony prevail, and everywhere we see the 
cope-stone brought forth with song and praise. So, in 
due time, will it be in the world at large. Until then, 
denial, work, prayer — as becometh those who build a 
spiritual Tabernacle where Truth, Justice, Equity, and 
Equality shall abound." 

William W. Ross, Evansville, Grand High Priest. 

Calvin W. Prather, Indianapolis, Grand Secretary. 

Iowa. 

"Transactions of the Grand Chapter of Iowa at 
its 64th Annual Convocation, convened at Cedar 
Rapids, Thursday, October 11, A.D. 1917," which is a 
long time ago ; not a great while after the United 
States entered the war, and 13 months before the arm- 
istice, from which we date a new era. But these 1917 
proceedings are the latest product of the Iowa Jurisdic- 
tion at the time we are writing, January, 1919 ; and, 
as we did not receive them in time for review in our 
report of 1918, why up and at 'em now. 

The first thing which strikes one in the volume is 
the portrait of Charles Almon Dewey, the presiding 
Grand High Priest. He looks like a man of about 40 
and has all the mafks of a lawyer in his face ; and, on 
turning to p. 485, we find that he is a lawyer, and that 
he was born in 1877, and so is even now not much more 
than 40. The brief biography of "one who is endowed 



APPENDIX xli 

with those qualities which induce men to call him a 
leader" is written by Amos N. Alberson, P.G.H.P. 
"The name of Almon Ralph Dewey," he says, "is 
still familiar to Iowa Masons, because he was one of the 
few men who served as the executive head of all four 
of the York Rite Grand Masonic Bodies. To this 
illustrious man and his good wife, on the 11th Septem- 
ber, 1877, was born a son whom they christended 
Charles Almon. He was reared and schooled and is 
still living in Washington, Iowa." It is said that he 
has a large practice as a lawyer and devotes his spare 
time to the service of the public in many spheres of 
usefulness. His father (now deceased) was Grand High 
Priest for two years, his second term finishing in 1881 ; 
the son was installed in 1916. 

In his address to the Grand Chapter, speaking of 
the war, he said : — 

"One thought that gave me great satisfaction ... is 
that, made up as we are of the most heterogeneous 
population of any nation in the world to-day, made up 
as we are of peoples speaking the language and living 
the customs of practically every nation on earth, we 
went to war with less internal disturbance than any 
nation that has so far entered into this great conflict." 

Continuing he said : — 

"This has been an unusual year in the history of 
Capitular Masonry, as even the great work of Masonry 
is overshadowed and made secondary in the minds of 
all to the matters of world-wide interest which have 
been sweeping us into new conditions, new relations, 
and important changes. For this reason the work of 
the office of the Grand High Priest has been relieved 
from many minor labours. Events of so great impor- 
tance to us all are happening with such startling rapid- 
ity that there is no time or disposition on the part of 
anyone to engage in strife or dissension of minor im- 
portance. However, there has been the usual detail 
work ; and, although no great stir has been made over 
it, the Grand Chapter has had a normal and substantial 
increase, and Capitular Masonry in Iowa has kept 
pace with all other lines of endeavour, and no diminution 
of interest has been shown in the work of the Chapters 
by reason of the war. 



xlii APPENDIX 

"Always on these occasions our first thoughts are 
with the absent members. We are more thn usually 
fortunate this year in counting the return of all the 
Grand Officers and the great body of Companions who 
report regularly at the Grand Chapter for inspiration, 
encouragement, and advice. Among the noticeable 
absentees is our Illustrious Companion, C. D. McEl- 
vain, who died at his home in Red Oak, Iowa, on the 
12th July, 1917. He had accepted the appointment of 
chairman of the Committee on Credentials of this 
Grand Chapter, and his work at home as well as in 
the Grand Bodies has made him known and loved by 
a great host of friends, who sincerely mourn his loss." 

The General Grand High Priest, M.E. Comp. 
George E. Corson, was invited to this Convocation, 
but was unable, on account of his official duties in the 
War Department at Washington, to attend. He was 
represented by the Deputy General Grand High Priest, 
Frederick W. Craig, now General Grand High Priest, 
and a Past Grand High Priest of Iowa. 

The Report of the Grand Treasurer showed a bal- 
ance on hand of $17,400.84, nearly $3,000 more than 
the balance at the end of the previous year. 

The Report of the Grand Secretary, R.E. Comp. 
O. F. Graves, was a very encouraging one. " All 
subordinate Chapters," he said, "have reported and 
paid their dues in full. The net increase in membership 
is 969, the largest in the history of this Grand Chapter." 
There are 127 Chapters ; 87 show a gain of 1,058 ; 
30 show a loss of 89 ; 10 Chapters show no change. 
The total membership on the 31st December, 1916, 
was 15,603. 

The following were among the money appropria- 
tions made at this Convocation : — 
Grand Chapter Charity Fund, 5 per cent. 

of gross receipts $ 543 .31 

Grand Chapter Charity Fund, interest re- 
ceived by Grand Treasurer 434 . 24 

Pay-roll of Grand Officers, Past Grand 

Officers, and Committees ;"". 970. 81 

Pay-roll of Grand Chapter delegates 1,273.35 



APPENDIX xliii 

Expenses of 4 delegates to the meeting of 

General Grand Chapter $ 1,500.00 

For the purchase of Liberty bonds 3,000.00 

Donations to Red Cross work, Masonic War 
Relief, and other worthy causes 1,000.00 

The Report on Correspondence was the work of 
Comp. F. A. Lee, of Waverly, Iowa, who humorously 
describes himself as having been "conscripted" for 
the job. He did it in a hurry, but by no means badly. 
Indeed, the conscripted recruit may in time become 
the general of the Correspondence Corps. He mar- 
shals 40 Grand Chapters in review order. Among 
them is Canada, not 1916, as he apparently thinks, 
but 1917. He evidently took the date "September 12, 
1916," which was the date of a Special Convocation, 
as the date of the Convocation at which the proceedings 
he reviews was held ; the true date was February, 1917. 
He is also mistaken in saying that the index is in the 
middle of the book; it is in its proper place — at the end 
of the prcceedings, but before the Appendix. Put 
it down to haste. We hope Comp. Lee will be heard 
from again ; and that, while not abandoning the 
judicious use of the scissors and paste-pot, he will give 
us more of his own ideas — it will be all the better if 
they are humorously expressed, as seems probable. 

Isaac T. Forbes, Marshalltown, Grand High Priest. 

O. F. Graves, Harlan, Grand Secretary. 

Ireland. 

In our 1917 review we included the Report for 1915 
of the Grand Royal Arch Chapter of Ireland. The 
Report for 1916 never reached us. We have now the 
Report for 1917, in a neat little volume. Interest in 
Ireland at the present time (January, 1919) is general 
and strong ; but we do not find in the record before us 
anything to throw light upon the "Condition of Ire- 
land" in 1917. Indeed it might be inferred from the 
report that nothing but harmony and prosperity was 
to be found. It must be remembered that the body of 
Royal Arch Masons in Ireland is made up of what 
would be termed on one side "the loyal minority" and 



xliv APPENDIX 

on the other "the foreign garrison." There appear to 
be 241 subordinate Chapters under the jurisdiction of 
the Grand Lodge of Ireland, and all are not in Ireland. 
There are Chapters at Colombo (Ceylon), Gibraltar, 
Johannesburg, and other outposts of Empire. Six 
new Chapters were constituted in 1917 — all in Ireland. 
The Report before us is not the Report of Proceedings 
at a Grand Convocation or Convocations, but the 
Grand Registrar's Annual Report. With us the 
Grand Registrar's office is a sinecure, but in Ireland 
they make him work. The head of the Grand Chapter 
is called "Grand King." There is a Deputy Grand 
King — in 1917 a new one was installed, Col. William 
Taylor, M.D. The Grand King is a quasi-permanent 
officer, usually a peer. The Grand Treasurer is also — 
as with us — a quasi-permanent officer. V.E. Comp. 
Oliver Fry, who has served in that capacity for seven 
years, has been photographed in full Masonic dress, 
for the frontispiece of the volume. There are 5 Dis- 
trict Grand Chapters, viz., Antrim, Armagh, Down, 
Londonderry, and Munster ; each is ruled by a District 
First Principal. From Munster and Londonderry 
there were no reports. 

The Grand Registrar's Report states : — 

"It is gratifying to record that the progress of Irish 
Freemasonry during the past year was one of unpre- 
cedented prosperity, particularly in the Royal Arch. 
The number of new members who were exalted is 
considerably in excess of any previous year, and the 
receipts are correspondingly greater. The previous 
record was held for the year 1914, when the amount 
received from all sources reached £830 2s. 9d., whereas 
the total for 1917 amounts to no less than £1,038 15s. 
8d. In January a sum of £300 was invested in War 
Loan, representing the surplus balance of the preceding 
year, notwithstanding which, on the 31st December, 
the auditors were able to certify to the very substantial 
balance of £599 lis. Id. to the credit of Grand Chapter 
accounts." 

Lord Muskerry, Grand King. 

H. E. Flavelle, Freemasons' Hall, Dublin, Grand 
Registrar. 



APPENDIX xlv 

Kansas. 

The Kansas reports are always interesting. The 
53rd Annual Convocation was held in Topeka, on the 
18th February, 1918. Grand High Priest Charles A. 
Conkling, the presiding dignitary, is presented to us by 
a photograph and a biographical sketch, from which 
we learn that he was born in Oswego County, New 
York, in 1857, and is a first cousin once removed of the 
famous Roscoe Conkling. His mother was a lineal 
descendant of General Schuyler, of Revolutionary War 
fame. As a boy, Charles Conkling worked on a farm 
in Illinois ; in 1876, he removed to Hutchinson, Reno 
County, Kansas, and became one of the early pioneers 
of Central Kansas. For 13 years he was a travelling 
salesman. He is now the proprietor of a successful 
hotel in Hutchinson. His Masonic career has been a 
distinguished one ; and, closely perusing his address, 
we are impressed with the excellent qualities of head 
and heart revealed in it. 

His first reference was to the dead in the Jurisdic- 
tion ; he made special mention of the two most promin- 
ent Companions who had died during his term of office. 

We find the death of Bestor Gaston Brown, Past 
Grand High Priest of Kansas, and Grand Scribe of the 
General Grand Chapter of the United States, noticed 
in nearly every volume of proceedings. It is best to 
refer to it in connection with his own Grand Chapter ; 
and Comp. Conkling's allusion to it is so feeling that 
we cannot do better than quote it. After giving the 
date as the 10th July, 1917, he says : — 

"Most Excellent Companion Brown's character 
had so many sides that were admirable, that to know 
them all was given to but those who enjoyed with him 
the pleasures of intimate and true friendship. 

"His sunshiny disposition and forgiving spirit, that 
never harboured a feeling of enmity, so nicely blended 
into his pleasing personality that we just had to love 
him. 

"As a Masonic student he was probably the peer 
of any living man, and some of us were indebted to him 
for what knowledge we have of the beauties of Masonry 
that lie behind mere ritualism. That he was especially 



xlvi APPENDIX 

well equipped to deal with questions affecting the in- 
terests of the Masonic Fraternity was shown by his 
wise counsel at all times, but particularly in the pre- 
liminary arrangements leading to the rebuilding of our 
Masonic Home. 

"A majority of us may not hope to fill his place here, 
but we all may hope and endeavour to leave behind us 
that which our friend left behind him — an unspotted 
reputation for fidelity to the trusts reposed in him and 
loyalty to his friends." 

The Grand High Priest then referred to : — 

"Right Excellent Companion Charles Henry Chand- 
ler, Grand Scribe of this. Grand Chapter, Past Most 
Worshipful Grand Master of our Grand Lodg«, and for 
many years State Architect, who passed out of this 
life Tuesday afternoon, December 18th, 1917. 

"During the years that we were associated together 
as officers of this Grand Chapter, I learned that Right 
Excellent Companion Chandler had formed a character 
according to the model embracing all the virtues of a 
manly man. 

"He was strict in integrity, splendid in training of 
mind and morals, honest of purpose, devoted to duty, 
strong in conviction, and conscientious in the advocacy 
of what he believed to be right. 

"The last time we met was on the occasion of laying 
the corner-stone of the Masonic Home, on November 
19th, 1917; I shall ever remember him as he appeared 
that afternoon — gentle, serene, courteous ; radiating 
the delightful urbanity which endeared him to all. 

"Within a month from that time this manly man 
had passed beyond the horizon of our view ; but the 
influence of his just, virtuous, and upright life will 
linger as a beautiful twilight in the memories of all 
who knew him." 

In accordance with a report adopted at the last 
Convocation, $5,000 had been paid to the Kansas 
Masonic Home, and contributions from the constituent 
Chapters to the amount of $1,635.20 had also been 
received and turned over to the Board of the Home. 

The corner-stone of the Home was laid on the 19th 
November, 1917. 



APPENDIX xlvii 

A contribution of $200 was made by the Grand 
Chapter to the American Red Cross Association. 

A beautiful new fireproof Masonic Office Building 
in Topeka was completed during the year. It contains 
a suitable and permanent place for the protection of 
the records of Grand Chapter and a commodious, 
well-furnished office for the Grand High Priest. 

The Grand Treasurer, M.E. Comp. Aaron H. Con- 
nett, reported a cash balance on hand of $13,450.20, 
and an invested surplus of $7,500. 

The Grand Secretary appends to his report an 
interesting table and diagram showing the number of 
Royal Arch Masons to each 1,000 Master Masons in 
each State. Rhode Island leads, nearly 50 per cent, of 
its Master Masons being also Royal Arch Masons. 

The membership of the Grand Chapter on the 21st 
December, 1917, was 11,766 ; there are 96 Chapters ; 
net gain in a year, 545. 

The financial appropriations made are not notice- 
able except that of $1,500 for the expenses of repre- 
sentatives of this Grand Chapter at the Triennial 
Convocation of the General Grand Chapter. 

There is an excellent Report on Correspondence by 
Matthew M. Miller, P.G.H.P.— his 10th Annual 
Report. There are reviews of the proceedings of 56 
Grand Bodies. We have in former reviews expressed 
our opinion of Comp. Miller's work, and it is sufficient 
to say that this report is as good as, if not better than, 
any of its predecessors. 

The Consolidated Statistical Appendix, prepared 
by Comp. Miller, gives some interesting figures. 

Herbert R. Hull, Kirwin, Grand High Priest. 

Albert K. Wilson, Topeka, Grand Secretary. 

Kentucky. 

We had no report of the Grand Chapter of Ken- 
tucky in our review published in 1918. In 1917 we 
had Kentucky of 1915 and 1916, and then noted that 
preparations were being made for the fitting celebration 
in 1917 of the Centennial of the Grand Chapter of 
Kentucky. We now have before us the proceedings of 
1917, in which the aforesaid celebration looms large, 



xlviii APPENDIX 

and there are some other important things to notice, 
which will give us cause to labour. But "the labour 
we delight in physicks pain," and. we enter upon it 
cheerfully. 

"The Grand Chapter of Kentucky, Royal Arch 
Masons, held its 100th Annual Convocation in the 
Masonic Temple, Louisville, commencing October 16th, 
1917, and was opened in ample form at 8 o'clock p.m." 
So runs the formal commencement. Of the 18 living 
Past Grand High Priests, 16 were present. M.E. 
Grand High Priest George B. Winslow presided and 
delivered an interesting address. 

He had been examining the printed proceedings of 
the Grand Chapter for the 100 years of its existence. 
In the earlier years he found no mention of an address 
by the Grand High Priest ; after a few years, an address 
covering half a page would appear ; year by year the 
length of the address had grown, until now the Grand 
Chapter either expected to be afflicted, or each Grand 
High Priest insisted on inflicting it, with some 25 or 
30 pages ! 

Past Grand High Priest James W. Hopper died on 
the 8th May, 1917, after many years of ill-health ; 
he was born in 1839 ; schoolmaster, lawyer, editor, 
poet, orator, and distinguished Mason ; he was Grand 
High Priest in 1897 ; a truly gifted son of Kentucky. 

Another notable death was that of Howard R. 
French, Grand Secretary and Past Grand High Priest, 
who departed this life on the 11th September, 1917, 
after an illness of only a few hours ; he was born in 
1847, was by profession a lawyer, and became a banker ; 
was Grand High Priest in 1882 ; and for many years 
prior to his death was president of the Old Masons' 
Home of Kentucky. 

Past Grand High Priest G. Allison Holland, well- 
known to us as this Grand Chapter's Correspondence 
Reviewer, was appointed Grand Secretary until the 
31st December, 1917, and was at this Convocation 
elected Grand Secretary. 

At the whole system of appointing Grand Repre- 
sentatives of a Jurisdiction to be "near" every other 
Jurisdiction, the Grand High Priest tilted vigorously 



APPENDIX xlix 

"I recommend," he said, "that all such appointments 
by the Grand Chapter of Kentucky be revoked, and 
that, so far as this Grand Chapter is concerned, no 
further attention be paid to this useless practice." 

This startling recommendation was referred to the 
Committee on Jurisprudence, who recommended ap- 
proval thereof. "After a spirited debate," says the 
record, "section 6 of the above report, relating to Grand 
Representatives, was nonconcurred in by the Grand 
Chapter." 

But here at last is a new subject for discussion. 
Let the Ancient Landmarkers be heard from ! 

A new method of making inspections was adopted 
at the previous Annual Convocation, and the Most 
Excellent reported that it had "worked well." Almost 
every Chapter in the State was actually visited in 
person by an Inspector or his deputy. The total 
expense of inspection upon the new plan, up to the 
25th September, 1917, was only $521.34, whereas it 
had run almost to $1,200 in some years, upon the old 
plan, when not half so many Chapters were inspected. 

The Grand Chapter having $21,000 invested in 
good securities, the Grand High Priest recommended 
that the securities be sold and the proceeds invested in 
Liberty Loan bonds. 

This recommendation was in part adopted. 

A very able and interesting address was closed with 
a few words about the war and the Masonic War Relief 
Association, of which the famous Kentuckian Bernard 
G. Witt, Past General Grand High Priest, is president. 

The Grand Treasurer, Frank H. Johnson, reported 
a cash balance of $11,997.37 on hand at the close of 
the fiscal year. 

The new Grand Secretary reported a net gain in 
membership of 93 during the fiscal year 1916-1917 ; 
this makes the total membership 9,922 for 113 Chapters. 

Most commendable attention is given to the subject 
of Masonic Homes. There are two in Kentucky — the 
Old Masons' Home, at Shelbyville, and the Widows' 
and Orphans' Home ; both are carefully inspected by 
a Committee of Grand Chapter, whose report appears 
in the proceedings. 



1 APPENDIX 

The Centennial Celebration took the form of a 
meeting of the members of the Grand Chapter on the 
evening of the 18th October, 1917, at one of the hotels 
in Louisville- — "The Hotel Henry Watterson" — where 
dinner was served and addresses commemorative of 
the important event were delivered. Souvenirs were 
prepared — bronze medallions, each bearing upon one 
face the likeness of the first Grand High Priest, James 
Moore, 1817-18-19, and on the other side the picture 
of the present Grand High Priest, with an appropriate 
inscription — and distributed at the dinner. Fac- 
similes are printed in the proceedings, and the speeches 
at the banquet are given in full. 

P.G.H.P. Bernard G. Witt, who presided, said : — 

"This is not the exact date of the Centennial, but 
is close enough to it for all practical purposes. To be 
accurate, representatives from Lexington, Frankfort, 
and Shelby ville Chapters met in Frankfort, on the 4th 
December, 1817, and resolved to form a Grand Chapter 
for the State of Kentucky, which they immediately 
proceeded to do. This action was approved by the 
General Grand High Priest, De Witt Clinton, on the 
30th December, 1817. This was the beginning of our 
Grand Chapter." 

An historical sketch was read by George B. Winslow, 
who had just laid down the gavel of Grand High Priest. 
The new Grand High Priest, Isaac T. Woodson, and 
other Companions made speeches. 

There were 250 Royal Arch Masons present. 

The "Report on the Doings of Grand Chapters," 
by G. Allison Holland, P.G.H.P. and now also Grand 
Secretary, is interesting and of course able ; 51 Grand 
Chapters are noticed. 

Under "Canada, 1917" Comp. Holland ventures 
the statement that the people of the United States are 
more democratic than those of Canada. We hope that 
our eminent coadjutor will visit us — many people come 
to us from the south in summer — and have his illusion 
dispelled. Canada, however, is well-treated by Comp. 
Holland, and we have every reason to be proud of his 
commendation. 



APPENDIX li 

We note that Past Grand High Priest George B. 
Winslow is to be Correspondent for 1918. 

Isaac T. Woodson, Louisville, Grand High Priest. 
G. Allison Holland, Lexington, Grand Secretary. 

Louisiana. 

The 71st Annual Grand Convocation of the Grand 
Chapter of Louisiana was held in the Masonic Temple, 
New Orleans, on the 5th and 6th February, 1918. 
John S. Thibaut, whose election and installation were 
recorded by us a year ago, presided and delivered a 
concise address. 

"Since last we met," he said, "conditions have 
arisen necessitating the entrance of our beloved country 
into the great conflict which a system antagonistic to 
the principles of Masonry has brought to the world. 
In this stupendous struggle its philosophy imposes 
upon it the mightiest responsibility and to it will give 
the most splendid opportunity for world-advancement 
it has ever had in its history. Let us hope that Free- 
masonry, true to its teachings, will not fail, but will 
eventually see the triumph of the principles for which 
it stands." 

Among the deaths recorded was that of Ex. Comp- 
D. B. Showalter, Grand Master of the Third Veil, 
which occurred on the 19th June, 1917. He was sud- 
denly stricken in the City of Alexandria, La., when he 
was only 53 years old. He was a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, a schoolmaster and at the time of his death 
Superintendent of Public Education in the parish of 
Rapides. 

The Grand High Priest said that he had refused to 
sanction the conferring of the Royal Arch degree with 
two substitutes — this ruling was in accordance with 
those of the General Grand Chapter ; but the Grand 
High Priest, for his part, did not understand the logic 
of permitting the degree to be conferred with one 
substitute and not permitting it with two. . The 
compliance with- the legendary requisite for the com- 
munication of the secrets was all that was necessary, 



Hi APPENDIX 

and that object was attained as well with two sub- 
stitutes as with one. 

The Report of the Grand Treasurer showed a cash 
balance on hand of $4,120.93, and an invested surplus 
of $11,000. 

There appear to be 45 constituent Chapters, one of 
them being not yet chartered, but doing good work ; 
the total membership is 4,479 ; net gain in a year, 247. 

The Report on Correspondence, like the address of 
the Most Excellent, is brief and concise. That is a 
merit, not a demerit, as some may suppose. We 
think the learned reviewer, Herman C. Duncan, 
P.G.H.P., who presents his 23rd Report, is quite right 
in what he says in conclusion, as follows : — 

"It has been the endeavour of your Committee to 
cull from the great mass of minutes that which we have 
deemed of interest to the Royal Craft of Louisiana. 
We have carefully avoided reference to the criticisms 
of other members of the Round Table, as of necessity 
dealing with matters that had received our attention a 
year or two previously. There was a time when we 
did so, but our experience soon taught us that it was 
wise, if we desired to have our reports read, to refrain 
from dealing with matters that were out of date, and 
above all to remember that busy men, such as are most 
of the Royal Craft, will not examine a lengthy report 
dealing largely with matters that do not concern them. 

"Your Committee is deeply grateful for the many 
kindly words that the scribes of such reports as these 
have written concerning our Chairman, and refer those 
who desire to know of them to the files on the shelves 
of our Grand Lodge Library." 

Canada (1917) receives its due share of notice. 

At his Convocation, E. H. Addington was elected 
and installed as Grand High Priest. We find his photo- 
graph in the front of the volume of proceedings, but 
no sketch of his personality. 

E. H. Addington, New Orleans, Grand High Priest. 

John A. Davilla, Masonic Temple, New Orleans, 
Grand Secretary. 



APPENDIX liii 

Maine. 

A perusal of the volume of proceedings of the Grand 
Chapter of Maine, at its 93rd Annual Convocation, 
held in Portland on the 7th and 8th May, 1918, dis- 
closes much that will interest Companions of other 
Jurisdictions. 

We begin with statistics, the most prosaic subject. 
There are 65 working Chapters ; none was chartered 
at this Convocation, and there is none under dispensa- 
tion. All the working Chapters made returns, and all 
but one made them in due time — which is perhaps a 
record. The membership on the 1st April, 1918, was 
11,145 ; net increase in a year, 211. 

Grand Chapter receipts, $3,229 ; disbursements 
(including $2,000 Liberty bond), $4,896.50. 

Amount of Charity Fund, $12,519.64 ; paid in 
Charity from income, $420. 

These figures are all given on one page, by way of re- 
capitulation from reports ; and that is well thought of. 

Frederic O. Eaton, M.E. Grand High Priest, 
opened the Convocation in ample form at the hour of 
7 p.m. on the first day. 

In the beginning of his address to the assembled 
Companions, he struck the war-note thus : — 

"We are free men and Free Masons, and as such it 
is our duty to devote all our energy, resources, and life 
itself to the cause of freedom for mankind." 

In speaking of the fraternal dead, he named two 
distinguished members of his own Grand Chapter : 
Augustus B. Farnham, Grand Representative of the 
Grand Chapter of California, who died in Bangor, on 
the 14th January, 1918 ; and Edwin F. Dillingham, 
Senior Past Grand Scribe, who died in Bangor, on the 
24th February, 1918. 

He was very frank about the condition of the Royal 
Craft :— 

"We are to be congratulated upon the substantial 
growth in membership which has been made, notwith- 
standing the abnormal conditions existing at this time. 

"The reports of the several inspecting officers will 
show that in general throughout our Jurisdiction, 
Capitular Masonry is in a prosperous condition. It 



liv APPENDIX 

is the exception, rather than the rule, when these 
reports do not indicate tht the ritual work and cere- 
monies have been rendered in an excellent manner. 
It is, however, rather difficult to summarise the reports 
without mentioning the apparent lack of interest in a 
few Chapters. You are informed that one Chapter 
has not conferred the Royal Arch degree since 1911 ; 
that another did not reply to any of the several com- 
munications sent by an inspecting officer ; and still 
others by dilatory methods failed to arrange dates for 
their inspections. Such conditions are not encourag- 
ing, but I am inclined to believe they can and will be 
overcome. I trust the Chapters to which the fore- 
going remarks apply will take prompt measures to 
carry this suggestion into effect." 

Schools of Instruction, Dispensations, Exchange of 
Representatives, the Triennial Convocation of General 
Grand Chapter, Changes in By-laws, and Inspections, 
were some of the heads under which the further remarks 
of the Most Excellent were grouped. 

The Reports of the Visiting Officers followed the 
address of the Grand High Priest. The work of visit- 
ing and inspecting the Chapters is shared in by the 
Grand High Priest himself ; the Deputy Grand High 
Priest, the Grand King, and the Grand Scribe, take 
the Chapters allotted to them ; and the four District 
Deputy Grand High Priests do the rest. 

There is in most Grand Chapters a Committee which 
reports on the Fraternal Dead. Sometimes it is called 
the " Committe on Necrology." The Grand Chapter 
of Maine has such a Committee, called the " Com- 
mittee on Memorials." We seldom allude to these 
reports, and we do so now only to express astonishment 
that it is found necessary to employ in them such trite 
phrases as "the Grim Reaper," the "Undiscovered 
Country," " Passed to the Beyond," et hoc genus omne. 
We feel free to make this remark a propos of the Maine 
"Memorials" report, because it is signed by M.E. 
Comp. Thomas H. Bodge, who in his Correspondence 
Report shows his ability to give us something better 
upon a great subject than a set phrase or two. He 
does not quote poetry ; but we almost wish he did 



APPENDIX lv 

because we feel sure that it would be an improvement 
on the wishy-washy verse we so often meet with. The 
grief of the Chairmen of these Committees in most 
Grand Chapters is about on a par with the grief of the 
undertaker — you cannot help feeling how conventional 
a thing it is. 

The Report on Correspondence appended to the 
proceedings of the Grand Chapter is the work of M.E. 
Comp. Bodge, and is, we understand, ' his second 
annual review. Last year we noticed what we took 
to be his first, and recorded our delight in it. This 
second one is no whit behind the first. 

It begins : — 

"Your Committee on Correspondence has perused 
each of the proceedings received from the other Grand 
Jurisdictions with which we are in fraternal communi- 
cation, and presents for your consideration, and we 
hope edification, extracts from and comments on the 
various matters recorded. 

"The first review by this Committee was most 
pleasantly received by those who took the trouble to 
tell their views ; but, if there are those who do not like 
our methods of treatment, we shall be glad to hear from 
them too, and their opinions shall have consideration. 
If our diagnosis has been wrong we wish to know it as 
soon as possible, and if we cannot hit on the right 
treatment you should call in another to take the case 
off our hands." 

Nobody could "say fairer nor that." 

Each one of 49 Grand Bodies receives most patient 
and courteous treatment. We share what we believe 
to be Comp. Bodge's opinion that there is something 
of interest to be found in every volume of proceedings 
— though we do not find "Decisions" as interesting as 
he apparently does. 

Canada (1918) is allotted a very considerable space 
and is treated with much courtesy and respect. 

Comp. Foster of Colorado started a hare for the 
Correspondence-hounds when he wrote : "In Mason- 
ry there are no Judges, Doctors, Professors ; we are 
all plain Brothers or Companions." This (in 1918) 
we quoted with approval. Comp. Bodge now comes 



lvi APPENDIX 

back at us, pointing out that "the Canadian Grand 
Scribe E. has given each his degree in several instances. 
Why advertise M.Ds. or Reverends more than bankers 
or merchants ?" Quite right ; we wish we could 
convert our R.E. Comp. Smith, Grand Scribe E. of 
the Grand Chapter of Canada, to our view. A prophet 
is not — the proverb is somewhat musty. 

Clifford J. Pattee, Belfast, Grand High Priest. 

Charles B. Davis, Portland, Grand Secretary. 

Maryland. 

The 120th Annual Convocation of the Grand 
Chapter of Maryland was held in Baltimore on the 
22nd November, 1917. 

The Grand High Priest, M.E. Comp. Emmett L. 
Pettit, in his address said that in the early part of the 
year he had called a meeting of the officers of the Grand 
Chapter, the Past Grand High Priests, and the High 
Priests of all the subordinate Chapters. The meeting 
was a large one. The Grand High Priest does not 
state definitely for what purpose the meeting was 
called ; but he does state that it resulted in the ap- 
pointment of a Committee "to take under considera- 
tion the advisability of celebrating the 120th year of 
the history of this Grand Chapter ;" and he goes on 
to say that the Committee "outlined a most excellent 
programme, which was sent to all the Chapters in the 
Jurisdiction with the request that they, as far as 
possible, carry out the same as outlined. The Com- 
mittee offered to co-operate in every way to make a 
success of any plan that the Chapters might decide 
upon to stimulate interest and increase the membership 
of the Chapters, as best suited to their individual needs. 
I take this opportunity to thank that Committee for 
their excellent work and commend them for the results 
which undoubtedly have been attained wherever this 
programme has been carried out." That is all. If there 
was a celebration, the nature of it remains to outsiders 
a mystery. 

The statistics for which we usually search are given 
conveniently by the Most Excellent in his address :— 



APPENDIX ivii 

"At the beginning of the year we had 4,268 Royal 
Arch Masons. Exalted during the year, 360 ; affili- 
ated, 12 ; reinstated, 2; losses by death, suspension, etc., 
145; net gain, 229 ; total membership, 4,497." (There 
are 24 subordinate Chapters.) 

Mention has been made, under "Kansas," of the 
death of M.E. Comp. Bestor Gaston Brown, a Past 
Grand High Priest of Kansas and Grand Scribe of the 
General Grand Chapter. He was a notable person, 
and at all Grand Convocations held after his death, 
which occurred in July, 1917, reference is made to him. 
He seems to have been remarkable for his great size 
and no less so for his vigorous mind. The Grand High 
Priest of Maryland tells us that Comp. Brown was 
"famed as a designer of Masonic costumes, parapher- 
nalia, and stage-settings ;" and Grand Secretary John 
H. Miller appends a foot-note : "Comp. Brown was 
said to be the original 'Buster Brown,' a sobriquet 
earned by him while a student at Cornell University, 
on account of his large size and propensity for playing 
tricks upon his fellow-students, and his name being 
Bestor." 

The other famous deceased of the period covered 
by this review was Thomas Jacob Shryock, a Past 
Grand High Priest of Maryland and Grand Treasurer 
of the General Grand Chapter. His death did not 
occur until the 3rd February, 1918 ; so that, in the 
volume now before us, he is frequently mentioned as 
an active participant in the doings of 1917. 

The Grand Treasurer's Report showed a balance 
on hand on the 22nd November, 1917, of $9,981.95. 

At the time of this Convocation it was understood 
that the General Chapter would meet in Washington, 
in October, 1918 ; and an appropriation of $3,000 was 
made for the purpose of defraying the expenses of the 
entertainment in Baltimore of the members of the 
General Grand Chapter for one day during the Trien- 
nial session, for which an invitation had been given and 
accepted. 

The Grand Council was authorised to invest $4,000 
in the purchase of Liberty bonds. 



lviii APPENDIX 

R.E. Comp. J. H. Ferd. Hahn was elected and 
installed Grand High Priest for the ensuing year. 

Pursuant to call, a Special Convocation of the 
Grand Chapter of Maryland was held in Baltimore on 
the 11th January, 1918, at which the new Grand High 
Priest presided.. 

It was explained by M.E. Comp. Shryock (whose 
sad death followed three weeks later) that, owing to 
war conditions in Washington, it was impossible to 
have the Triennial Convocation of the General Grand 
Chapter there ; and that he had invited the General 
Grand Chapter to Baltimore. His invitation was 
unanimously endorsed by the members of the Mary- 
land Grand Chapter ; a formal invitation was sent 
and accepted ; and the meeting was in fact held in 
Baltimore, in October, 1918. (See ante, under "Kan- 
sas.") 

The Report on Correspondence is again the work — 
and it is excellent work — of Comp. Henry Branch, a 
distinguished Divine. Canada (1917) is one of the 48 
Grand Chapters reviewed. 

A copy of the book of proceedings in 1918 reached 
us just before going to press (28th January, 1919). 

We find an account of a Special Convocation of the 
Grand Chapter of Maryland, held in Baltimore on the 
2nd October, 1918, for the purpose of "extending" 
(they are always "extending" in State Grand Chapters) 
an official and fraternal welcome to the General Grand 
Chapter. The speeches of M.E. Comp. J. H. Ferd. 
Hahn, of Baltimore, Grand High Priest of Maryland, 
and M.E. Comp. George E. Corson, General Grand 
High Priest, are given in full. 

The 121st Annual Convocation was held in Balti- 
more, on the 21st November, 1918. 

The Grand Treasurer's Report accounts for the 
surplus of $9,981.95 above mentioned, plus $4,610.72 
received during the year, altogether $14,592. Of this 
$4,000 was invested in Liberty Loan bonds, '$3,000 
was spent in entertaining the General Grand Chapter, 
and $2,905.75 in defraying ordinary expenses ; and 
with that a tidy balance of $4,686.92 was left for future 
consumption. 



APPENDIX lix 

There are still 24 subordinate Chapters, but the 
membership has risen to 4,767 — a net gain of 270 in 
the year. 

Grand High Priest Hahn read a commendably 
short address. Early in his year of office he met with 
a serious accident which so impaired his health that he 
could do little active work and had made but few visits. 
He was able, however, to report, with great satisfaction, 
that, although stress and turmoil had pervaded the 
nation, prosperity, harmony, and goodfellowship pre- 
vailed among the subordinate Chapters of this Grand 
Jurisdiction. 

The loss suffered by this Grand Chapter and the 
General Grand Chapter in the death of Thomas Jacob 
Shryock, Past Grand High Priest and General Grand 
Treasurer, was feelingly referred to. He was born in 
1851, was engaged in the timber business, and filled 
many important positions in the public service. His 
tenure of the office of Grand High Priest was in 1914 ; 
and in 1915 he was elected General Grand Treasurer. 
He died on the 3rd February, 1918. 

Another Past Grand High Priest of Maryland who 
died during the year was Charles B. Finley, who was 
born in 1846, and died on the 16th June, 1918. He 
was Grand High Priest m 1912. 

Reference was of course made by the Grand High 
Priest to the recent Triennial Convocation of the 
General Grand Chapter. He said that, personally, 
it was one of the most enjoyable experiences of his 
Masonic life. He felt sure that the entertainment, 
though modest, did not lack the true flavour of Mary- 
land hospitality. 

The Correspondence Report was again the work of 
E. Comp. Henry Branch, who is a clergyman, and, 
contrary to the Masonic etiquette we should like to 
see established, is styled "The Reverend," with the 
addition "D.D." A grave and reverend Doctor of 
Divinity is, however, in Masonry no more than a 
Brother or Companion. He reviews 42 United States 
Chapters and 7 British. The doings in "Canada" 
(1918) are briefly narrated. Indeed the whole report 
is highly condensed — the style is telegraphic rather 



lx APPENDIX 

than literary. We notice, among the "Standing 
Resolutions" of this Grand Chapter, one limiting the 
Report on Correspondence to 75 pages of printed 
matter. Comp. Branch, probably for good reasons, 
has cut this Report down to 51 pages. 

Oliver C. Warehime, 46 N. Market Street, Freder- 
ick, Grand High Priest. 

John H. Miller, Masonic Temple, Baltimore, Grand 
Secretary. 

Massachusetts. 

We have in the volume of proceedings of the Grand 
Chapter of Massachusetts for 1917 the records of four 
Convocations — for Massachusetts, venerable Grand 
Chapter as it is, retains the quarterly system. 

On the 13th March, 1917, a stated Quarterly Con- 
vocation was held in Ionic Hall, Masonic Temple, 
Boston, at which Arthur D. Prince, Grand High Priest, 
presided. A distinguished visitor, John A. Lang, Past 
Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter of New 
Hampshire, was received. A Committee to whom the 
address of the Grand High Priest at the Annual Con- 
vocation in December, 1916, had been referred, report- 
ed ; but there is nothing in the report which will interest 
outsiders. The Grand High Priest appointed a Com- 
mittee to prepare a suitable memorial of the life and ser- 
vice of an eminent Royal Craftsman, Theodore Henry 
Emmons, deceased. The Grand Secretary, J. Gilman 
Waite, P.G.H.P., was congratulated upon reaching his 
80th birthday. The Grand High Priest expressed the 
appreciation of the Companions of the Grand Secre- 
tary's "many years of devoted service to the Craft" 
and presented him with a sheaf of carnations to "glad- 
den the completion of his four-score years." 

At the Quarterly Convocation, held in the same 
place, on the 12th June, 1917, and presided over by the 
same Grand Officer, the memorial to Theodore Henry 
Emmons was read. He died on the 2 1st January, 1917 ; 
he was born in Boston, in July, 1829, and so had reached 
the age of 87. The remarkable thing about his con- 
nection with Royal Arch Masonry was, that he had 
never held high office, and yet no one had impressed 



APPENDIX lxi 

his personality more strongly on the character of the 
institution. He "was a true Mason," says the mem- 
orial. "He loved all its branches, but his chief interest 
was in the Capitular rite. He served St. Paul's Royal 
Arch Chapter as Secretary for more than 57 years, 
dying in harness. His long life reached back to the 
days of small beginnings. He knew the old workers 
when Masonry was loved and served for itself — when 
every Companion took pride in his knowledge of the 
ritual and traditions of the institution . . . His knowl- 
edge of the history of the Craft and his keen, discrim- 
inating insight as to values were recognised by Gen- 
eral Lawrence, who placed him in charge of build- 
ing up his Masonic library, which under Comp. Em- 
mons' guiding had become one of the finest in the coun- 
try ... In length of service as Secretary of his Chap- 
ter no doubt Comp. Emmons outranked all other Sec- 
retaries in the country." 

This makes good reading — it is the record of a life 
unselfishly and humbly devoted to service. 

The Grand High Priest made a stirring address 
upon the war, into which the United States had entered 
only shortly before this Quarterly Convocation. How 
much has happened since ! 

The Companions did not fail to enjoy themselves 
at this Convocation. We read : — 

"Mr. Alonzo Peck was introduced, and entertained 
the Companions with an illustrated lecture on the 
"Storm Heroes of Our Coast," the United States Life 
Saving Service, after which the Companions repaired 
to the banquet-hall, where a sumptuous banquet was 
enjoyed." 

The third Quarterly Convocation in 1917 was held 
on the 11th September ; Comp. Prince again presided 
in the same hall. 

A memorial of Past Deputy Grand High Priest 
George C. Thacher, who died on the 8th August, 1917, 
at the age of 55, was read. 

But even a greater loss had been sustained by Grand 
Chapter since the last Quarterly Convocation : — 

"On the 22nd June, the news came to us of the 
sudden death, after a few days' illness, of our beloved 



lxii APPENDIX 

Grand Secretary, J. Gilman Waite. Not only the 
Capitular Rite, but the Fraternity in all its branches, 
has lost a faithful and valued friend and strong adherent 
of all of its best ideals. Connected with our Institu- 
tion as he has been for over 50 years, he was a tower of 
strength and fountain of knowledge to the Craft. A 
genial friend to young and old, a loving husband to the 
wife who lives to mourn his loss. A host of friends will 
miss the genial smile and hearty handclasp of him who 
was so lovingly called 'Gil' Waite." 

A successor was elected and installed at this meeting 
— Past Grand High Priest Frederick T. Comee, already 
known to us as the writer of the Annual Report on 
Foreign Correspondence. 

"After the conclusion of business, the Companions 
were entertained by an interesting illustrated lecture 
on Japan and its People by Companion Fred. E. Marble, 
after which dinner was served in the banquet-hall." 

The Annual Convocation for 1917 (the 119th) was 
held in the same hall, on the 11th December. M.E.. 
Comp. Arthur D. Prince again presided, and we note 
that he was re-elected to the great office of Grand High 
Priest. 

The Committee on Returns reported a membership 
on the 31st August, 1917, of 26,385 ; net gain for the 
year, 767 ; number of Chapters, 83. 

The Grand Treasurer's Report showed a cash 
balance on hand of $6,545.15, after paying all expenses 
and purchasing $3,000 worth of Liberty bonds. And 
the Trustees' Report accounted for the large sum of 
$42,000 invested in good securities. 

Memorials of the following deceased Companions 
were read : Walter Frank Medding, Grand Scribe in 
1909, ob. Sept. 14th, 1917 ; George Maury Rice, Grand 
King in 1889, ob. Nov. 8th, 1917 ; Warren Preston 
Dudley, Deputy Grand High Priest in 1910, ob. June 
27th, 1917 ; Nathan B. Fletcher, Deputy Grand High 
Priest in 1879, ob. Nov. 8th, 1917. 

The address of the Grand High Priest was able and 
thoughtful. It began as follows : — 

"Abraham Lincoln once said that this country could 
not continue ' half slave and half free.' To-day, we may 



APPENDIX lxiii 

be permitted to paraphrase that remark and proclaim 
that the world cannot continue half militaristic and 
half otherwise ; and, while we meet here in the peaceful 
quiet of our Annual Convocation, the world is seething 
in the struggle which is to decide that question for all 
time. 

"We find ourselves to-day intensely occupied, not 
only in our ordinary vocations, but bending every effort 
to accomplish the victory for humanity which our 
country, together with the other great democracies of 
the world, has set out to win. 

"With these more important questions facing us, it 
might seem puerile to lay too much stress upon the 
details of our Capitular year, but the whole Institution 
of Freemasonry is doing and will continue to do its 
share in this great war ; and, therefore, it is well that 
we continue our interest and activity in the institution 
that binds our members into one common bond and 
society for the furtherance of good, generous, and 
patriotic deeds. I therefore place before you the record 
of the Grand Chapter for the past year." 

The record was one of harmony and progress. 

Comp. Comee, the learned and able reviewer, 
presents his 6th Report on Foreign Correspondence. 
His main purpose, he tells us, is to call attention to 
"customs and laws of other Jurisdictions differing from 
our own." He has no intention of criticising — he deals 
with printed facts. Reviewing 48 books of proceedings, 
he misses Canada, which we regret. Alberta, Nova 
Scotia, and Quebec are there. In his "Conclusion" 
he discusses "subjects." Like an old friend of ours, 
he has "no small talk!" Some of his subjects are : 
"The Proper Title for a Correspondence Report," 
about which there has been a good deal of discussion ; 
"Reinstallation ;" "Smoking." 

Arthur D. Prince, 108 Merrimack Street, Lowell, 
Grand High Priest. 

Frederick T. Comee, Masonic Temple, Boston, 
Grand Secretary. 



lxiv APPENDIX 

Michigan. 

We experienced the usual pleasure in turning over 
the leaves of the good literature supplied by the Michi- 
gan Grand Chapter. The Grand High Priest who 
presided at the Convocation of 1918 — held in Detroit 
on the 21st and 22nd May, 1918 — is an able and vigor- 
ous gentleman, a lawyer by profession, practising in the 
town of Durand. Elmer Sylvester Atherton was born 
on a Michigan farm, in September, 1870. These facts 
we learn from a biographical sketch which accompanies 
his portrait ; and these words are added : — 

"At Detroit he began and at Detroit he finished his 
official career for the Grand Chapter. His year has 
been one of the most successful in its history, and with 
one exception it had the largest gain in membership. 
Small and weak Chapters have been visited, inspected, 
and encouraged to push forward and become live 
Chapters. A system of ' visitation ' by Grand Officers 
was instituted which has been of great benefit. Being 
yet young in years, it is hoped he may devote his talents 
to the good of Capitular Masonry for many years to 
come." 

The financial statement was an excellent one. The 
Grand Chapter had an invested fund of $10,000, to 
which they added $5,000 in Liberty bonds out of a 
large surplus from the receipts of the year. There is 
also an emergency and benevolent fund with a good 
sum to its credit. There are 155 subordinate Chapters; 
total membership at the end of 1917, 26,841 ; net gain 
in a year, 1,150 — the largest save one in the history of 
the Grand Chapter. 

Horace Sheldon Maynard, who was Grand High 
Priest in 1903, and was Grand Lecturer from 1907 
until his death, "passed out of this life at his home in 
Charlotte," on the 22nd September, 1918. He was 
born in 1849. "A strong personality," said the Grand 
High Priest, "his life was filled with benedictions and 
kind deeds. He possessed the rare ability to teach 
without tiring and criticise without cutting. His un- 
selfish devotion to his labours of love broke down a 
strong constitution and a brilliant mind." He was 
a lawyer and had served several terms as a Judge. 



APPENDIX lxv 

Of William Frederick Denfeld, Grand High Priest 
in 1901, who died at his home in Saginaw on the 4th 
October, 1917, it was said that he had taken a very 
active part in the upbuilding of the educational in- 
stitutions of Saginaw. He was by profession a lawyer. 

A third Past Grand High Priest died during the 
official year — Reuben Charles Webb, who presided 
over the Grand Chapter in 1900. He died at his home 
in Detroit, in March, 1918. He was born in England, 
in 1843 ; he had been a farmer and a railroad man ; 
he fought in the Civil War ; and was distinguished in 
several branches of Masonry. 

The Grand High Priest and other Grand Officers 
did the work of visiting and instructing after the death 
of Comp. Maynard until the end of the year ; but at 
this Convocation John G. Kingsley, of Manchester, 
P.G.H.P., was elected Grand Lecturer. The office is 
an important one in the Michigan Grand Chapter. 

The address of Grand High Priest Atherton, while 
most interesting to read, and full of good sense and 
good feeling, hardly lends itself to quotation. 

The Grand Secretary, the celebrated Charles A. 
Conover, is the writer of the "Annual Review of 
Capitular Masonry from the Printed Prodeedings of 
other Jurisdictions." To use his own picturesque 
language, he takes his "16th whirl at reviewing," and 
begins as usual with his "Scrap Book," 4th ed. " Demit 
or Dimit ?" Which is right ? That is one of the 
subjects discussed. The answer appears to be "De- 
mit." 

There are reviews of the doings of 55 Grand Chapters 
— very able of course, and very thorough. Canada 
(1917) receives much attention. 

Walter J. Booth, Widdicomb Building, Grand 
Rapids, Grand High Priest. 

Charles A. Conover, Coldwater, Grand Secretary. 

Mississippi. 

There are 67 Chapters on the roll of the Grand 
Chapter (1918) ; total membership, 4,286 ; net gain 
in a year, 89. There was a slight loss in the previous 
year, which is now more than made up. 



lxvi APPENDIX 

The Grand Treasurer's Report showed a balance of 
$7,246.39 on hand. 

The Grand Chapter held its 70th Annual Convoca- 
tion in the City of Natchez, on the 21st February, 1918. 
William Harrison Carter, Grand High Priest, presided, 
and in his annual address referred (of course) to the war. 
"During the first part of the year," he said, "when 
many of our Master Masons were preparing to enter 
the army service, many of the Chapters were very 
active, but in the latter part of the year this activity 
to a large extent ceased. Everywhere men are thinking 
of other things, and the affairs of the Chapter have not 
had the attention they might otherwise have had. So 
far as I know, harmony and good fellowship prevail 
throughout this Jurisdiction and throughout the 
Capitular World." 

Among the notable fraternal dead of the year was 
M.E. Comp. John Silas Brooks, Grand High Priest of 
this Grand Chapter in 1908, who departed this life, 
on the 17th March, 1917. 

Of the Masonic Home, the Grand High Priest 
remarked : — 

"It has been my good fortune to visit the Home 
several times during the year. I sincerely wish that 
every Companion could visit our Home and observe 
the splendid work we are doing there. It is not merely 
an orphan asylum or eleemosynary institution, but 
a real home with the right kind of a home-spirit, where 
home-attention and home-training are being given, 
and where our boys and girls are being prepared for a 
useful life in a better way than in many a private home. 

"Royal Arch Masonry has taken upon itself the 
obligation of providing dormitory quarters for the 
boys of the Home. The splendid and well-equipped 
building we have provided there has been adequate, 
so far, to do our part of the work. It will, however, 
not be long before we shall have to increase its capacity 
to provide for the constantly increasing numbers, 
Our building is so arranged that we can add to it without 
excessive cost. The next addition, which must be put 
up in the next two or three years, will cost approximate- 
ly $8,000. We can easily provide $1,000 a year for 






APPENDIX lxvii 

this purpose, and by the time it is necessary to build 
the addition we shall have sufficient margin to go ahead. 
Then, before another increase of numbers makes 
necessary further additions, we shall have this one paid 
for." 

In pursuance of this suggestion $1,000 was appro- 
priated by Grand Chapter for the purpose stated. 

The Report of the Grand Lecturer, W. H. Whitaker, 
is, as usual, very interesting. We note that he has 
retired from that office. William Harrison Carter, 
Immediate Past Grand High Priest, is now Grand 
Lecturer. 

At this Convocation, Jere H. Power was elected and 
installed Grand High Priest. In accordance with an 
excellent custom, his portrait is in the forefront of the 
volume for 1918, and in a few lines some account of 
his life is given. He was born is 1865, and is a machin- 
ist ; he has three sons enlisted in the army ; he is a 
Deacon in the Baptist Church ; and lives in Mathiston. 

It will be noticed that this Grand Chapter meets 
in February, as does ours. A curious situation arises 
out of this synchrony. In 1917, in writing of Mississip- 
pi (1916), we quoted a paragraph from the Report of 
Grand Lecturer Whitaker — without comment. Then 
in J.918, our brother scribe, Oliver Lee McKay of 
Mississippi, refers to our 1917 report, in these words : 
"Numerous extracts from Companion Cullens' report 
appear, as well as fullsome reference to Grand Lecturer 
Whitaker 's report." "Fullsome" is what the printer 
has made Comp. McKay say. It should be of course 
"some reference." There was nothing fulsome. No 
doubt Comp. McKay will apologise for his printer, 
but that will be in 1920. We are now writing in 1919. 
It will be seen that to deal thoroughly with this little 
bungle we have to travel through the reports of 5 years 
—1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, and 1920. This is an illus- 
tration of what many correspondents, who, like Ezra 
and Nehemiah, are writing at each other, are continually 
doing. But, as Joe Gargery says, "From myself far 
be it." 

The aforesaid Oliver Lee McKay stands in no need 
of praise — but, if we were presumptuous enough to 



lxviii APPENDIX 

speak our mind, we should be safe in saying that his is 
one of the best of the reviews which have reached us — 
we mean, of course, his review dated the 1st January, 
1918, his 9th Annual Report on Fraternal Correspon- 
dence. The proceedings of 53 Grand Chapters are 
delightfully dealt with. Leaving "fullsome" out of 
account he has done Canada (1917) full justice. 

Jere H. Power, Mathiston, Grand High Priest. 

Frederick Gordon Speed, Vicksburg, Grand Secre- 
tary. 

Nebraska. 

One of the features of the Nebraska Grand Chapter 
is interest in Masonic Homes — not only its own Homes, 
but the Homes established in other States. Thus we 
have in the volume of proceedings for 1917 a list of 
Masonic Homes — all but one, Nova Scotia, being in 
the United States — with carefully tabulated particulars 
as to accommodation, cost of upkeep, endowments, 
assessments, etc. This is excellent. The 'Nebraska 
Homes are for aged men and women and for children ; 
they were opened in 1913. 

At the 51st Annual Convocation of the Grand 
Chapter of Nebraska, held at Omaha, on the 12th and 
13th December, 1917, the presiding Grand High Priest, 
Carroll D. Evans, devoted a large portion of his address 
to the Nebraska Homes, explaining their problems, 
and stating that the management was exceptionally 
good. "Eight adults," he said, "have been admitted 
so far this year to the Home, and 8 children have been 
admitted to the Homes for children, 5 of them being 
at the cottage on the Home grounds at Plattsmouth. 
Nine adults "were called to rest during the year, and 
5 children and 4 old people left. There are now at the 
different Homes 17 men, 17 women, 15 boys, and 11 
girls, a total of 60 ; and, in addition, about 35 brethren, 
their widows or orphans, are being assisted at their 
own homes by the Grand Lodge Committee on Relief." 
There is much more about the Homes, but this will 
give some idea of what is being done. 

The Grand High Priest requested the Grand Chapter 
to consider the question whether the Correspondence 
Reports should be continued. There is no record of 






APPENDIX lxix 

any discussion, but it was formally resolved "that 
until further action by the Grand Chapter no reports 
on correspondence be published." At this Convo- 
cation there was, however, a short report by Past 
Grand High Priest Frank E. Bullard (who appears to 
have returned to Nebraska). He did not deal with 
the proceedings of each Grand Chapter in turn, in the 
time-honoured way, but stated that he had read the 
proceedings of a large number of Grand Chapters 
(Canada included) and found little in them that was 
out of the ordinary. After discussing a few matters 
of interest, he concludes a very readable report of less 
than 4 pages by regretting the loss of personal touch 
with "the genial gentlemen who write these reports 
for other Grand Jurisdictions." 

The deaths of two important members of the Grand 
Chapter of Nebraska were feelingly announced by the 
Committee on Fraternal Dead. Charles M. Kaley, 
who was Grand High Priest in 1908, was born in 1846, 
and died on the 6th January, 1917. John Kelley, 
born in 1860, was Grand Captain of the Host at the 
time of his death, the 9th December, 1917. 

The remarks of the Grand High Priest upon the 
events of the day, under the heading "Philosophy of 
Inhumanity," are well worthy of perusal, but condensa- 
tion would spoil them, and they are too long to quote. 

The financial statement was an encouraging one. 
There was a good surplus even after an investment of 
$5,000 in Liberty bonds and a purchase of $1,500 worth 
of shares of the stock of the Nebraska Masonic Home. 

There are 53 subordinate Chapters ; total member- 
ship, 5,504 ; net gain in a year, 264. 

John R. Stine, Omaha, Grand High Priest. 

Francis E. White, Omaha, Grand Secretary. 

New Brunswick. 

The tale is rather a sad one, and is soon told. We 
have before us two volumes of proceedings — 1917 and 
1918. 

The 30th Annual Convocation of the Grand Royal 
Arch Chapter of New Brunswick was held in Free- 
masons Hall in the City of St. John, on the 25th 



lxx APPENDIX 

April, 1917. There were 9 actual or acting Grand 
Officers present and 15 other members of Grand 
Chapter. M.E. Comp. Le Baron Wilson, Grand High 
Priest, presided. In his address, after an allusion to 
the war, he referred to the lamented death of M.E. 
Comp. Andrew McNichol, who was Grand High Priest 
in 1907. 

The Grand High Priest reported that during his 
year of office he had visited all the subordinate Chapters 
but 2. He said that the work was well done in all the 
Chapters visited, and that harmony prevailed every- 
where. 

There are 8 subordinate Chapters ; the total 
membership on the 31st December, 1816, was 880 ; 
net loss in a year, 39. There were 21 exaltations and 
2 affiliations ; but 12 withdrew, 32 were suspended, 
and 13 died. 

The Grand Treasurer's account showed a cash 
balance of $886.91, being about $100 less than at the 
end of the previous year. There is an invested fund 
of $1,000. 

A resolution recommending a change in the time of 
meeting was unanimously approved — the Annual Con- 
vocation to be held on the afternoon and evening of the 
day preceding that fixed for the Annual Communica- 
tion of the Grand Lodge of New Brunswick. It did 
not, however, become law at this Convocation. 

Jasper J. Daly was elected and installed Grand 
High Priest for the ensuing year; and it was he who 
presided at the 31st Annual Convocation, held at the 
same place on the 24th April, 1918. 

There were again 9 actual or acting Grand Officers 
in attendance ; and there were 17 other members of 
Grand Chapter. 

There is nothing which calls for remark in the 
address of the Grand High Priest. 

. The Grand Secretary reported a total membership 
on the 31st December, 1917, of 862 — a decrease of 18. 
The number of Chapters is the same, but one made no 
returns.. 

The Grand Treasurer reported, an investment of 
$500 in Canada War bonds, and brought forward a 
cash balance of $541.18. 



APPENDIX lxxi 

An amendment to the Constitution was proposed 
and adopted to carry out the change decided upon as 
to the time of holding the Annual Convocation. 

There is no Correspondence Report. 

Horace A. Porter, St. John, Grand High Priest. 

J. Twining Hartt, Ritchie's Building, St. John, 
Grand Secretary. 

New Hampshire. 

We noted in our review published in 1918, that 
Ephraim Frank Boomer, of Dover, had been elected 
Grand High Priest at the Convocation of May, 1917. 
He was duly installed and assumed the duties of his 
high office, but, as we now learn, in September, 1917, 
he became seriously ill, and died on the 30th October, 
1917, after a painful illness. He was born in 1869. 
He was engaged in a successful lumber business in 
Dover up to the time of his illness. He is described 
as being able, genial, and very popular. His portrait 
is at the beginning of the volume of the proceedings 
of 1918. 

This was the 99th Convocation of the Grand 
Chapter of New Hampshire, held in Freemasons Hall, 
in the City of Concord, on the 14th May. Albert 
Rand Junkins, Deputy Grand High Priest, presided; 
and, as he had acted as head of the Grand Chapter 
since September, 1917, gave a full account of his ad- 
ministration. He began with a feeling reference to the 
death of Comp. Boomer, and went on to speak of 
Josiah Lafayette Seward, who was Foreign Corres- 
pondent from 1906 to 1917, and whose death we 
noticed a year ago. Seward was a Unitarian Minister, 
and was, to quote the presiding officer, "a remarkable 
man in many ways, being gifted with unusual mental 
powers, a very ready and interesting extemporaneous 
speaker, as well as one whose addresses, sermons, and 
essays were carefully and logically prepared." 

In reference to the Masonic Home, the acting 
Grand High Priest said : — 

"I feel that I should not be doing my duty to the 
Masonic fraternity if I did not mention the Masonic 
Home at Manchester. The Home is doing a good 



lxxii APPENDIX 

work. More could be done if the building was larger, 
so that more of our aged and dependent Brothers could 
be cared for. Let us not forget this noble institution 
in our charities, and may those of us who can, try to 
remember it in our wills, so that it may be able to con- 
tinue in the providing of a home for our less fortunate 
Companions." 

Attention was directed to the fact that the Grand 
Chapter would be 100 years old in June, 1919. 

The subordinate Chapters were inspected by the 
Principal Officers, the work being divided among them. 
Their reports show a satisfactory condition. 

There are 26 Chapters on the roll ; total member- 
ship in 1918, 4,629 ; net gain in a year, 31. 

The Financial Report showed a balance of $2,829.23 
on hand. 

Albert Rand Junkins was elected and installed as 
Grand High Priest for 1918-1919. 

The Committee on Doings of Grand Officers recom- 
mended that the first four Grand Officers and the 
Grand Secretary be a Committee with full powers to 
arrange for a proper celebration of the 100th Anniver- 
sary of this Grand Chapter. The recommendation 
was adopted. 

M.E. Comp. Charles B. Spofford, Past Grand High 
Priest, a valuable recruit in the Correspondence Corps, 
presents his first report, covering the proceedings of 
54 Grand Bodies. 

We quote from his opening remarks this well- 
framed paragraph : — 

"The task of reading all these reports has been one 
of interest. To cull from each that which has seemed 
to me of value to the Companions of our own Grand 
Chapter has, perhaps, been the hardest part of the 
work, because different minds take to their compre- 
hension a different angle of perspective. The lights 
and shadows of the great conflict have entered largely 
into the various addresses of the Grand High Priests, 
and memorials have added a touch of sympathy to most 
of them. So much as we have done, we most respect- 
fully offer, in an attempt to fulfil the requirements of 
our illustrious predecessor, Josiah L. Seward, whose 






APPENDIX lxxiii 

attainments had placed him on such a pinnacle that 
his proficiency seems quite unattainable." 

There is a thoughtful and interesting review of this 
Grand Chapter's proceedings in 1917. 

Albert Rand Junkins, Portsmouth, Grand High 
Priest. 

Harry Morrison Cheney, Concord, Grand Secretary. 

New Jersey. 

This Grand Chapter is not one of the largest. It 
does not enter for the Capitular Marathon. Indeed 
there are only 43 subordinate Chapters in the Juris- 
diction, and the membership on the 31st December, 
1917, was only 8,877 (net gain in a year, 506) ; but it 
is not numbers that make a Grand Chapter really 
grand. Nor is it riches. The New Jersey Grand 
Chapter budget is a modest one ; but there was a 
substantial surplus, of which $1,000 was handed over 
to the Grand Trustees for investment — and the in- 
vestments are all in Liberty bonds. Also $100 was 
given to the Second War Fund of the American Red 
Cross. 

At the 62nd Annual Convocation, held in the City 
of Trenton, on the 15th May, 1918, M.E. Comp. 
William Herbert Lowe, Grand High Priest, presided. 
We have no biographical sketch, but his address speaks 
eloquently of his personality. We should like to give 
the whole of it, but these passages must suffice : — 

"The great war, deplorable and horrible as it is, 
will, I trust, make better Masons and citizens of us — 
will, I trust, elevate our ideals, intensify our devotion 
to them, and inspire us with a desire to render an ever- 
enlarging service to humanity. 

"The support of the Red Cross work, contributions 
made for the War Relief Fund, the purchase of Liberty 
bonds, and the conservation of food and fuel, in all of 
which activities the Royal Craft have taken such a 
prominent part, are worthy of the highest commenda 
tion. As Freemasons we realise that flag-waving, shout- 
ing, and enthusiasm are not the full measure of our 
patriotic obligation. Our part as Royal Arch Masons 



lxxiv APPENDIX 

is to stand solidly behind our soldiers, matching their 
sacrifice with our sacrifice ; and it is almost marvellous 
to behold the demonstration of this sentiment in the 
worthy deeds of greater magnitude than bygone ages 
have ever witnessed or known. 

"The statistical table submitted to me by our 
Grand Secretary, April 18th, 1918, shows that the 
past year has been a very successful one for our Grand 
Chapter, from both the standpoint of membership 
and that of finance ; this is particularly gratifying 
considering war conditions. We are not, however, 
going to measure our success by a substantial net 
increase in membership or even by an increased re- 
venue received this year, but rather by the good work 
done through our time-honoured institution for the 
betterment of humanity and the promulgation of the 
old Masonic teaching concerning the Fatherhood of 
God and the Brotherhood of Man, which some nations 
in these latter times, in their mad rush for earthly 
power and supremacy, seem to have forgotten or set 
at naught." 

It is the translating into action of such principles 
as these that makes a Grand Chapter grand indeed. 

The reception of distinguished visitors is a feature 
at all Grand Chapter Convocations in New Jersey. 

At this Convocation there were present, among 
others, the Grand High Priests of the Grand Chapters 
of Pennsylvania, New York, and Delaware, and two 
representatives from our own Grand Chapter — M.E. 
Comp. D. F. MacWatt, P.G.Z., and R.E. Comp. W. 
N. Ponton, G.H. The speech of our own Comp. 
MacWatt, in answer to his enthusiastic reception, is 
given in full in the book of proceedings before us, and 
it is one of which he and we may well be proud. By 
a coincidence it was 49 years to a day since he first 
saw the shore of New Jersey, coming as a lad from 
Scotland on the 15th May, 1869. Comp. Ponton 
spoke briefly, but with his usual fervour. 

Among the notable dead in New Jersey, Joseph Ely 
Fulper, who was Grand High Priest in 1895, stands 
first. He was born in 1841, in New Jersey, and spent 



APPENDIX lxxv 

most of his useful and honourable life in Washington, 
New Jersey. He was in the first rank of those who 
worked for the betterment of his city's public services. 
In Masonic circles he was a prominent and forceful 
figure. 

The Grand High Priest reported upon the work 
of re-districting the State and the appointment of 
District Deputy Grand High Priests in lieu of Assistant 
Lecturers. On the whole, the new plan had been suc- 
cessful. The District Deputies met and were instructed 
by the Grand Lecturer and the Ritual Committee ; 
Schools of Instruction were held ; and the Grand High 
Priest said that the proficiency exhibited in the rendi- 
tion of the several degrees was "an unmistakable 
evidence of interest and devotion on the part of 
Officers and Companions of the Chapters, which must 
be highly gratifying to our Grand Instructor, to the 
Ritual Committee, and to the respective District 
Deputies, all of whom labour earnestly and unceasingly 
for the maintenance of the standard work and its 
intelligent and impressive rendition." 

The "Report of Foreign Correspondence" is again 
the work of M.E. Comp. Henry S. Haines, who is also 
Grand Lecturer, and evidently a great factor in the 
Masonic life of New Jersey. He has "so quiet and so 
sweet a style" that we always rise from a perusal of 
his review with a feeling of uplift. In his survey of 
the workings of 49 Grand Bodies, he does not forget 
Canada (1918), and indeed has much to say of our 
Grand Chapter. A recent interchange of visits has 
drawn the two Grand Chapters closely together. And 
we are proud to say that this veteran reviewer, while 
not agreeing with us as to the lawfulness or even ex- 
pediency of the use of a substitute or "dummy" 
candidate in the conferring of the Royal Arch degree, 
has some kind words of commendation for our humble 
efforts.. 

Andrew N. MacKinnon, Newark, Grand High 
Priest. 

Peter McGill, Bound Brook, Grand Secretary. 



lxxvi APPENDIX 

New Mexico. 

Alexander D. Goldenberg, Grand High Priest (1916- 
17), welcomed the delegates to the 20th Annual Con- 
vocation of the Grand Chapter of New Mexico, held 
in the City of Las Cruces, on the 11th October, 1917. 
There is little in his address which can be regarded as 
of general interest. He referred briefly to the death, 
on the 14th January, 1917, of M.E. Comp. John C. 
Slack, who was Grand High Priest in 1910-11 ; and to 
other Companions of less note who had also been 
laid to rest during the year. 

One subject touched on in the address may be here 
referred to. The Grand High Priest divided the State 
into four districts and assigned one to each of the four 
principal officers of the Grand Chapter "for visitation 
purposes." This was in accordance with a resolution 
passed in 1915, by which District Deputy Grand High 
Priests were done away with. The new plan did not 
work well, the Grand High Priest said. He had failed 
to get a report from any of his three associate Grand 
Officers of their visits. He gave some account of his 
own visits, but it is not made clear whether he visited 
all the Chapters in the fourth district, that which he 
reserved for himself. He recommended Grand Chapter 
to go back to the old system of District Deputies. 
The Committee on the address did not agree — they 
thought the system inaugurated in 1915 should at least 
have a longer trial, and recommended its continuance. 
The report is signed by six Past Grand High Priests. 
But Grand Chapter backed up the Grand High Priest 
and restored the District Deputies, who are to be 
appointed by the Grand High Priest — the new Grand 
High Priest being one of the three who did not report 
under the intermediate system. We look with interest 
to next year's report. 

This Grand Chapter is fairly prosperous. There 
are 18 subordinate Chapters (but one is inactive) ; 
there was a total membership on the 31st August, 1917, 
of 1,217 ; and there was a net gain in the year of 46. 
The Masonic Home Fund had swelled to $3,761.31 ; 
and the Grand Treasurer had a cash balance on hand 
of $890.78. 



APPENDIX lxxvii 

R.E. Comp. James H. Wroth, of Albuquerque, is 
again in the reviewer's easy chair, and polishes off 46 
Grand Chapters in fine style. The Canada report 
which comes in for notice is an old one — 1917 — but 
it was the latest available at the time when the review 
was written, and Comp. Wroth's comments upon it 
are all favourable. We reserve our opinion upon his 
dictum that a Grand Chapter is both a legislature and 
a court of law. We like his remark^ on Masonic 
Homes, in his "Conclusion," and quote them in full : — 

" There has been such uniformity of work and law 
that a reviewer has but little to criticise and nothing 
to condemn. In both Lodges and Chapters (Grand 
Bodies) there is rapidly crystallising the question of 
Homes — and how to attain them. Personally I don't 
like the method generally adopted. It is a form of 
charity which reminds me of the old-fashioned 'poor 
farm,' and especially when names of inmates and cost 
are exploited in the proceedings. If we must, and 
certainly should, give "help, aid, and assistance" to 
worthy members, I prefer the Iowa and New Mexico 
plan — do it quietly, plentifully, and say nothing about 
it. Some people are forced to accept help, by adver- 
sity, but they do not care to have it announced to a 
gossipy world in large print. ' Charity vaunteth not 
itself.'" 

The whole review is excellent reading. 

Herbert B. Holt, Las Cruces, Grand High Priest. 

Alpheus A. Keen, Albuquerque, Grand Secretary. 

New York. 

The 121st Annual Convocation of the Grand Chap- 
ter of Royal Arch Masons of the State of New York 
was held in the Masonic Temple in the City of Albany, 
on the 5th and 6th of February, 1918. 

A large number of members were in attendance, 
and there were also many distinguished visitors, who 
were formally introduced and welcomed by the presiding 
Grand High Priest, M.E. Comp. C. Wesley Orr ; 
many of them made eloquent responses, which were 
taken down by stenographers and transcribed in the 



lxxviii APPENDIX 

proceedings. The Grand High Priests of New Jersey, 
Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania were some of those 
who were thus honoured. And our own Grand Second 
Principal, R.E. Comp. William Nisbet Ponton, who, 
being stormbound, did not reach Albany till late on 
the opening day, had a special reception on the second 
day, and delivered an address, in an exalted strain, 
at the conclusion of which he "was greeted with pro- 
longed applause, the Companions all standing." 

The address read by the Grand High Priest of New 
York was a statesmanlike document, dealing exhaus- 
tively with the past, present, and future of the Grand 
Chapter and its affairs, and with all branches of its 
work. He made. visits to 40 of the subordinate Chap- 
ters, and, in fact, did so much in visiting, counselling, 
ruling, and in many other ways, that we cannot help 
wondering if he had time to do anything else. He 
gives his conclusion : 

"When I accepted this office, one year ago, I said 
that I considered this the supreme executive body of 
Ancient Craft Masonry in the Jurisdiction, whose 
history breathes brotherhood and harmony from every 
page. To-day, with greater knowledge of the worthi- 
ness of the men who are giving this Institution their 
best effort, gleaned from a closer, more intimate associ- 
ation with them than before, a broader concept of 
the work Royal Arch Masonry has done, and is doing, 
and with a vision of what an ever-increasing influence 
for good it will have as the years advance, I realise 
that the privilege of serving this Grand Chapter is an 
honour second to none in Masonry. As such, Com- 
panions, I prize it ; and that this vision of the future 
may be realised, that practical effort to that end may 
not be delayed, we shall now turn to the work of the 
Convocation." 

The Grand Treasurer's report deals with large 
figures. The cash received from interest on deposits 
alone amounted to nearly $6,000 ; and the dues col- 
lected by the Grand Secretary amounted to more than 
$22,000, while the total disbursements were less than 
$21,000. A large surplus, amounting now to nearly 
$150,000 is invested. 



APPENDIX lxxix 

The Grand Secretary reported that returns had 
been received from all of the 212 chartered Chapters, 
and all had paid their dues. The membership on the 
27th December, 1917, was 43,526 ; net increase in 
1917, 1,449. It was remarked by the Grand Secretary 
that, after a period of comparatiye depression covering 
a decade, there had been a decided revival of activity 
and numerical growth — a larger net increase was re- 
ported than in any year since 1907. 

The Committee on the address of the Grand High 
Priest in their report said : — 

"It is the unanimous opinion of your Committee 
that the address is one of unusual excellence and merit. 
Other addresses on similar occasions may have been 
more eloquent, contained more striking phrases, or 
more poetical quotations, but no other address shows 
evidence of deeper love for Royal Arch Masonry or 
greater desire for the advancement of the Royal Craft." 

The Deputy Grand High Priest, R.E. Comp. J. 
William Prouse, of Buffalo, an enthusiastic Mason, 
well-known in Canada, was unanimously elected Grand 
High Priest for the ensuing year, and duly installed. 

R.E. Comp. Pierre Cushing, Grand Chaplain, de- 
livered an eloquent address on the timely and inspiring 
theme, "Masonic Loyalty ; the Reason Why." This 
is printed in full in an appendix to the proceedings. 

The Report of the Committee on Foreign Corres- 
pondence, by M.E. Comp. Marvin I. Greenwood, his 
14t/h Annual Review, attains his usual standard of 
excellence. We are grateful for some words which he 
wrote, when giving a very full review of the 1917 pro- 
ceedings of our Grand Chapter. Noticing our modest 
contribution, he said : "We pass his work on to the 
Craft as good work, square work, and well prepared." 

All that he wrote has significance from what has 
since occurred, which is best described by the Grand 
Secretary in a postscript to the Report : — 

"The saddest duty that has been imposed on me 
in many a day is this of appending a few lines to the 
finished work of our beloved friend and Companion, 
Marvin I. Greenwood. 



lxxx APPENDIX 

"Companion Greenwood had just completed his 
14th Annual Report on Foreign Correspondence, and 
only a few pages remained to be typed, when he was 
stricken with his last illness, an abscess of the larynx, 
and in a few short days, on the 27th December, 1917, 
his soul passed through the Celestial Veils and entered 
the presence of the Supreme High Priest. Those of 
us who knew his daily life, his upright walk, his sublime 
faith, cannot doubt but that he received the assurance, 
'Well done, thou good and faithful servant ; enter 
thou into the joy of thy Lord.' 

"Companion Greenwood loved this work, he loved 
its associations and the kindly companionship of those 
congenial spirits who gathered about the ' round table ' 
of the Correspondents' Guild. He surveyed the broad 
field of Masonry with the serene vision of the philoso- 
pher. He found a perennial interest in the kaleido- 
scopic activities revealed in the volumes that came 
to his table from the Grand Chapters of the world. 
These activities he reported faithfully and intelli- 
gently, but indulged sparingly in polemics. He would 
not compromise with wrong, yet he was tolerant and 
charitable in his comment, and his pen never inflicted 
a wound nor left a sting. 

"Companion Greenwood maintained the high tra~ 
ditions of scholarship and vigour which have been 
associated with the Chairmanship of this Committee 
in this Grand Chapter of New York. It is a coinci- 
dence that his immediate predecessor, George J. Gard- 
ner, laid down his pen forever when in the midst of 
his 14th Annual Report. Companion Gardner was 
a zealous and skilful workman, strong in controversy 
and diligent in research, and his work was widely 
appreciated. Before Companion Gardner's time, from 
1872 to 1890, these reports were prepared by that 
eminent Masonic scholar and graceful writer, Darius 
A. Ogden. He was the leader of the ' Guild' in his day. 

"The first report to the Grand Chapter by a Com- 
mittee on Foreign Correspondence was rendered in 
1827 by Companion Munson Smith, and was em- 
braced in five lines, in which the Committee 'viewed 
with pleasure the flourishing condition of the sublime 



APPENDIX lxxxi 

science,' and found 'nothing contained in the several 
proceedings requiring the particular attention of this 
Grand Chapter.' In 1847 a Select Committee on 
Foreign Correspondence was appointed, and in 1849 
the first report embracing a real review was submitted 
by Companion Lewis G. Hoffman. From that time 
the work was carried forward and gradually developed 
by Companions Hoffman and Joseph White. Those 
distinguished jurists John L. Lewis and Finlay M. 
King served as Chairmen in the 'fifties,' and gave 
liberally of their time and talent to the service of the 
Companions. 

"Now Companion Greenwood has joined that 
splendid galaxy in the spirit-world, but the memory 
of his strong personality, his kindly deeds and friendly 
words, is still fresh and vital in its influence. If the 
reader will turn to the review of California in this 
Report, he will find that Companion Greenwood, in 
writing of William A. Davies, unconsciously indited 
his own epitaph when he said : — 

'The influence of such a life can never end, but 
will grow and extend through all the endless years of 
eternity.' " 

We note that the Grand High Priest appointed 
as the Standing Committee on Foreign Correspond- 
ence for the ensuing year : George A. Newell, of Medina ; 
Esbon B. Rew, of Buffalo ; and Smith F. Pearsall, of 
Freeport. 

Throughout the proceedings there are many refer- 
ences to the death of Comp. Greenwood and the loss 
sustained by the Grand Chapter. He was in truth a 
man of high ideals and rare attainments. 

J. William Prouse, Masonic Temple, Buffalo, Grand 
High Priest. 

Charles C. Hunt, Masonic Hall, New York, Grand 
Secretary. 

New Zealand. 

We have before us the "Journal of Proceedings of 
January, 4918." The 26th Annual Convocation of 
the Supreme Grand Royal Arch Chapter of New Zea- 
land was held in the Masonic Hall, Nelson, on the 



lxxxii APPENDIX 

31st January, 1918. M.E. Comp. M. J. Harris, Grand 
Z., presided. 

The Grand Treasurer, V. E. Comp. A. Veitch, 
presented his Report, which showed a cash balance 
on hand of £273 3s. lOd. 

The Supreme Committee presented a Report upon 
the condition of Capitular Masonry in the Jurisdiction. 
There appear to be 8 districts with from 2 to 6 Chapters 
in each — 36 Chapters in all ; membership, 1,612 — the 
same as last year. 

Grand Chapter resolved, in order to save expense, 
not to hold the Annual Convocation in 1919. A motion 
"that the regular meeting of Supreme Grand Chapter 
be held triennially" was carried by a small majority, 
after a good deal of discussion. 

R. E. Comp. J. H. Harkness was elected First 
Grand Principal, and was duly invested, enthroned, 
and proclaimed. 

He then addressed Grand Chapter ; his chief theme 
was the war. 

The volume of proceedings is a small one ; there 
is no Correspondence Report, but the Roll of Honour, 
Pro P atria, is a long one. Every Chapter has repre- 
sentatives in the field, and some of them have many. 

J. H. Harkness, Westport, Grand High Priest. 

H. J. Williams, Wellington, Grand Secretary. 

North Dakota. 

Emil Louis Mackenroth, North Dakota's Grand 
High Priest for 1917-18, was born in Minnesota in 
1874 ; as reviewers reckon, he is a young man ; and 
in the face depicted in his portrait, prefacing the volume 
of proceedings for 1918, shrewdness, breadth, and 
humour are revealed. As a youth he entered the rail- 
way telegraph service, and became an expert in this 
highly technical branch of railway work. For many 
years he has lived in Fargo, but has recently been 
named superintendent ot telegraphs at Tacoma. During 
the last year or two, since the Government has been 
in control of the railways, he has given much time and 
attention to Government work — combining the various 



APPENDIX lxxxiii 

railway telegraphic systems for the public service. He 
is an enthusiastic Mason and an excellent ritualist. 
During his year of service, though barred from making 
the visits he had intended, because of prior claims of 
Uncle Sam upon his time, he did everything in his 
power to stimulate the activities of Chapters in war- 
work. Thus pleasantly discourses the Grand Secre- 
tary, in a brief biography of the ruling Grand Officer. 

The 29th Annual Convocation of the Grand Chapter 
of North Dakota was held in Fargo on the 20th June, 
1918. It may be remembered that at the Grand Con- 
vocation of 1917 it was decided to hold a two-days' 
session in 1918. Owing to changed conditions and 
demands for economy in time and money, it was 
resolved, in the forenoon of the first day, that there 
should be no second day. 

In his address Grand High Priest Mackenroth spoke 
of "the harmony and good feeling that exist among 
our constituent Chapters, as well as through all the 
Royal Craft wherever dispersed in the United States ; " 
but the printer made it disbursed — rather an amusing 
blunder. These accidents lighten the way of the 
reviewer. 

Death had not touched the Officers of the Grand 
Chapter nor the ranks of the Past Grand High Priests. 

Five hundred Masons had gone from North Dakota 
to serve their country, many of them prominently 
identified with Royal Arch Masonry. The leader of 
the North Dakota Infantry, now the 164th U.S. In- 
fantry, is Past Grand High Priest John H. Fraine. 

Under the heading "Investments" the Grand 
High Priest said : — 

"In accordance with the instructions of the Grand 
Chapter last year, we subscribed for $2,500 of the 
Second Liberty Loan bonds, which are now in the 
hands of the Grand Treasurer, and our subscription 
for $2,500 of the Third Liberty Loan was included in 
the splendid response which North Dakota made last 
April to the call for money. We find from the reports 
of 17 of the Chapters that $2,700 worth of Liberty 
bonds have been bought by Chapters — one Chapter, 
Carrington No. 15, taking $1,000. In addition to 



lxxxiv APPENDIX 

the above, we have invested $500 each in Red Cross 
and Army Y.M.C.A. We believe that the interest 
returned on these investments will be many times 
greater than that on Liberty bonds. It will not ap- 
pear on the books, but it will be entered in the lives 
of our boys at the front. Individual Chapters report 
contributions of $773.25 to various kinds of war- work. 
All this is good, but much more will have to be done." 

Reference was made to the Students' Loan Fund, 
established by Grand Chapter two years ago. In 
spite of the war, loans to students were still being made, 
but the demand was not so great as had been expected. 

The Grand Treasurer's Report showed a cash 
balance of $8,176.40, in addition to investments and 
moneys at the credit of special funds. 

There are 24 Chapters ; membership, 3,133 ; net 
gain in a year, 85. 

We find this interesting passage in the Report of the 
Grand Secretary : — 

"During the pastyear three well-known and greatly 
respected Grand Secretaries have laid down their pens 
forever : J. Gilman Waite, of Massachusetts ; Howard 
R. French, of Kentucky ; and Will H. Whyte, of Que- 
bec. Companion Waite was a sturdy son of New 
England and a tower of strength to Masonry in Massa- 
chusetts. He had long been Grand Secretary, and 
at the time of his death had passed the age of four 
score. Companion French was a typical southern 
gentleman of the old school. He had just passed his 
70th birthday when the summons came. He had long 
been identified with Masonry in Kentucky. Was 
chosen Grand Secretary of the Grand Chapter in 1912. 
Will H. Whyte, Grand Scribe E., had served the Ma- 
sonic bodies of his Province and the Templars of the 
Dominion for many years. His death was untimely, 
and the grief of his brethren in both Canada and the 
United States was unfeigned. He was, indeed, a 
gentleman and a Mason." 

M.E. Comp. E. George Guthrie presents his 4th 
Annual Review of the work of the Grand Chapters. 
He says it is a "very pleasant duty to wander among 
the fertile fields and gardens of Capitular Masonry." 



APPENDIX lxxxv 

He certainly spares no pains ; he has produced a read- 
able, instructive, and entertaining summary. We are 
naturally most interested in what he has to say of 
Canada (1918) ; and we find that he has judiciously 
picked out the salient facts in regard to our Grand 
Chapter, and has made little comment ; the facts speak 
for themselves. He adds to his report the excellent 
compilation of Grand Secretary Albert K. Wilson of 
the Grand Chapter of Missouri — a table showing the 
number of Royal Arch Masons to each 1,000 Master 
Masons, by States, with their relative rank. Another 
appendix to the Report is an article on "The York 
Rite" written by M.E. Comp. William F. Kuhn, also 
of Missouri. 

G. Roy Ringo, Minot, Grand High Priest. 

Walter L. Stockwell, Fargo, Grand Secretary. 

Nova Scotia. 

The printed proceedings of the Grand Chapter of 
Nova Scotia at its 48th Annual Convocation, held in 
Truro on the 12th June, 1917, have reached us ; but 
not the proceedings of June, 1918. We are thus dealing 
with ancient history ; and a part of the volume, viz., 
the Report of Foreign Correspondence, belongs to a 
still more remote period. No Correspondence Report 
was contained in the book for 1916, as we mentioned 
a year ago ; and we have now the Report which was 
prepared in that year. The explanation is given by 
M.E. Comp. S. J. Waddell, one of the Committee of 
three appointed to make the report for 1916. The 
other two were M.E. Comps. William Marshall Black 
and T. V. B. Bingay. Comp. Waddell says : 

"Comp. Bingay 's portion of the report was completed 
in good time, and it was expected that Comp. Black's 
would be in hand in time for publication. It was 
known that the state of his health was not satisfactory, 
but no one, himself apparently included, had any idea 
how serious his condition was. The result was that 
publication was withheld from day to day and from 
week to week in the expectation that a completed paper 
would be presented. When the summons came sud- 
denly, it was found that there was not sufficient time 



lxxxvi APPENDIX 

to complete the work, and it was decided to issue the 
proceedings without the correspondence rather than 
present an incomplete report. 

"Later it was decided that the 1916 report should 
be printed with our 1917 proceedings, the writer under- 
taking the review of jurisdictions assigned to Comp. 
Black, which he has done to the best of his ability, 
with the assistance of a good Companion who volun- 
teered his services. 

"We propose giving a double header next year, 
and from a new committee. Comp. Bingay, having 
served faithfully and well for many years, has been 
allowed to retire, and two younger Companions have 
taken up the task with the writer. The parting of old 
friends is always painful, and to the writer this parting 
is especially so, but it will not be for long." 

We respectfully offer our sympathy and venture 
to hope that Comp. Waddell — an excellent reviewer — 
may be long spared to associate with the members of 
the invisible Round Table. 

William Marshall Black died on the 8th May, 1917. 
The volume before us contains a brief memorial note 
concerning him. He was born in Halifax in 1866, 
and was thus a comparatively young man when he died. 
His home was in Wolfville, where "he engaged in all 
the activities of a public spirited citizen, having faith- 
fully served the town as mayor and in other capacities." 
He was Grand High Priest in 1905 and 1906. 

Having begun with the Correspondence Report, 
we may as well now have our say about it. Comps. 
Waddell and Bingay review the proceedings of 51 
Grand Bodies in 1915 and 1916. As we have said, 
it is ancient history, but it is very good reading. Can- 
ada's 1916 report is well summarised ; and a well- 
deserved compliment is paid to our Grand Scribe E. 
Modesty forbids mention of what Comp. Waddell says 
about Canada's Correspondence Committee. 

To come back now to the beginning of the book, 
the first thing to be noted is that R.E. Comp. Wilbert 
A. Creelman, Grand Scribe, presided, acting as Grand 
High Priest, in the absence of the actual Grand High 
Priest, M.E. Comp. Frederick Lewis Shaffner, owing 



APPENDIX lxxxvii 

to the critical illness of his wife. The Grand High 
Priest, however, had prepared an address, which was 
read to the assembled Companions ; it dealt with the 
usual business topics — decisions, dispensations, visits, 
and uniformity of work. 

Newfoundland is, as we know, in the territory of 
the Grand Chapter of Nova Scotia. The Grand High 
Priest was not able to visit Shannon Chapter, which 
is the only Chapter in Newfoundland — but R.E. Comp. 
W. A. Ellis, the Representative in Newfoundland of 
the Grand High Priest, made a report upon it, showing 
a satisfactory condition. 

There are 17 constituent Chapters ; membership 
on the 30th April, 1917, 1,614 ; net gain in a year, 66. 

The Grand Treasurer reported a cash balance of 
$2,815.28 after paying all expenses and giving $100 
to the British Red Cross Society. 

A Committee considered the advisability of sum- 
moning Grand Chapter to meet in Newfoundland, 
Under the auspices of Shannon Chapter ; the report 
was that existing war conditions made the present an 
inopportune time ; but that the Grand Chapter was 
in duty bound to meet in Newfoundland whenever con- 
ditions should warrant the assumption that a Convo- 
cation held there would be a success. 

Grand Chapter was to meet, and probably did meet, 
in Halifax, in June, 1918. 

The following sums were appropriated for patriotic 
purposes : $400 to the Y.M.C.A. Overseas Fund ; 
$400 to the Canadian Patriotic Fund ; $200 to the 
Canadian Red Cross Society. 

Joseph R. Bennett, Halifax, Grand High Priest. 

S. J. Waddell, Truro, Grand Secretary. 

Ohio. 

"We propose to say that a Prussianised Germany 
shall never rule a world of serfs and slaves." These 
and other good and strong words were spoken by Grand 
High Priest John H. Baehr, in his address to the assem- 
bled Companions at the 102nd Annual Convocation 
of the Grand Chapter of Ohio, held in Cleveland, 
on the 9th and 10th October, 1918. It is significant — 



lxxxviii APPENDIX 

but by no means unusual- — that one whose name be- 
speaks his Teutonic origin should be at one with Anglo- 
Saxons in his detestation of the abominable doctrines 
and practices of the unspeakable ruffians of Mid- 
Europe. 

The Grand High Priest, after an eloquent opening, 
made a feeling reference to the death of Past Grand 
High Priest Lewis Mackey Lea, of Sandusky, on the 
8th August, 1918. He was born in Sandusky in 1843, 
was a veteran of the Civil War, a good citizen, and an 
active and prominent Mason. He was Grand High 
Priest in 1907-8. 

The remainder of the address was taken up with 
a detailed report of the Grand High Priest's official 
acts and a description of the proceedings of the General 
Grand Chapter in Baltimore on the 2nd and 3rd Oc- 
tober- — just before Ohio's Convocation. Comp. Baehr 
was present with other potentates from Ohio, one of 
whom, P.G.H.P. William T. S. O'Hara, was elected 
General Grand Master of the First Veil of the General ' 
Grand Chapter. It appears that the Masons of Balti- 
more were delightfully hospitable. "Junketing" is 
not mentioned by name, but — 

There are big figures in the Report of the Grand 
Treasurer. He brought forward on the 1st October, 
1917, a balance of more than $30,000 and received 
almost the same amount during the year ; he disbursed 
about $28,000, and reported an increased balance on 
hand on the 7th October, 1918— $33,852.69 to be exact. 

The Grand Secretary, R.E. Comp. Edwin Hagen- 
buch, presented his 20th Annual Report. There are 
190 Chapters, including one under dispensation. The 
returns of all Chapters but 4 were received within the 
allotted time. The total membership on the 31st 
July, 1918, was 47,693. "The net gain," the Grand 
Secretary says, not without some justified pride, "was, 
during the year, 3,103, which is 228 more than that 
of last year, which was much the largest up to that 
time. The gain was all made by 152 Chapters, as 
24 lost in membership and 14 stood still." 

The Annual Report of the Trustees and Officers 
of the Ohio Masonic Home was presented by Past 



APPENDIX lxxxix 

Grand High Priest Levi C. Goodale. The Home is 
for dependent men, women, and orphan children. Very 
large sums have been devoted to its construction and 
upkeep, but its accommodation is overtaxed, and an 
appeal was made by Comp. Goodale for more money. 

The Committee on Accounts recommended that 
$5,000 of the Grand Chapter's surplus should be in- 
vested in Liberty bonds and given to the Home. This 
was adopted ; so also was the recommendation of a 
cash gift of $2,500 to the American Red Cross Society. 

The acquisition of the John Snow residence in 
Worthington, Ohio, the birth-place of the Grand Chap- 
ter, with the relics therein, was approved. The 
property, which consists of a two-storey brick-house 
and a lot 150 by 135 feet, near the centre of the town, 
is to be transferred to Grand Chapter by the present 
owner, a great-granddaughter of John Snow, on con- 
dition that she be allowed to occupy it during her life- 
time without expense for taxes, insurance, or repairs. 

An unusual incident was the arrest of the charter 
of one of the subordinate Chapters for contemptuous 
refusal to discontinue practices constituting a gross 
violation of the regulations of Grand Chapter — for 
many years past a number of the Companions of this 
Chapter had, notwithstanding frequent admonitions 
by Inspectors and also by members of the Chapter, 
"persisted in making a grotesque and unpardonable 
farce and burlesque of the Royal Arch degree." 

An important resolution was passed — "that the 
in-coming Grand High Priest be authorised to take 
the needed steps to incorporate this Grand Chapter." 

"The result of our best endeavour for search and 
review of each Grand Jurisdiction that has come to 
us during the year, with the exception of Scotland, 
is submitted." Thus begins Past Grand High Priest 
Orion P. Sperra his 10th Annual Report on Foreign 
Correspondence, which embraces the proceedings of 
53 Grand Chapters. The proceedings of the Grand 
Chapter of Canada coming under review are those 
of 1918. "Word from the Capitular field of Canada," 
he says, "is always interesting and inspiring, and the 
report for this year more so than is usual. The patri- 



xc APPENDIX 

otic fervour of the Canadian Mason in time of peace 
has always appealed to the writer, and the appeal is 
now intensified in viewing the interest and participation 
of our Canadian Companions in the present conflict."" 

Comp. Sperra is felicitous in his expressions and 
has great skill in the work of preparing a report. We 
rise from a perusal of his latest with feelings of grati- 
tude for the pains he has taken. 

Harry W. Lloyd, Toledo, Grand High Priest. 

Edwin Hagenbuch, Urbana, Grand Secretary. 

Oklahoma. 

The 29th Annual Convocation of the Grand Chap- 
ter of Oklahoma was held in Enid on the 16th and 17th 
April, 1918. Bert Duncan Ashbrook, Grand High 
Priest, presided, and there was a good attendance of 
members. Comp. Ashbrook — we are enlightened by 
a portrait and a biographical sketch — was born in 
Ohio in 1868 ; spent his youth and early manhood in 
Nebraska ; came to Blackwell, Oklahoma, in 1900 ; 
there he organised an investment company, and was 
its secretary and business manager ; in February, 1915, 
he moved to El Reno, and became president of the com- 
pany, which he still manages. He is an enthusiastic 
Mason and a man of whom Oklahoma should be proud. 

The Report of the proceedings at this Convocation 
contains many references to the death of Grand Secre- 
tary Leo E. Bennett on the 28th 'May, 1917. He was 
born in Kansas in 1857, was Grand High Priest in 1893, 
and Grand Secretary from 1912 to 1917. He was by 
profession a physician. 

The address read by Grand High Priest Duncan 
to the assembled Companions is a good business docu- 
ment ; but there is nothing in it to interest outsiders. 

The Grand Treasurer, Otto A. Shuttee, reported 
a cash balance on hand on the 31st March, 1918, of 
$3,902.46, in addition to $1,000 invested in U.S. Liberty 
bonds. 

The Grand Secretary is the same James A. Scott 
who was Grand High Priest in 1916 and 1917, and 
was appointed Grand Secretary when the lamented 
death of Comp. Bennett occurred. Comp. Scott had 



APPENDIX xci 

some trouble in getting the Secretary's office into good 
shape ; but apparently he succeeded ; for he produced 
a very clear statement of affairs. There are 78 Chap- 
ters ; membership at the end of December, 1917* 6,549 ; 
net gain in a year, 389. 

After the Committee on Grievances and Appeals 
had reported that it had no cases to deal with — a con- 
dition speaking eloquently of harmony throughout 
the Jurisdiction — it was announced that Enid Chapter, 
instead of regaling the delegates with a luncheon, would 
contribute $150 to the War Relief Fund. (There is 
no record of applause ; and the famine announcement 
is immediately followed in the report by the statement 
that "Companion Borrowman at this time entertained 
the Grand Chapter by singing Scotch songs in imi- 
tation of Harry Lauder, which was enjoyed very much 
by the members present." But the singing would 
hardly allay the pangs of hunger ; and the next state- 
ment is that "Grand Chapter called off until 1.30 
o'clock p.m." We hope the members had at least a 
snack.) 

At the afternoon session the Finance Committee 
recommended that a special assessment of 25 cents 
per member be levied annually incident to the war 
and its many activities, to be remitted to the Grand 
Secretary with the annual dues. This was adopted. 

The new Grand Secretary, M.E. Comp. James A. 
Scott, presents his first report as Correspondent or 
reviewer of the proceedings of other Grand Bodies. 
He writes no introduction, but comes out into the 
open at once with "Alabama" and proceeds even 
unto Wyoming, taking on the way Canada (1917) 
but why not 1918 ? Comp. Scott explains himself in 
a brief " conclusion " thus : — 

"As Correspondent, I have been inspired, enlight- 
ened, and entertained by the productions of the able 
writers who have represented the various Grand Chap- 
ters and rendered their Annuals worth the while of any 
Capitular Mason. Hereafter I shall read them only 
for the purpose of quenching my thirst for such things 
as they serve, and not as a critic or commentator. If 
I disagree with them, I shall smile and pass on ; if they 



xcii APPENDIX 

express my own sentiments, I shall say 'amen' and rest 
continually in the consolation that they will never again 
have an opportunity to ' lambast' me for any of my own 
lamentations or smile at my follies. 

"They are a happy lot, are these Correspondents, 
and I hope to have the pleasure of meeting most of them 
at Baltimore this fall." 

Comp. Scott is a welcome recruit, but we wish he 
were less canny! 

Jabez Holmes Mann, McAlester, Grand High Priest. 

James A. Scott, Muskogee, Grand Secretary. 

Oregon. 

There is a good deal to tell about the doings of the 
Grand Chapter of Oregon at its 58th Convocation, held 
in Portland on the 10th and 11th June, 1918, despite 
the fact that — for a sad reason, which will appear — 
there is no Correspondence Report. 

Grand High Priest Silas M. Yoran, who presided 
at this Convocation, was born in Manheim, Herkimer 
County, New York, in 1835, and continued to reside 
in that part of the State until early manhood. In 1855 
he removed to Iowa, where he first farmed, and then 
went into commercial life. He was a member of the 
Legislature of Iowa in 1878 and again in 1880. In 1883 
he removed to Eugene, Oregon, founded and edited 
the "Eugene Register," and became known as a student 
and thinker. More recently he had given his attention 
almost exclusively to Masonic matters, and had reached 
high rank in all branches. (Short biography and 
portrait). 

In his address the Most Excellent Companion said: — 

1 ' There are several reasons why our Annual Report 
of proceedings will fall short of the usual amount of 
matter for reviewers to examine. The first, and most 
to be regretted, is the death, on the 7th April last, of 
our esteemed Companion and Foreign Correspondent, 
Henry B. Thielsen. Soon after our last annual Con- 
vocation he became ill and was unable to do the work 
of his office. He continued to hope for better health 
so he could endure the labour required of him — but his 
work was done. On the ist February, 1918, he was 



APPENDIX xciii 

stricken with paralysis, from which there was no relief, 
until the 7th April, when he was mercifully released from 
the affairs of earth. Though he had for a number of 
weeks become oblivious to his surroundings, announce- 
ment of his death came as a personal bereavement to 
his loving Companions. Learning that he had not 
prepared any part of an annual report on proceedings 
reviewed, and the time being short, I did not appoint 
a successor, as no Companion, having time and ability, 
seemed willing in so short a time to undertake to make 
a report creditable to himself and the proceedings 
reviewed. His Companion reviewers of sister Jurisdic- 
tions will accept our silent pages as monumental to 
Companion Thielsen." 

Henry Bune Thielsen was born in Michigan on the 
1st March, 1850 ; he came to Oregon in his early man- 
hood, and was identified with the railway development 
of the North- West, having held many positions of trust 
and confidence, in all of which he proved his worth. 
He had filled the highest offices in Oregon Masonry ; 
was Grand High Priest in 1901 ; and as an exponent 
of Masonic law and usage had no superior. His re- 
views of the doings of the Grand Chapters were among 
the best which came to our table. 

William Thomas Wright, of Union, who died on the 
11th of December, 1917, was Grand High Priest in 
1899-1900. "He was one of the most important and 
indefatigable workers ; his counsel was always sought ; 
and his deeds stand as living monuments of his Masonic 
excellence." (Report of the Committee on Memorials.) 

It was said by the Grand High Priest that his visits 
to the subordinate Chapters had been few because of 
afflictions at home ; and he emphasised a duty which 
is sometimes forgotten, when he said that "the Mason's 
obligations call for vigilant care in the home." 

A somewhat unusual transaction was thus recorded 
by the Most Excellent : — 

1 ' I issued a Grand Chapter dimit ' ' — perhaps it should 
be demit — "for our Grand Secretary to forward to a 
Companion in British Columbia who was formerly a 
member of Kirk Chapter, No. 36, at Athens, whose 
charter was arrested in 1916." 



xciv APPENDIX 

The Grand Treasurer's report showed an actual 
cash balance on hand of $2,382.73 after adding more 
than $2,000 to the invested funds of Grand Chapter, 
which already amounted to $14,000. 

The Grand Secretary reported 37 Chapters — 2 of 
them had been under dispensation, but were chartered 
at this Convocation ; total membership at the end 
of 1917, 4,379 ; net gain in a year, 178. 

A very interesting statement was made by the 
Grand Secretary in his Report, He said that during 
the session of the General Grand Chapter of the United 
States, in Baltimore in October, 1918, "the matter of a 
charter for our Grand Chapter" would be brought up. 
"The Grand Chapter of Oregon is the only Grand 
Chapter in the United States which recognises the 
supreme authority of the General Grand Chapter of 
the United States. I am informed that other Grand 
Chapters will follow our action and ask for charters." 
(See United States of America, General Grand Chapter.) 

The recommendation of a Committee of Grand 
Chapter, that "the income from interest-bearing bonds 
and stock owned by this Grand Chapter up to the 
amount of $500 per annum be given to the authorised 
committee" of a proposed Masonic Home, "for the 
purpose of its maintenance when in operation, said 
appropriation to continue each year until otherwise 
ordered by this Grand Chapter," was approved ; and 
a rider was added to the effect that the $500 so ap- 
propriated "be invested in War Savings stamps until 
such time as it may be needed by the Masonic Home 
Committee." 

Ex. Comp. A. H. Steiner, of Salem, was appointed 
Foreign Correspondent. We look forward to his review 
of the proceedings of 1918-19. 

Max Bollack, Portland, Grand High Priest. 

James F. Robinson, Masonic Temple, Portland, 
Grand Secretary. 

Pennsylvania* 

The proceedings before us are those of 1917. Quar- 
terly Communications were held at the Masonic Tem- 
ple, Philadelphia, on the 8th March, the 7th June, the 



APPENDIX xcv 

6th September, and the 6th December, and the Annual 
Grand Communication on St. John's Day, the 27th 
December. At all these meetings Grand High Priest 
Thomas McConnell presided. He was re-elected Grand 
High Priest for 1918. An excellent photograph, the 
frontispiece of the volume of proceedings, shows him 
to be a man of middle age, of high intellectual develop- 
ment. The proceedings are well printed, on good paper, 
and well arranged. The Annual Communication was 
the 122nd. 

Charles Cary, Grand Secretary Emeritus, died on 
the 4th August, 1917, at the age of 75. At the 3rd 
Quarterly Communication, a memorial, prepared by 
Past Grand High Priest J. Henry Williams, was read. 
Comp. Cary, it appeared, was born in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1842. His noted characteristics were gen- 
tleness and firmness. He was Grand Secretary of the 
Grand Chapter from 1894 to 1913, and had attained 
high rank in other branches of Masonry. 

From the very interesting address read by Grand 
High Priest McConnell at the Annual Grand Com- 
munications, we make the following quotations : — 

"In Capitular Masonry in Pennsylvania the orders 
and decisions of the Grand High Priest are final and 
subject to no appeal ; and his power over the making 
of Royal Arch Masons has no limitations, it being 
understood, of course, that he cannot make a Com- 
panion a member of a Chapter. This prerogative I 
consider one of the most important in the Fraternity, 
and have been and am determined to exercise it to the 
limit, wherever convinced that the black ball is used 
in subversion of the interests of Royal Arch Masonry. 

"No Chapter has jurisdiction over man or territory. 
The black ball can only be properly used to defend our 
Fraternity from the admission of unworthy men, and 
surely in Royal Arch Masonry we have the right to 
expect broad, manly vision and the absence of narrow- 
ness and selfishness. Any one using the black from 
a narrow or selfish motive, if he can be identified, shall 
be dealt with as an enemy of the Craft." 

"After very careful consideration and with all due 
respect to the expressed opinions of my predecessors, 



xcvi APPENDIX 

I have reached the conclusion that physical perfection 
as a qualification for initiation into Masonry is a land- 
mark applying only to the making of Free Masons. 
It has never been considered a bar to advancement 
at any other point except initiation into a Mark Lodge 
or Chapter, and its application at that point is quite 
recent. I have therefore decided that the qualifications 
necessary for initiation into Capitular Masonry are 
fully set forth in article 17, section 1, of the Consti- 
tution of Grand Chapter, which reads as follows : 
'An applicant for the Capitular degrees, or for mem- 
bership, shall have some visible means of an honest 
livelihood, be a Past Master either by election or dis- 
pensation, in good standing with the Fraternity, a 
member of a Lodge of Master Masons, and competent 
to perform all the work in the degrees he applies for. ' 
And I have accordingly permitted several applicants 
having slight physical defects, which in no way inter- 
fered with the performance of the work of the Capitular 
degrees, to be initiated." 

"On the 22nd October, 1917, at Harrisburg, in a 
meeting of Perseverance Royal Arch Chapter, No. 21, 
I caused a Royal Arch Mason to be made at sight." 

These are very important pronouncements and 
acts. Pennsylvania is, of course, a Sovereign Grand 
Chapter, not bound by what other Grand Chapters 
or the General Grand Chapter of the United States 
hold or do. 

Distinguished visitors at the Annual Grand Com- 
munication were the Grand High Priests of New York, 
New Jersey, and Delaware. They all made addresses. 

The business of Grand Chapter is done at the Quar- 
terly Communications. The financial condition is 
of course excellent — a large balance is shown. There 
appear to be 144 subordinate Chapters, with a total 
membership of 38,459 ; net gain in a year, 1,298. 

Great pains are taken in preparing the Report of 
the Committee on Correspondence. The Committee 
consists of five reviewers, headed by our old friend, 
William B. Meredith, P.G.H.P., who writes the pre- 
face. The reviews are as nearly as possibly evenly dis- 
tributed among the five ; and all do excellent work. 



APPENDIX xcvii 

The transactions of 45 Grand Bodies are dealt with. 
The review of Canada (1917) is the work of Comp. Mere- 
dith ; appreciation and approval are freely expressed. 

Thomas McConnell, 133 South Twelfth Street, 
Philadelphia, Grand High Priest. 

George B. Wells, Masonic Temple, Philadelphia, 
Grand Secretary. 

Quebec. 

It is a pleasure to record that our sister Grand 
Chapter of Quebec is holding her own in these troublous 
times. At the 41st Annual Convocation, held in Mon- 
treal on the 27th March, 1918, the Grand First Princi- 
pal, E. O. Dyer, in his address spoke of growth and 
harmony. 

This Grand Chapter sustained a severe loss in the 
death of M.E. Comp. William H. Whyte, which oc- 
curred on the 19th September, 1917, in Winnipeg, 
where he had just attended the yearly conclave of 
Great Priory. He was Grand First Principal in 1888 
and 1889, Grand Scribe E. from 1893 to 1917, and 
had filled almost every office of importance in all 
branches of Masonry, with credit to himself and benefit 
to the Craft. 

His vacant place was filled by the appointment 
first and then the election of William M. Couper as 
Grand Scribe E. 

The death of another Past Grand Z. was also de- 
plored. M.E. Comp. David Seath, who was Grand 
Z. in 1890 and 1891, died on the 23rd February, 1918— 
"a most zealous and faithful member of the Royal 
Craft." 

The Reports of the Grand Superintendents of Dis- 
tricts and of the Grand Lecturer spoke approvingly 
of the work done in the various subordinate Chapters. 

There are 14 Chapters on the roll; total membership, 
1,811 ; net gain in a year, 68. 

The financial statement is a good one. 

Among the best Correspondence Reports are those 
of M.E. Comp. E. T. D. Chambers, P.G.Z. of Quebec ; 
and we believe that to be the opinion of the Companions 
of the Round Table generally. Wise, experienced, 



xcviii APPENDIX 

and tolerant, and a graceful and scholarly writer, he 
touches nothing that he does not adorn. As he tells 
us in the preface to his review of 1918 — dealing chiefly 
with proceedings of 1917, but (almost by a miracle) 
including Canada 1918 — 31 years have elapsed since 
the publication in the Proceedings of the Grand Chap- 
ter of Quebec of his first contribution to the literature 
of Royal Arch Masonry. The labour involved, he says, 
is very heavy and consumes considerable time, but 
it is both enjoyable and instructive, and brings the 
worker into direct contact with the brightest minds of 
the day in the world of Masonry. 

"An apparent love of novelty," he goes on to say, 
and perhaps a desire on the part of some of the authors 
of these Reports to escape the labour of condensing 
the records of proceedings in all the different Juris- 
dictions of the Royal Craft, have led to less thorough- 
ness than formerly in some of the published reviews." 
And, when he comes to California (1917), he says of the 
reviewer of that Jurisdiction : "He adopts the new- 
fangled topical style of Report, without any attempt 
to inform his readers as to the condition of Masonry 
in the various sister Jurisdictions, and one-half of his 
work is a plea for the justification of its form." So 
much for the thesis of Comp. Adams of California, 
which, in our report of 1918, we transcribed almost at 
length. 

In our opinion, our Quebec ally has the best of the 
argument. His own Report — that now before us 
(1918) — summarises the proceedings of each Grand 
Chapter in turn, following the usual alphabetical order ; 
but, in addition, contains a discussion of subjects or 
topics both timely and interesting. These are : "Ma- 
sonic Homes," "The General Grand Chapter Propo- 
sition," which is vigorously combatted ; "The Founda- 
tion of Freemasonry," "Solicitation," "The War," 
and "Capitular Progress." 

Forty-six Grand Bodies are more or less fully treat- 
ed of in the Report ; Canada (1918) receives appreci- 
ative notice. 

Richard S. Kinghorn, Montreal, Grand Z. 

W.M. Couper, Montreal, Grand Scribe E. 



APPENDIX xcix 

Rhode Island. 

The State is a small one, and the Grand Chapter is 
naturally not large, but it has in it more Royal Arch Ma- 
sons in proportion to the number of Master Masons than 
any State in the Union; and, among its 11 Chapters, 
has one, constituted in 1793, which has 2,282 members, 
and is still growing. The total number of members is, 
or was at the end of December, 1916 — for we are dealing 
with rather ancient history — 4,984 — a net gain of 181 
in a year. The proceedings before us are those at the 
119th Annual Convocation, held in Freemasons' Hall, 
Providence, on the 13th March, 1917. Writing in 
January, 1919, we cannot help wondering why we have 
not the proceedings of March, 1918. 

Frederick Eugene Leonard, Grand High Priest of 
1916-17, is presented to us by a photograph and a brief 
biography. He was born in Providence, Rhode Island, 
on the 26th March, 1859, of good old New England 
ancestry ; he resides and practises his profession — 
mechanical engineer and mill-architect — in Pawtucket. 
A very active Mason, he has held high office in most 
of the Lodges, Councils, and Chapters of which he is 
a member. "His ritualistic work," says his bio- 
grapher, "in the several branches of Masonry has been 
of a high order, always impressively rendered, appealing 
to the hearts of the Brethren and Companions. Out- 
side of the Lodge-room he has measured fully up to 
the standard of a true man and a sincere Mason." 

Among the distinguished visitors at this 119th 
Convocation were the General Grand High Priest of 
the United States and the Grand High Priests of New 
York and Vermont. General Grand High Priest 
George E. Corson made an eloquent speech. 

Grand High Priest Leonard's address was, as he 
said, "a simple and concise statement of his personal 
transactions " during his term of office. He had visited 
every Chapter in the Jurisdiction at least once, and 
some of them several times. 

"I found in all the Chapters," he said, "a strong 
interest in the affairs and welfare of the Order, the 
records neatly and correctly written, finances in good 
condition and well taken care of, and a general feeling 



c APPENDIX 

of harmony and contentment prevailing, indicative of 
good management and prosperity. In nearly all the 
Chapters the degree work is impressively and con- 
scientiously performed, and is deserving of commend- 
ation. Exceptions noted are, in each case, due to the 
individual, and not to the official corps as a whole, 
and could be easily remedied if the services of the 
Grand Lecturer were more frequently availed of. 
Basing my opinion on my experiences and observation 
gained by frequent visits to the several Chapters, not 
only during my term as Grand High Priest, but covering 
the period of the preceding three years of official and 
fraternal acquaintance, together with such statistical 
knowledge as I have derived fron the records of my 
predecessors, I state with confidence and pride that 
Capitular Masonry in Rhode Island is enjoying the 
most prosperous period of its existence." 

The Grand High Priest spoke strongly of the duty 
of the Royal Craft in respect of the Masonic Home 
which the Grand Lodge of Rhode Island had resolved 
to establish. A " Masonic Home Fund for the Relief 
of Indigent Masons and the Widows and Orphans of 
Masons" had already been started, and contributions 
to it were urgently solicited. Not till the fund shall 
reach $50,000 will Grand Lodge consider the actual 
establishment of the "Home." The duty of subscribing 
to the fund had apparently been laid upon the sub- 
ordinate Chapters, and some of them had responded 
liberally. We do not find that Grand Chapter made 
an appropriation at this Convocation. 

According to the Grand Treasurer's Report, Grand 
Chapter has assets of the value of more than $11,000, 
including a cash balance on hand. 

The list of notable Companions of this Grand Chap- 
ter who died in 1916 or early in 1917 is a long one. 
Chief est among the names is that of Charles B. Man- 
chester, who died in Providence in July, 1916. He 
was Grand High Priest in 1903-4. 

The Report of the Committee on Foreign Corres- 
pondence is presented by Past Grand High Priest S. 
Penrose Williams — a very concise and excellent sum- 



APPENDIX ci 

mary. The doings of 49 Grand Bodies, including 
Canada (1916), are recorded. 

Charles T. Glines, 113 Comstock Avenue, Provi- 
dence, Grand High Priest. 

William R. Greene, Freemasons Hall, Providence, 
Grand Secretary. 

Scotland. 

We have a good deal of information about the pro- 
ceedings of the Grand Chapter of Scotland in 1918, 
although we have no record of a Quarterly Convocation 
later than that of the 21st June. Perhaps we can best 
discharge the obligation we are under to tell what we 
have learned of the doings in Scotland in 1918, by quot- 
ing portions of the address of the Earl of Cassilis, Grand 
Z., at the Annual Convocation for the Installation of 
Grand Office-Bearers, held in Royal Arch MasOns' 
Hall, Edinburgh, on the 21st March, 1918. He was 
formally installed at that Convocation, with much 
ceremony, by M.E. Comp. C. C. Nisbet, Past Deputy 
Grand Z. The Supreme Chapter was opened by M.E. 
Comp. Sir Robert K. Inches, who had been Deputy 
Grand Z. for some years ; but was succeeded in office 
this year by M.E. Comp. Peter Spence, referred to, 
conveniently but perhaps not Masonically, as "Colonel 
Spence." 

The Grand Z. spoke of the past year (1917) of 
Supreme Grand Chapter as having an unexampled 
record. "We have now under our jurisdiction," he 
said, "not merely the Royal Arch Degrees proper, 
but also (with separate charters) Lodges of Royal Ark 
Mariners and Councils of Red Cross Knights, and in 
addition we act as the Grand Council of Royal and 
Select Masters. While these Bodies are all separate 
and distinct, with separate charters, the Principal 
Office-bearers are the same in the whole, in similar 
manner to the relationship between the Grand Lodge 
of England and the Grand Chapter of England. 

"The relationship is satisfactory, because those 
Degrees are so closely allied to one another, and the 
sequence of them to Royal Arch Masonry is of the 
utmost interest. 



cii APPENDIX 

"The concentration of government is also satisfac- 
tory, because a large number of rival governing Bodies 
in Masonic matters tends to a waste of energy and a 
waste of resources which does not commend itself. 

"Some 10 or 12 years ago we were happy in having 
a matter of 1,200 or 1,500 exaltations in the course of 
a year. This past year has resulted in 4,043 members 
being admitted to the Royal Arch Craft under our 
Constitution. This has added greatly to our respon- 
sibilities, but has also added greatly to our strength. 
A satisfactory feature is the strengthening of the care 
with which admissions are made. 

"In the Lodges of Royal Ark Mariners we have 
admitted 1,267 members, and in the Councils of Red 
Cross Knights we have admitted 1,365 members during 
the past year. As regards the Councils of Royal and 
Select Masters since we took them under our jurisdic- 
tion, that is, for the past 2 years, there have been 
admitted no fewer than 2,111 members, and the in- 
terest in the working of the Councils throughout the 
whole jurisdiction is very great indeed. 

"We have granted during the past year 10 charters 
for new Chapters, and have now under our jurisdiction 
330 active Chapters. Deducting those in foreign 
countries, such as the Chapter at Smyrna, and such 
also as the Chapter at Namur in Belgium, and the 
Chapter at Amsterdam in Holland — which are for 
practical purposes dormant, though many of their 
members are still, to our knowledge, alive and capable 
of work — one may take it that we have still 320 Chap- 
ters in good working order. It may interest you to 
recall that, in addition to the Chapters whose names 
are printed in the minutes of the last meeting of Su- 
preme Chapter, petitions for 9 new Chapters, which 
are in process of signature, have been passed, 6 from 
New South Wales, 3 in this country, and one intimated 
from Queensland ." 

The Grand First Principal came to the point which 
will most interest our American Companions when he 
said : — 

"As regards our relations with the rest of the world, 
they are not in all points satisfactorv. 






APPENDIX ciii 

"One of the questions which has arisen in Australia 
is that of certain small sections practising Masonry 
upon the English model, that is, separating the Mark 
and the Craft and the Royal Arch, forming small Grand 
Bodies, and arrogating to themselves the right of sole 
sovereignty in the district in opposition to our own 
organisations. 

"In New South Wales, for instance, some 20 Chap- 
ters, if so many, under a local Grand Chapter, claim 
the right to compel us, who have an overwhelming 
majority of members and now of Chapters, to give 
up our right to working our own system and chartering 
any new Chapters. 

"With a desire to be absoluterly fair to the wishes 
of the district, we at once assented to the suggestion 
that a vote should be taken among the members of 
both bodies as to which system they desired and which 
principle they desired to adopt. 

"No manifesto or representation of any sort were 
sent out on our behalf, and the matter was left as one 
of their own free will and accord, with the result that 
our Chapters, forming the large majority, unanimously 
decided to adhere to us. How, in these circumstances, 
some of our American cousins can pretend to support 
the action of a minority who represent and practise 
a system as different from theirs as it is from ours, it 
difficult to understand. 

"Another question which has troubled us, and 
which we hope to deal with, with a full session of Su- 
preme Grand Chapter to consider the matter, is the 
question raised by the granting of a charter for a Chap- 
ter in the Philippine Islands. 

"Time will probably solve this difficulty by the 
formation of a Grand Chapter there which will in- 
corporate our own Chapter with it, but the principle 
which our American cousins do not seem to understand 
is that the Royal Arch is a complement to Craft Ma- 
sonry, and wherever a Scottish Lodge exists we claim 
the right to have a Chapter attached to it." 

Audi alteram partem. 



civ APPENDIX 

The Most Excellent goes on : — 

"The message I wish to convey both to those who 
are friendly and those who at present do not agree with 
us, is, that we shall endeavour, both in conference 
and correspondence, to find a satisfactory solution, 
whenever the present troubles permit us to do so. 
We are at present engaged in maintaining the status 
quo. We are not adverse to conciliation, nor are we 
averse to concessions if they can be justified in the 
way an arbiter would try to find a reasonable com- 
promise between contending interests and divergent 
opinions." 

All of which seems fair. Of a speedy settlement, 
we hae oor doots. 

"As regards the Benevolent Fund and War Relief 
Fund," said the Grand Z., "we began the year with 
£6,186, and, subject to audit, we expect to find it end 
with £6,710 at our credit. I anticipate that the Gen-' 
eral Fund will show a like gratifying result." 

After the address, Supreme Grand Chapter was 
closed, and "a very simple service" (refreshment 
perhaps — can one partake of a service ?) "of fruit 
and cake was partaken of in the Banqueting Hall, 
but no celebration of the Vernal Equinox or speeches 
or singing took place." 

The Earl of Cassillis, Grand Z. 

Alfred A. Arbuthnot Murray, Edinburgh, Grand 
Scribe E. 

South Carolina. 

The proceedings before us are those of the 107th 
Annual Grand Convocation of the Grand Chapter of 
South Carolina, holden in the City of Anderson, on 
the 9th April, 1918 ; Grand High Priest William A. 
Giles (Graniteville) presiding. 

The address read by the presiding Grand Officer 
was brief and business-like. After welcoming the 
delegates and referring to the war — an inevitable refer- 
ence — the Grand High Priest said that he was glad 
to be able to announce that there were no deaths in the 
"official family" of this Grand Chapter to record . 



APPENDIX cv 

Perhaps an investment of the funds of a Grand 
Chapter in a land-security is unusual. A paragraph 
in the address is devoted to describing an investment 
of $1,000 in a mortgage of a house and lot in the City 
of Columbia. 

The Grand High Priest recommended that the 
Grand Chapter invest $1,000 in Liberty Loan bonds, 
and that the interest thereon, in accordance with the 
Constitution, be paid to the Masonic Relief Fund of 
the Grand Lodge. As to this the Finance Committee 
said : "After a very careful examination of the actual 
funds at the disposal of this Grand Body, and in view 
of the pressing needs of the different charities in our 
midst, we disapprove of this recommendation at this 
time." The Committee recommended that the sum 
of $300 be contributed to the Grand Lodge fund for 
welfare work among the soldiers. The report was 
adopted. 

At the request of the Red Cross Chapter of South 
Carolina the sum of $600 was furnished them to endow 
a bed in the Red Cross Hospital at Neuilly, France. 
The subordinate Chapters were requested to give an 
amount equal to 25 'cents per capita for this purpose. 
In the meantime the Grand Chapter would underwrite 
the amount until it could be returned by the subordin- 
ate Chapters. 

The Grand High Priest had received from the General 
Grand High Priest an official communication stating that 
the Convocation of the General Grand Chapter in the 
autumn of 1918 was to be, in keeping with the spirit of 
the times, for business purposes only, and recommend- 
ing that the formal and elaborate entertainments that 
had heretofore marked these triennial gatherings should 
be omitted, and that the attendance should be limited 
as far as practicable to the members of the General 
Grand Chapter. 

In view of this announcement, the Grand High 
Priest of South Carolina recommended, and the recom- 
mendation was adopted — that the provision made 
at the Grand Convocation of 1917 for the payment 
of the expenses of all Past Grand High Priests for at- 
tendance at General Grand Chapter, be revoked. 



cvi APPENDIX 

"I am pleased to state," said the Grand High Priest 
in conclusion, "that Capitular Masonry continues 
to grow, and that all the Chapters in the Jurisdiction, 
with perhaps two exceptions, are doing splendid work, 
and peace and harmony prevail throughout the Juris- 
diction." 

The Grand Treasurer reported a cash balance on 
hand of nearly $4,000 and invested funds about $3,800. 

There are 34 chartered Chapters and one under 
dispensation ; total membership, 3,470 ; net increase 
in a year, 172. 

The "Review of the Proceedings of Sister Juris- 
dictions, 1918," by Past Grand High Priest J. L. 
Michie — a native Scotsman, as he is proud to state — 
is, as usual, complete and able. No less than 55 Grand 
Chapters are accounted for. Canada (1917) receives 
full and favourable attention. Under California (1917) 
he has something to say about the nature of Corres- 
pondence Reports. He is by no means in sympathy 
with the opinions of Reviewer Adams of the Golden 
State. Comp. Michie has a style that is all his own — 
he is quite as much an American as a Scot — he quotes, 
but he also comments, and his comments are shrewd 
as well as funny. 

We find in the proceedings no record of an election 
of Grand Officers ; probably there is an election every 
second year only. 

William A. Giles, Graniteville, Grand High Priest. 

O. Frank Hart, Columbia, Grand Secretary. 

South Dakota. 

The Grand Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of South 
Dakota met in 29th Annual Convocation, in the City 
of Aberdeen, on the 13th June, 1918. 

R.E. Comp. Frederick Treon, Grand King, pre- 
sided in the absence of the Grand High Priest, M.E. 
Comp. West Babcock, who had undergone an operation 
on the ear only the day before the meeting, and in the 
absence (at a funeral) of the Deputy Grand High 
Priest. A telegram assured Comp. Babcock of the 
sympathy of Grand Chapter ; and the address which 
he had prepared was read. 



APPENDIX cvii 

He deplored the death on Christmas-day, 1917, 
of Past Grand High Priest Edward Boliver Bracy, 
who was born in 1826, and had thus attained the un- 
usual age of 91. Past Grand High Priest Park Davis, 
who died on the 20th August, 1917, was also a veteran, 
having been born in 1837. Past Grand Scribe Solomon 
Star died on the 10th October, 1917, at the age of 77. 

The Grand Treasurer reported a cash balance on 
hand of $4,436.48, which was nearly $1,200 less than 
the balance carried forward from the previous year, 
but apparently the disbursements included an invest- 
ment of $2,000 and a payment of $250 to the Masonic 
Building Association. 

There are 36 Chapters, with 4,122 members ; net 
gain in a year, 305. 

An appropriation of $1,200 in Liberty bonds was 
made for the Charity Fund of Grand Lodge. 

William A. Morris was elected Grand High Priest 
for 1918-19, but was not present to be installed. It 
was directed that he should be installed in the Chapter 
of his "home-town," Redfield. 

Frederick Treon aforesaid was elected and in- 
stalled as Deputy Grand High Priest. 

The piece de resistance of the book of proceedings 
is the Report on Correspondence — 47 Grand Chapters 
— by M.E. Comp. Louis G. Levoy. Canada (1918) 
receives brief but discriminating notice. 

In his conclusion he says that the year past (1917-18) 
is the banner year in Capitular Masonry in membership 
additions, despite the war. He then writes forcibly 
of the duty of Masons in this world-crisis. 

William A. Morris, Redfield, Grand High Priest. 

George A. Pettigrew, Sioux Falls, Grand Secretary. 

Tennessee. 

Grand High Priest Charles Henry Smart, who pre- 
sided at the 89th Annual Convocation of the Grand 
Chapter of Tennessee, held in Freemasons Hall, Nash- 
ville, on the 28th January, 1918, is a man somewhat 
advanced in years, withal vigorous and capable of much 
work. During his year of office, as he said, in a very 
able address delivered at this Convocation, he had 



cviii APPENDIX 

visited 70 out of the 87 Chapters in the State, and in 
so doing had travelled 6,821 miles, by all sorts of convey- 
ances, and had met hundreds of the Companions } 
' ■ but nowhere near the number that should have greet- 
ed me." Nine of the Chapters visited had failed to 
secure a quorum of members to open the Chapters on 
the occasion of his visits. 

Speaking of the dead, the Grand High Priest said 
that during the past year there had been no invasion 
of the ranks of the Grand Officers or Past Grand High 
Priests, "We can look back," he said, "over a period 
of 44 years and see our beloved Foster, our oldest Past 
Grand High Priest, still as erect in stature and as bril- 
liant in intellect as when he wielded the gavel in this 
Grand Body, although more than one-half of those 
who succeeded him have been gathered to the land 
where our fathers have gone before us." 

After referring to the Washington Memorial Associ- 
ation and the Masonic War Relief Association, and 
recommending a subscription of $1,000 to the funds 
of the latter, the Grand High Priest took up the sub- 
ject of Grand Lecturers, and said that from conver- 
sations with Companions throughout the State, as 
well as from his own observations, he was of the opinion 
that the system of District Lecturers in vogue would 
for the present fill the want for which it was created. 

There are some Chapters in Tennessee which are 
dormant or becoming so. The charter of one was 
arrested by the Grand High Priest in November, 1917 — 
he "being satisfied that the Chapter had drawn its 
last breath." 

The " Condition of the Rite" was the subject of an 
impressive appeal by the Grand High Priest. He 
described it as "simply miserable," outside of the 
Chapters in the cities and many of the large towns. 
There are 20 Chapters "whose halls are shrouded in 
impenetrable gloom from January to December." 
The appeal was for a revival of interest. "General 
Indifference" was' in supreme command in at least 30 
Chapters. The Grand High Priest made a masterly 
presentation of the case, with elaborate statistics. 



APPENDIX cix 

The Widows and Orphans' Home and the Old 
Masons' Home in Tennessee are the property of Grand 
Lodge and by it supported, but the Grand Chapter 
has in the past "done its bit" in helping to maintain 
these institutions. The Grand High Priest recom- 
mended appropriations of $1,000 and $500 respectively. 

The Grand Treasurer's Report showed a balance 
of over $15,000 on the right side. 

The Report of the Grand Secretary was more 
encouraging than that of the presiding officer. During 
the year 385 Masons w T ere exalted. One Chapter, 
which had 31 members on the 31st December, 1916, 
exalted 26 during the year, a net gain of almost 84 
per cent. The total membership of the Chapters on 
the 31st December, 1917, was 6,007 ; and there was 
a net gain in a year of 161. 

Among the recommendations made in the Report 
of the Committee on Ways and Means, w T hich was 
adopted, were the following : — 

(1) No appropriation for a representative to the 
George Washington Memorial meeting. 

(3) An appropriation of $400 as a gift to the Ma- 
sonic War Relief Association. 

(7) An appropriation of $1,000 as a gift for main- 
tenance or needed improvements to the Widows and 
Orphans' Home and $500 for the Old Masons' Home. 

(12) No appropriation for the celebration of the 
100th Anniversary of Royal Arch Masonry. 

(13) Increase of Grand Secretary's salary to $600 
per annum. 

(14) Loan of $5,000 to Grand Lodge. 

(15) Investment of $5,000 in Liberty bonds. 
James Harry Swan, of Bristol, Tennessee, born in 

London, England, in 1851, was elected and installed 
as Grand High Priest for the ensuing year. He came 
to the United States from England in 1851 ; settled in 
Bristol in 1878 ; went into business there as a house 
decorator ; and still continues in it most successfully. 
"A great honour has been put upon deserving and capa- 
ble shoulders" (brief biography, with an excellent 
portrait). 



ex APPENDIX 

Comp. H. G. McClister, P.G.H.P., thus begins his 
Report on Correspondence — he is an old hand at it : — 

"The frosts have tinged the forests and the Golden 
Rod is waving in the valley, as we make preparation 
to begin our Fifteenth Annual Journey through the 
capitular world. The pile of books to be read looks 
appalling, and we know that ere the Yuletide passes, 
the printer will be wanting copy, so we begin our 
task, remembering that time, patience, and persever- 
ance will accomplish all things." 

Fifty Grand Jurisdictions receive impartial at- 
tention ; Canada (1917) is not forgotten ; and a very 
excellent result is achieved. 

J. H. Swan, Bristol, Grand High Priest. 

Stith M. Cain, Nashville, Grand Secretary. 

Texas. 

The Grand Chapter met on the 3rd December, 
1917, and continued in session for three days. It was 
the 68th Annual Convocation ; Waco was the place 
of meeting ; and Grand High Priest Ben F. Dwiggins 
presided. 

In the course of his address, after welcoming the 
delegates and referring to the war in eloquent terms, he 
read a letter which, early in his year of office, he had 
sent out to all the Grand Visitors of Districts, urging 
them to take steps to increase the number of Royal 
Arch Masons in Texas. "With 68,000 Master Masons 
in Texas," he said, "it is a reflection on us that we 
have only 22,000 on our rolls. With so much material 
at our doors knocking for admission, let us get busy 
and knock it into the finished product." The letter 
"caught on ;" splendid results were obtained ; the 
highest number of exaltations in a single year was 
reached. 

Six Chapters were regularly constituted under 
charters during the year ; and four dispensations were 
granted for the formation of as many new Chapters. 
One Chapter was dead, and its charter was revoked. 

The Grand High Priest said that he had everywhere 
met with the inquiry : "Is it permissible to solicit 



APPENDIX cxi 

Master Masons to become ' Royal Arch Masons?" 
He had replied that it was not only permissible, but 
that it was the duty of Royal Arch Masons to induce 
Master Masons to take the step — a duty to them and to 
ourselves. 

The following eminent members of Grand Chapter 
who had died during the year were specially mentioned : 
Thomas H. Haynie, P.G.H.P. ; W. D. Burdett, Past 
Grand High Priest ; W. P. Lawrence, 11 years a member 
of the Committee on Work ; L. A. Daniels, Chairman 
of the Committee on Credentials ; A. W. Campbell, 
an old member of Grand Chapter and a Past Grand 
Master of the Grand Lodge of Texas. 

Many visits were made by the Grand High Priest ; 
he had travelled nearly 7,000 miles ; and he emphasised 
the importance and usefulness of visits to Chapters. 

A large part of the address of the Grand High 
Priest, and a still larger portion of the volume of pro- 
ceedings, are taken up with reports, discussion, and 
appeals in regard to the Texas Home for Aged Masons 
and their wives. The Home is at Arlington, and at 
the time of Convocation it had 56 inmates. The 
demands for sustenance and enlargement — for there 
was a waiting list — were insistent. A noble work 
indeed ! 

The Grand Treasurer reported a balance of $22,- 
780.33 on hand. 

The Report of the Grand Secretary was an inter- 
esting one : 284 chartered Chapters and 4 under dis- 
pensation ; 2,265 exaltations during the year ; total 
losses, 1,187 ; total membership (1917), 23,231 ; net 
gain in a year, 1,595. 

R.E. Comp. O. M. Longnecker, who was elected 
and installed as Grand High Priest, is presented in a 
photograph ; he appears to be a young and vigorous 
man and looks like a good Mason. 

It will not be forgotten that Texas retains its posi- 
tion as an independent Grand Chapter, refusing to 
bow the head in the temple of the General Grand Chap- 
ter of the United States. 

Comp. Carlton E. Mead (of Marfa) thus heads his 
report : — 



cxii * APPENDIX 

"Report of Committee on Fraternal Correspond- 
ence — Annual Review of Capitular Grand Bodies" — 
and begins : "For the fifth time by the grace of our 
Grand High Priest, and the indulgence of the Com- 
panions, we undertake the arduous duty of preparing 
an Annual Report on Royal Arch Masonry, as shown 
by the work of the various Grand Jurisdictions." He 
reviews only 43 ; Canada (1916) is one ; but it is such 
ancient history, actually going back to 1914 in one 
place, that we think it better to say nothing about 
Comp. Mead's remarks anent Canada, although they 
are both wise and witty. 

In his conclusion he says : "We are glad to report 
a decided tendency on the part of the Royal Craft to 
forward charitable and educational work." 

O. M. Longnecker, Houston, Grand High Priest. 

T. M. Bartley, Waco, Grand Secretary. 

United States of America. 

We have before us a bulky and important volume: — 
no less than the "Proceedings of the General Grand 
Chapter of Royal Arch Masons of the United States 
of America at its 37th Triennial Convocation, Balti- 
more, Maryland, A.I. 2448, A.D. 1918, also Proposed 
Revision of Constitution and Statutes." 

We remember that in 1916 we endeavoured — in 
vain — to obtain the Report of the Triennial Convo- 
cation of 1915, held in San Francisco, for our first 
review. We had to content ourselves with references 
to it in the reports of State Grand Chapters, and ex- 
pected to do so as regards the Triennial Convocation 
of 1918 ; but at the last moment (24th January, 1919), 
the bulky volume aforesaid found its way to our desk, 
and we forthwith plunged into it. 

We have read many of the speeches of General Grand 
High Priest George Edgar Corson, and now we have 
seen him, in counterfeit presentment of course, and 
have learned something about him from a biographical 
sketch (p. 195). He was born at Lebanon, Maine, 
in 1842. At the age of 19 he enlisted in the 17th U.S. 
Infantry. He was wounded in the battle of Spotsyl- 
vania Court House in 1864, and took his discharge 



APPENDIX cxiii 

in the same year. He then went to Washington, be- 
came a clerk in the War Department, and now occu- 
pies a high position in that Department, after a service 
therein of 54 years. In 1871 he took the degree of 
LL.B. from the George Washington University, and 
was admitted to the District of Columbia Bar. He 
first saw Masonic light in 1870, and has since occupied 
the highest positions in all the different Masonic Bodies 
of the District, having been Grand High Priest in 
1886. We know of course that he was elected General 
Grand High Priest in 1915. "Possessed," writes his 
biographer, "of a dignified yet pleasing presence, a 
genial, affable, and courteous disposition, a broad 
intellectual mind, and an unflagging interest and 
energy in all the activities of Masonic circles, he has 
filled with conspicuous ability the many offices of trust 
to which he has been called." 

It was this distinguished Mason who presided at 
the 37th Triennial Convocation, held in Baltimore on 
the 2nd and 3rd October, 1918. 

Loyalty, Patriotism, Service, were the notes of the 
opening. 

There was a fairly good representation of Grand 
Chapters. Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Texas — perhaps 
other State Grand Chapters too — do not belong to the 
Union. Nevada, New Mexico, South Dakota, Wash- 
ington, West Virginia, and Wyoming, were not repre- 
sented. 

The list of members of the General Grand Chapter 
who had died since the Convocation of 1915 was natur- 
ally a long one — for three years is a long time, and 
Past Grand High Priests are usually well up in years. 
Three of the notables received special mention : Bestor 
Gaston Brown, who was Grand High Priest of the 
Grand Chapter of Kansas (see under "Kansas") in 
1893, and was General Grand Scribe at the time of his 
death, July, 1917 ; Thomas Jacob Shryock, who was 
Grand High Priest of the Grand Chapter of Maryland 
(see under "Maryland") in 1914, and was General 
Grand Treasurer at the time of his death, February, 
1918 ; and Nathan Kingsley, who was Grand High 
Priest of the Grand Chapter of Minnesota in 1886, 



cxiv APPENDIX 

and General Grand High Priest from 1909 to 1912 ; 
he died in September, 1918. 

Many subjects were taken up in the address read 
by General Grand High Priest Corson. The corres- 
pondence between the officers of the General Grand 
Chapter and the officers of the Grand Chapter of Scot- 
land was set out at length. The two Grand Bodies 
are wide apart. The General Grand Chapter is not 
a body recognised by the Grand Chapter of Scotland ; 
but apparently the latter is ready to waive the dis- 
ability or supposed disability and discuss the differ- 
ences amicably. "I do not believe," writes the Scots 
Grand Scribe E., "that we shall readily find a solution 
of our differences without a personal conference of 
some sort." And Comp. Corson's statement to the 
General Grand Chapter is : — 

"I have taken no additional action in this matter. 
The contentions of the General Grand Chapter on the 
subject were so fully, forcibly, and conclusively pre- 
sented by my predecessor, Companion Witt, in his 
correspondence with the Earl of Cassillis, the Grand 
Z., that at this stage, and without some definite action 
on the part of the Supreme Grand Chapter of Scotland, 
further action on our part does not seem to me to be 
demanded. The status quo can be maintained until 
the termination of the present war, when perhaps a 
personal conference, as suggested by Companion Mur- 
ray, the Grand Scribe E., can be arranged, and an 
amicable understanding arrived at, which correspond- 
ence has failed to bring about." 

The General Grand Chapter has $22,000 invested 
in bonds and about $9,000 cash in banks. 

The well-known Charles A. Conover, General 
Grand Secretary, presented a voluminous document — 
his third triennial report. 

One matter of interest, already touched on, under 
"Oregon," is referred to in this report, viz., "the grant- 
ing of a charter or service certificate, properly executed 
designating the official relation of each Grand Chapter 
to the General Grand Chapter when it is organised." 
The request of the Grand Chapter of Oregon for a 
charter from the General Grand Chapter was referred 



APPENDIX rxv 

to the Jurisprudence Committee of the latter body. 
The Committee reported — and the report was adopted 
— that under the Constitutions of the General Grand 
Chapter the issue of such a charter is not provided for, 
and is unnecessary. 

Perhaps the most interesting items in the General 
Grand Secretary's Report are grouped under the head- 
ing of "Constitution and Inspection of Subordinate 
Chapters," that is, not (subordinate) Grand Chapters, 
but subordinate or private Chapters, in different parts 
of the world, under the jurisdiction of the General 
Grand Chapter. These are 11 in number : 1 in Hono- 
lulu ; 1 in Valparaiso ; 1 in Shanghai ; 1 in San Juan ; 
1 in Manila ; 2 in Cuba (Havana and Santa Fe) ; 2 in 
Alaska (Fairbanks and Nome) ; 2 in the Panama Canal 
Zone (Ancon and Christobal). 

In the winter of 1916, Comp. Conover set sail for 
the West Indies. The object of his journey was to 
constitute the Chapter at Sante Fe, Isle of Pines, and 
to install the officers, That duty he faithfully per- 
formed on the 25th February, 1916. His next assign- 
ment was to visit and inspect Island Chapter No. 1, 
Havana ; and this also was accomplished on the 28th 
February. 

A similar visit of inspection was paid to Canal Zone 
Chapter No. 1, at Ancon, on the 6th March. 

The General Grand Chapter dissipated its surplus 
at the Convocation in a delightful way : $15,000 to the 
American Red Cross Society ; $8,000 to the Y.M.C.A. 
for its Overseas Service ; $2,000 to the Salvation Army 
for its Overseas Service ; $25,000 in all. Well done ! 

Reports of Special Committees on Revision of the 
Ritual and Revision of the Constitution were received. 
The Constitution, as revised and submitted, is printed 
in full at the end of the proceedings. 

The Baltimore Companions were hospitable, but 
we find nothing to warrant the charge of "junketing. " 
We confess, however, that the menu of the banquet 
on the 3rd October makes our mouth water. Oh ! to 
be in Baltimore in October. 

The 4th day of October was "A Day at Washing- 
ton," where the members of the General Grand Chap- 



cxvi APPENDIX 

ter were the guests of the Grand Chapter of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia. This included a visit to Mount 
Vernon. 

Frederick W. Craig, Past Grand High Priest of the 
Grand Chapter of Iowa, was elected and installed as 
General Grand High Priest. His address is : Capital 
City Bank Building, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Charles Arthur Conover, Coldwater, Michigan, was 
(of course) re elected Grand Secretary. 

The next Triennial Convocation will be held in the 
City of Raleigh, North Carolina, on a date to be de- 
termined. 

Utah. 

All presiding officers of Grand Royal Arch Chapters 
read addresses at the Annual Convocations, and in 
1917 and 1918 all naturally allude to the war. If a 
prize were offered for the best essay by such an officer 
on the war and its relation to Masonry, Grand High 
Priest Sam H. Goodwin of Utah would be well up in 
the running for the award. We quote one trenchant 
sentence from his address at the Convocation of 1918 : — 

"In the reply given by Masonry to the appeals of 
our Government in the hour of her greatest need, we 
have nothing of which to be ashamed. Liberty bonds, 
Red Cross work, Y.M.C.A., Thrift stamps, Smilage 
books. Conservation of Food — though new terms in 
the vocabulary of Masonry — represent interests and 
calls to service to which Masons have given instant 
and unhesitating response. And the beautiful and 
significant Service Flags, with their flecks of heaven's 
blue, speak more positively than aught else of the 
pregnant fact that heroism, and honour, and unselfish- 
ness, and nobility of character, are not meaningless 
terms, but are potent still to glorify and sanctify human 
life and endeavour." 

The Grand Chapter is young and as yet small. 
There are but 6 subordinate Chapters ; total mem- 
bership, 771 ; net gain in a year, 22. 

The only financial investment is $100 in two Liberty 
bonds of the first issue. The Grand Treasurer reports 
a cash balance on hand of $811.98, after making this 



APPENDIX cxvii 

investment. The subordinate Chapters invested 
$2,550 in Liberty bonds. 

The 7th Annual Convocation was held in the Ma- 
sonic Temple, Provo, on the 8th May, 1918. 

Grand High Priest Goodwin (a lawyer, we guess 
from his portrait, but are not told) delivered, as we 
have indicated, an excellent address. He was much 
concerned about saving unnecessary expense to Grand 
Chapter, and said that he had concurred in the cur- 
tailing of the Report on Correspondence in order to 
save on the printer's bill something which would go 
towards the expenses of a delegate to the General Grand 
Chapter. He dwelt at considerable length on the 
function of a Correspondence Report. He himself 
does not believe that the topical form is the best ; 
and he emphasises the statement that that form is 
not established for the future. 

"This year's work and fellowship with you," he 
concludes, "have greatly enriched my life, and made 
me feel with a new force that ' I am wealthy in my 
friends. ' " 

The "Topical Review of Correspondence" is by 
Ex. Comp. A. S. Chapman, who seems to be a somewhat 
unwilling victim of the curtailment decree (he has got 
it down to 6 pages) and somewhat doubtful of the merit 
of his pot-pourri. We confess that we are not greatly 
intrigued by it. He mentions Canada's Grand Chap- 
ter once, thus : "The Grand Z. of Canada is in favour 
of one Grand Chapter and Provincial Grand Chapters." 

Grand Chapter appropriated $75 for the expenses 
of one delegate, the new Grand High Priest, or his 
nominee, to the Triennial Convocation of the General 
Grand Chapter. 

Frank P. Sherwood, 702 South State Street, Salt 
Lake City, Grand High Priest. 

Walter Daniels, Masonic Temple, Salt Lake City, 
Grand Secretary. 

Vermont. 

The 101st Annual Convocation of the Grand Chap- 
ter of Vermont was held in Burlington on the 14th 
June, 1918— Grand High Priest George N. Tilden 
presiding. 



cxviii APPENDIX 

In his address he said that among the several Com- 
panions of this Jurisdiction who had died during the 
. past year were two eminent Masons : Edwin H. Mar- 
tin, of Middlebury, who was Grand High Priest in 
1909 ; and Henry D. Bryants, of Morrisville, Grand 
High Priest in 1912. 

While the Grand Secretary's Report might not 
show a record increase in membership, the Grand High 
Priest felt justified in reporting that the standard of 
efficiency had been maintained and that never in the 
history of Capitular Masonry in Vermont had the 
real spirit of brotherly love — which makes for our great 
institution of Freemasonry — been so firmly imbedded 
in the hearts of members as now. 

The statistical statement of the Grand Secretary 
showed 30 subordinate Chapters, all of which had 
made returns ; total membership (1918), 4,655 ; net 
gain in a year, 56. 

The Grand Treasurer reported that $7,000 had, 
since the last Annual Convocation, been invested in 
Liberty bonds, and that there was a cash balance on 
hand of $6,794.61. 

The Reports of the Grand Lecturer and District 
Deputy Grand High Priests spoke of good work done 
in the subordinate Chapters. 

Past Grand High Priest Eugene S. Weston pre- 
sented the Report of the, Committee on Correspondence. 
It was his second review — a careful and able one. When 
reviewing Canada (1918), he spoke of a fairly large 
sum spent in "benevolences," and said he wished 
there might be a similar report from every Grand Chap- 
ter. He was of opinion that there was too little char- 
ity by the Royal Craft and too much tendency to ac- 
cumulate a surplus. 

In conclusion Comp. Weston said :— 

"We have been taken to task by some reviewers 
because of our opposition to the General Grand ; but 
nothing has been said to change our views. When 
they present some concrete fact showing the benefit 
of the General Grand, aside from furnishing a junket 
once in three years , we will consider this- ^argument . 
We believe that our Grand Chapter would be/better 



APPENDIX cxix 

off if there was no General Grand. To be sure, it 
gives a Grand Officer a chance, once in three years, 
to rub elbows with those from other Jurisdictions, but 
it does not change our customs or laws." 

William H. Brewster, Middlebury, Grand High 
Priest. 

Henry H. Ross, Burlington, Grand Secretary. 

Virginia. 

In taking up for review a Virginia volume we always 
(perhaps "always" is presumptuous, for this is only 
our fourth experience) feel pleasure in the anticipation 
of something readable at the least, but regret because 
the volume is so ancient. Here we are in 1919 with 
the proceedings of the Grand Chapter of Virginia of 
October, 1917, before us. Would that we had 1918 
also ! When we turn to glance at the Correspondence 
Report, we find it concerned with our proceedings of 
February, 1916 ; and when the Virginia reviewer 
comes to our Report of 1916 he finds something in it 
abotrt his report of 1914, which in turn may have 
referred to our report of 1912. This is exasperating. 
But all else in the volume before us is delightful. 

The 110th Grand Annual Convocation was held 
in Richmond on the 23rd and 24th October, 1917, 
with M.E. Comp. J. E. W. Timberman, of Alexandria, 
Grand High Priest, presiding. 

General Grand High Priest George E. Corson was 
welcomed as a distinguished visitor, although, as he 
said, the Grand Chapter of Virginia does not belong 
to the household of the General Grand Chapter. His 
allusion to this was graceful and discreet : — 

"I am sorry, my Companions, that I cannot call 
you 'my boys, ' as I would be proud to do if you were 
within the pale of the General Grand Chapter. But 
because you have seen fit to maintain your independ- 
ence we have no quarrel with you, and our fraternal 
relations are just as close and our brotherly love just 
as warm as though you were a member of our great 
family. Let me assure you that should you at any 
time take it into your heads, as I hope you may some 
time, to join the General Grand Chapter, you would not 



cxx APPENDIX 

be called upon to surrender one right or privilege you 
now enjoy as an independent Grand Body. But, 
whether united or separate, we will work together for 
the great purposes of Royal Arch Masonry. We will 
all inculcate the same principles, teach the same lessons, 
administer to and inspire our Companions with the 
same moral and social virtues, and thus strive to make 
the world better, and thus prevent a recurrence of the 
atrocious warfare with which the whole world is ac- 
cursed to-day, and hasten the day when peace shall 
smile upon all people and all lands, and right, justice, 
and humanity shall prevail because they have learned 
and come to believe that sublime lesson taught in Ma- 
sonry, the Fatherhood of God and the Brotherhood 
of Man." 

"No discordant note," said Grand High Priest 
Timberman, in the beginning of his address, "disturbed 
the peace and harmony of our Grand Jurisdiction — 
the Companions have learned well how best to work 
and best agree." 

In the course of the year death had removed from 
Grand Chapter the following distinguished Com- 
panions : William James Hubard, of Richmond, who 
was Grand High Priest in 1901-02, and Grand Lecturer 
for many years ; Henry Knox Field, Grand Master of 
Masons in Virginia ; and Samuel W. Thompson, of 
Culpeper, who was Grand High Priest in 1905-06. 

An appeal for the Virginia Masonic Home was made 
by the Grand High Priest briefly thus : — 

"An institution of this character should need no 
plea from any one for its support. An official circular 
to each Chapter has made all the plea that should be 
necessary ; and, if you have not made your contribu- 
tion, the Grand High Priest says to you bluntly, 'You 
have not done your duty.' " 

The net gain in membership in 1917, the largest 
in 8 years, was 348 ; the total membership on the 1st 
October, 1917, was 8,209 ; there are 69 subordinate 
Chapters ; 12 Chapters have each a membership ex- 
ceeding 150, and the 12 have an average membership 
of 300. 



APPENDIX cxxi 

This was the 22nd Annual Report of the Grand 
Secretary, R.E. Comp. James Braxton Blanks ; and 
the Grand Treasurer, M.E. Comp. George Wilson Poe, 
has also been continuously in office for 22 years. 

The cash balance on hand on the 15th October, 
1917, was $724.84, and the amount of the invested fund 
is $1,000. 

When we come to the Report on Fraternal Corres- 
pondence, we find it hard to understand the introduc- 
tory note : "The work is done and the printer notified 
August 14. All that have been received are reviewed." 
"August 14" surely must mean August 14, 1917, and 
yet the proceedings reviewed are all of 1916. Many 
reports of 1917 must have reached Virginia — certainly 
that of "Canada." Nevertheless, the reviews are in- 
teresting. The work of M.E. Comp. Joseph W. Eggle- 
ston is always good ; and streaks of drollery abound. 
He says, under "Canada, 1916," referring to some 
semi-humorous remarks on the Most Excellent Master 
degree, that "with us the degree is a charming one." 
Let us quote also the generous remarks of Comp. 
Eggleston, anent the now buried Alberta trouble, that 
"we never doubted that Canada could handle the case, 
and if let alone the whole trouble would 'rub off when 
it got dry.' " 

Fifty-three volumes of proceedings are appreci- 
atively dipped into by the learned reviewers, who seems 
to enjoy his work. After reviewing Wyoming, he 
prints in large type the word "Conclusion," and then 
asks, "How do you like it ?" And that is all; but the 
great secret of report-writing, like letter-writing (per 
Sam Weller), is to make the reader wish there was 
more ; and so say we all. 

James Bowman, Roanoke, Grand High Priest. 

James Braxton Blanks, P.O. Box 55, Petersburg, 
Grand Secretary. 

Washington. 

Economy was the watch-word of the Grand Chap- 
ter in 1918 — it was manifested in the brevity of the 
printed proceedings — but charity and patriotism were 
not stinted. The Grand Treasurer's Report at the 



cxxii APPENDIX 

34th Annual Convocation, held in Chehalis on the 9th 
and 10th September, 1917, showed a cash balance on 
hand of $5,224.64 ; $500 was "donated" to the Ma- 
sonic Home of Washington ; and an investment of 
$1,000 in Liberty bonds was authorised. 

The address of the Grand High Priest, Charles 
Glastonbury Smyth (portrait but no biography), was 
brief and businesslike. 

The Grand Secretary reported that all the chartered 
Chapters — 38 — had made returns ; the total member- 
ship on the 30th June, 1917, was 4,878 ; net gain in a 
year, 115. 

From the brief address of the Grand Orator, E. 
Comp. William T. Drips, we quote this paragraph: — 

"The true Mason is enrolled in the service of hu- 
manity. We endeavour to teach our novitiates to be 
good men and good citizens, so that they may teach 
by example as well as by precept. In the rebuilding 
after the war, when democracy shall have been estab- 
lished all over the earth, and the Brotherhood of Man 
accepted by all peoples, the results of the labours of 
Masons for the past centuries will be made manifest." 

The Grand Secretary and Correspondent, Past 
Grand High Priest Yancey Crawford Blalock, pre- 
sented his 29th Annual Report as Grand Secretary and 
his 28th as Correspondent. Both were chiefly statis- 
tical — this was apologised for in the case of the Report 
on Correspondence, "crowded for room" being the 
excuse. Canada (1918) was among the 50 Grand 
Bodies noticed. 

In the Grand High Priest's address it was said 
that the official line of Grand Chapter had in his year 
of office not been broken by death ; but we see by a 
memorial printed towards the end of the volume that, 
shortly after the close of Grand Chapter, a death sum- 
mons was served upon William Vance Rinehart, who 
was Grand High Priest in 1890. He was indeed a 
veteran Mason ; born in Indiana in 1835, he was made 
a Mason in 1861 ; he fought in the Civil War, was 
Major of the First Oregon Infantry from 1862 to 1866 ; 
State Senator of Washington in 1889 and 1890 ; he was 
living in Seattle when his last call came. 

Jacob Henry Miller, Wenatchee, Grand High Priest. 

Yancey C. Blalock, Walla Walla, Grand Secretary. 



APPENDIX cxxiii 

Wisconsin. 

The 68th Annual Convocation of the Grand Chap- 
ter of Royal Arch Masons of Wisconsin was held in 
the Scottish Rite Cathedral in the City of Milwaukee 
on the 19th and 20th February, 1918. 

From the address of Grand High Priest John E. 
Langdon, who presided, we take this statement : — 

"It gives me pleasure to report, in a review of the 
work of the past year, that it is one on which we can 
look with considerable satisfaction. The membership 
on the 1st January, 1918, is 13,217, showing a net gain 
of 691. The general conditions are good — peace and 
harmony prevailing in our Grand Jurisdiction." 

The Report of the Grand Secretary, William W. 
Perry (his 17th Annual deliverance), shows that there 
were, at the end of 1917, 92 chartered Chapters, 86 of 
which made returns, and 2 Chapters under dispensation; 
these were at this Convocation granted charters. The 
total membership on the 1st January, 1918, was 13,217. 

The Report of the Grand Trustees showed invested 
funds to the amount of about $8,000. 

The Grand Treasurer's Report disclosed a cash 
balance of $8,597.70. 

The deaths of three distinguished Past Grand Offi- 
cers were feelingly announced by the Grand High 
Priest. These were : Franklin Pierce Ains worth, 
who was Grand High Priest in 1904 ; John Grimshaw, 
Grand High Priest in 1907 ; and Levi Howland, Grand 
Scribe in 1888. 

Three Chapters were chartered and constituted 
during the year 1917. 

The Grand Lecturer reported that he had visited 
49 Chapters during the year and had found them 
"active in most cases and as a. whole doing more than 
the usual amount of work." 

The whole record is highly satisfactory ; and, 
perhaps for that reason, there is little to record here 
and less to comment upon. 

The Report on Foreign Correspondence is signed by 
Samuel Wright, Committee. This is his exordium :— 

"We have, as heretofore, endeavoured to cull from 
the 50 odd volumes submitted to us, such items as in 



cxxiv APPENDIX 

our judgment would interest our Companions, and 
thereby perhaps tend to inculcate within them a deeper 
reverence for our Capitular tenets. 

"Our thanks go out to our fellow-Correspondents 
who heretofore by their favourable comment have 
encouraged our efforts, and also to those who have 
criticised our struggles, thereby enabling us to view 
ourselves as others from a distance may see us — a 
service too valuable to be ignored." 

Comp. Wright is a competent and industrious re- 
viewer. He does full justice to the salient features 
of the proceedings of the Grand Chapter of Canada 
in 1917. In all 52 Grand Bodies are reported upon. 
We recommend perusal of his review of "Texas," of 
whose proceedings he has made a close study. 

His conclusion, brief, like his opening, is worthy 
of attention : — 

"Notwithstanding the unsettled condition of our 
country as the result of its being drawn into the world's 
war, nearly all of the Grand Jurisdictions show re- 
markable numerical gains, Ohio leading with a net 
gain of 2,875. 

"Superlative expressions of patriotism, with acts 
consistent therewith, have dominated the proceedings 
of nearly all if not all of the Grand Bodies in past year. 

"The vexatious and apparently irrepressible ques- 
tion of territorial jurisdiction between local Chapters, 
is still the "bone of contention." Even the old 
staid Jurisdictions like that of Pennsylvania and of 
New York seem still to have their troubles on that 
score. One of our youngest Grand Bodies, Utah, how- 
ever, appears to be the first to solve the problem. All 
its Chapters have been given concurrent jurisdiction." 

Michal Barry, Phillips, Grand High Priest. 

William W. Perry, Milwaukee, Grand Secretary. 

Wyoming. 

The 10th Annual Convocation of the Grand Chap- 
ter of Wyoming was held in the Masonic Temple, 
Cheyenne, on the 11th July, 1918. 

In the address read by Grand High Priest Robert 
I. Turner he reported prosperity, peace, and harmony — 



APPENDIX cxxv 

no grievances. He made a suitable reference to the 
war, paid a tribute of respect to departed Companions — 
the ranks of the Grand Officers, past and present, were 
untouched — and gave an account of his official acts. 

The Report of the Grand Treasurer showed a cash 
balance of $858. 

The Grand Secretary — M.E. Comp. Adrian J. 
Parshall, who is also the writer of the Correspondence 
Review — reported a revival of interest in Capitular 
Masonry in the State, especially among the younger 
Chapters. The gain in membership was a little better 
than 10. per cent. — the greatest in the history of the 
Jurisdiction. The spirit of patriotism was indicated 
among the Chapters by the rush of the younger mem- 
bers to the service of the country and by the liberal 
response made to nearly every call for charity in con- 
nection with the war. 

There are 12 Chapters ; total membership, 1,126 ; 
net gain in a year, 105. 

The proceedings are well arranged and well printed 
on good paper ; but there is little in them to interest 
outsiders, apart from the Report on Correspondence, 
which deals with the procedings of 57 other Grand 
Bodies in 1917— none of 1918 are included. The Re- 
port is in every respect excellent. Dealing with Canada 
(1917), the reviewer says that he believes the Report on 
Correspondence should be, as it often is, the chief part 
of the proceedings — at least so far as creating an in- 
terest in the Craft is concerned. 

Arthur C. Jones, Laramie, Grand High Priest. 

Adrian J. Parshall, Cheyenne, Grand Secretary. 

Conclusion. 

The Alabama Reviewer, the well-known Lee, ad- 
mits that there is nothing novel or startling in the 
proceedings which he reviews, but he finds a "note of 
hope and progress almost everywhere." The note is 
distinct enough to be heard ; but the admission goes 
too far. Seek for something both novel and startling 
under "Pennsylvania," supra. 

Then there is the General Grand Chapter of the 
United States. It met in October, 1918 ; and, as it 



cxxvi APPENDIX 

meets only once in three years, and is not like any 
other Grand Chapter, it is something of a novelty, 
at least to this poor scribe, who never until the other 
day saw a record of its proceedings. They are at least 
interesting, if not startling ; and, if the proverbially 
gentle reader will look back to "Scotland" and "United 
States of America," he will find statements on both 
sides relating to a very pretty controversy that is "on" 
and likely to be "on" for years. 

It is worthy of remark that the foregoing reviews 
all relate to proceedings before the armistice was signed. 
The meeting of the Grand Chapter of Indiana (7th and 
8th November, 1918) is hardly an exception, for it 
was the unfounded rumour that the armistice had been 
signed which caused great rejoicing among the Com- 
panions assembled in Indianapolis on the first day of 
the meeting. 

Consequently, at all the Grand Convocations above 
described, the war and still the war, and not the making 
of peace, was the theme. 

We may answer at once and firmly the question, 
propounded in our introduction, whether the flag was 
waved and whether the eagle screamed. Enthusiasm 
there was in abundance, the flag was. often referred 
to in these proceedings of State Chapters with which 
we have so largely dealt, but we are bound to say that 
there was not one word that could be counted boastful. 
Everywhere and always, in a great variety of phrases, 
many of which we have recorded, the proclamation 
ran :. "We are in this war not for conquest, not for 
glory, but to do the duty taught at the Masonic Altar ; 
to make the world free ; to do that duty we must 
fight ; and we who stay at home must work and pray, 
must save and sacrifice." Thomas R. Marshall, Vice- 
President of the United States, speaking as a plain 
Companion before the Grand Chapter of Delaware at its 
jubilee celebration, said that the men who did not do 
these things were dead, though they walked the streets; 
and he added that in God's mercy they might yet be 
made alive. 

Canada's earlier participation in the war was not 
always forgotten. Under "Columbia (District of)" 



APPENDIX cxxvii 

we have quoted a noble sentence from the pen of the. 
gifted Fulkerson. 

Indeed if all the words we have set out above, 
taken from the addresses delivered at Grand Convo- 
cations, are read — they are typical, and we make no 
apology for quoting them — it will be found that the 
Royal Arch Masons of the United States, so far from 
being boastful in their demeanour, are, in just the 
right way, urging upon their fellows the practice of all 
the manly and Masonic virtues. It must be "not only 
with our lips but in our lives :" and we have recorded 
much to show that words have been translated into 
action. 

The most wonderful thing is the increase in the 
membership of the Royal Craft during the period of 
which we have been writing — 1917 and 1918 — the 
America-at-war period. The strange exception to 
the general increase is in the very heart of the Republic 
— the District of Columbia. One Grand High Priest 
has laid it down that it is the duty of Royal Arch Ma- 
sons to invite Master Masons into the fold. And why 
not ? Perhaps in Washington they have been too 
busy with the vital work of the war. 

We have found, scattered through the many pages 
we have perused, allusions to dying Chapters, and 
usually in that connection an appeal for better ritual- 
istic work. It is said that where the work is not well 
done, the interest of the members ceases. This is 
true ; and it may be added that the prosperity of a 
Chapter largely depends upon getting new members 
as well as keeping the members it has got. The candi- 
date for the Chapter is in a very different position from 
the candidate for the Blue Lodge. The former already 
knows much about ritual, and probably has a very 
shrewd opinion as to the quality of the work done in 
a Chapter in his own vicinity before he enters its por- 
tals. Ritual, of course, is not everything, and its im- 
portance is often exaggerated, but we never knew a 
prosperous Chapter where the work was not at least 
fairly well done. 

In the above reviews and notices much will be 
found about the eminent deceased in the various 



cxxviii APPENDIX 

Jurisdictions. No apology, we hope, is required for 
this. A Grand Chapter is an entity — but it is made 
up of men, and some account of the Rulers of the Royal 
Craft — the most marked among their fellows — may 
well be deemed a necessity. The good which, men 
do should be acknowledged while they live, but a full 
account of it cannot be given until they are dead. 
What we should like to see in a memorial is more about 
the dead man and less about death generally. 

A notable seat at the Correspondents' Round Table 
is vacant. Under "New York" will be found a great 
tribute to Marvin I. Greenwood, who died after com- 
pleting his 14th Annual Review. In connection with 
this there is an interesting history of the growth of 
Reviews in the Grand Chapter of New York. 

Fraternally submitted v 

EDWARD B. BROWN, 
Committee on Foreign Correspondence. 



APPENDIX 



Proceedings Reviewed. 



Alabama 1917 

Alberta 1918 

Arizona 1918 

Arkansas 1917 

California 1918 

Colorado 1918 

Columbia (District of) 191S 

Connecticut 1918 

Delaware 1918 

England and Wales 

(M.M.M.) 1917 

England and Wales 

(M.M.M.) 1918 

Florida 1918 

Georgia 1918 

Idaho 1917 

Idaho 1918 

Illinois 1917 

Indiana 1918 

Iowa 1917 

Ireland 1917 

Kansas 1918 

Kentucky . 1917 

Louisiana 1918 

Maine 1918 

Maryland 1917 

Maryland 1918 

Massachusetts 1917 

Michigan 1918 

Mississippi 1918 



Nebraska 1917 

New Brunswick 1917 

New Brunswick 1918 

New Hampshire 1918 

New Jersey 1918 

New Mexico 1917 

New York 1918 

New Zealand . . .1918 

North Dakota 1918 

Nova Scotia 1917 

Ohio 1918 

Oklahoma 1918 

Oregon 1918 

Pennsylvania 1917 

Quebec 1918 

Rhode Island 1917 

Scotland 1918 

South Carolina 1918 

South Dakota 1918 

Tennessee 1918 

Texas 1917 

United States of America 
(General Grand 

Chapter) 1918 

Utah 1918 

Vermont 1918 

Virginia 1917 

Washington 1918 

Wisconsin 1918 

Wyoming 1918 



SPCi H5 7I<? CI A3 I ^15 



1586 



3Co Scribe* 



PLEASE OBSERVE AND COMPLY 
WITH THE FOLLOWING : 



Proceedings 



^rand Scribe 
md C 



ancial year of Subordinate Chapters ends on 
the 31st December, and Scribes E. are required to forward 

and Scribe E., immediately there- 
after. 

Writ lames of Companions, in full, plainly in the 

retur that there may be no errors in filling out the 

Chapter Certificate. Also see that the age, occu- 
pation, and place of residence are not omitted. Where 
ncluded, the date of decease should accompany 
>rd. 

Send a full list of the officers of your Chapter immedi- 
ately after installation. 






«: 



Grand Chapter 

Royal Arch Masons 



OF CANADA 



ELECTED OFFICERS FOR 1919 

M. Ex. Comp. W. N. Ponton, K 

Grand Z. 
R. Ex. Comp. H. S. Grifl 

Grand H. 
R. Ex. Comp. R. H. Spencer, Trenton, I 
M. Ex. Comp. George Moore, Hamilfr 

Treasurer. 
R. Ex. Comp. Henrv T. Smith, Toronto, Ont 

Scribe E. 
R. Ex. Comp. W. J. Wadsworth, Toron 

Scribe N. 
R. Ex. Comp. T. F. Campbell, Gait 

pal Sojourner. 
R. Ex. Comp. D. R. Gibson, Hami1i< 

Registrar. 
R. Ex. Comp. E. B. Brown, K.C., Toronto, On1 

Historian. 
Comp. Hiram Pritchard, Toronto, Ont., 



m 



ADDRESSES 

M. Ex. Comp. W. N. Pon1 

Bridge Street, Belleville, Ont. 

R. Ex. Comp. Henry T. Smith, Grand 
Temple Building, Richmond ; 
Toronto, Ont. 

Grand S 



:i 



The Sixty-second Convocation of the Grand Chapt< 
Canada will be held in the Citv of Toronto, Ont., Wed- 
nesday, February 25th, 1920. 



BROCK UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 




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